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Full text of "Clarion Call, September 14, 2006 – May 3, 2007"

Vol. 93, nos. 1 - 24 



Septembers, 2006- 

May 3, 2007 



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Clarion Call Sept.- December 2006 



Title 

A.L.F InternationarFashionShow 

A.L.F.; begins September 30 

Academic calendar reluctantly approved 

ACES provides opportunity for CUP 

Admissions Web site named one of best in country 

Alpha Phi Omega hosts eighth an nuafFood Stock 

Art Night showcases student work 



17 



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Autumn Leaf Festival officially begins ~ 

Balanced budget possible for CU in near future 

Baseball and Soccer teams raisejnone y for Muscular Dystrophy^ 

Bauer, Adam^ plays Rugby Down Under 



Behind the scenes of Fall CampusFest 2006: Volunteer^vork or slave-work 
Bogus airline boarding pass demonstration creates uproar 
Businessesjittj^acUtudents^and customers at expo 



Carter, Lauren: NamedJPSACVNtest^enof theweek 



CDC continues inves^gation^saTmonella outbreak in U.S. produce 



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Clarion University democrats and republicans attract large audience 

Clarion University speaks^ut about jssuesarid^concerns 
ClarionJJrTivereitystuderT^tarrestecf 



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QlaiiOQUjiiyereltyworksJo^ 

Clark, Chris: is firet mate rujiner jnClanonjiistofy to compete at NCAAN ationals 

College Republicans revamp club 

Communication department namechange approved 



CoristructjonofCUBJDC^egins 

Contest^n^couragesjtuctenteto^s^^ 

Counseling seryices offe r alcoho l screenings i n Chand ler dinmghair 

Country takes^overJDampusFest 

Cr oss C ountry in action at Penn State 



Cross Couri^ti^eri^arTdJ/Vo^ both finish In top five 

f^rr\t>B ^<«imL. «_— :-.. 7T . _. . .: — r — zzr. — 



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Cross^untryjeams^njoyju^cess at PSAC's in Bloomsbm^ 

r'mr-e- r>Ai ■•«*>.. 4^— _- t 1.1 ■ TTT. :~^ z — 



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Cross Country teams^face thojjghcqm^etitioriat Pgnn^Stat e Invite" 

Cross Country teams finish well at NCAA East Regionals 

Cross Country teams jearirig up for P^SAC^ 

CU_o^'?_or|jineJMMAJ^sJ^^ 

CU recognized^in bo ok, "American PJacesT^ 

CU spotlights student^Joggers " 

CU students participate in POWERLibrary d emonst ra tion 

CU Web pagejByampedJoi^urrenJ^stud^ 

CUP^Q'eb rates 2nd Annual Co nstitution^Day 

CUP completes carnpus-w^^ ~ 

CUP hosts first Hip-Hop Symp osium ' 



CUP public safety strives to maintaFsaftey 

CUP receiyedjerfqrjnaricejunding^grand exceeding~$2 million 

?-UP MyMts carnpusjolice at Reinhard 



CUP to host Hip-Hop symposium 



Customer AppreciatiojiDay,J.ight:iJMightJri^^ 



Dami en the H ypnotist sends volunteersjo another world 
D ebate Team : nationajlyrariked^ beg ins season 
D emocrats gain rnajority^f joyernorships 



Dept. to charge admission for umcomlng season 



B 



Date 

November 2, 2006 
Sept. 14, 2006^ J^ 
December 7, 2006 
Sept. 14, 2006 



^ge 

3 



1 



1 



Sept. 14, 2006 



Sept. 28, 2006 



Noyembe^g, 2006 6 

October 5, 2006 
November 9, 2006 
Novem ber 9, 2006 | 9 

No vember 2, 2006 
Sept. 28, 2006 



November 2, 2006 
Sept. 28, 2006 
October 19,2006 
November 2, 2006 



N^ovember^2, 2006 
December 7, 2006 
October 26,^2M6 
October 19, 2006 



November 30, 2006 



Sept. 28, 2006 



Octo b er 19 , 2006 
October 26, 2006 



November 2, 2006 



Sept. 28, 2006 



Sept. 21, 2006 



October 12, 2006 



October 19, 2006 



November 2, 2006 



Sept. 28, 2006 



November 9, 2006 



October 26, 2006 



November 30, 2006 



November 30, 2006 



Sept. 14, 2006 



November 2, 2006 
November 16, 2006 



Sept. 21. 2006 



October 19, 2006 



October 19, 2006 



October 12, 2006 



Octo ber 5, 2006 
Sept. 21, 2006 



Sept. 21, 2006 



November 16, 2006 



Nove bmer 16, 2006 



Sept. 28, 2006^ 



November 9, 2006 
Sept. 21, 2006 



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Carlson Library 
Cterion Univerelty 
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Clarion Call Sept.- December 2006 



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DJ Kool Here, founder of Hip-Hop comes to CUP ~ 

Doran, Joshua: New Developments on student arrest 

Embryonic research spurs political and religious debate 

Ensle, Kay: named assistant to executive dean 

Faculty Senate amends Students Rights and Regulations. Grad¥Ap7e~ir 

i-aculty Senate approves appointments 

Faculty senate to select deans ^^ 

Firms vie to provide the future of border security 

Football drops finale at Ship 

Football drops home finale toCal U ' ~ 

Football falls at Kutztown " 

Football falls to Slippery Rock in PSAC opener 

Football falls to West ChesterTn home o^ner ~ 

Football gets first victory against Cheyney " 

Football: Clarion falls to Lock Haven 14-7" 



B 



October 12, 2006 
November 16, 2006 
November 9, 2006 
Sept. 28, 2006 
October 12, 2006 
October 26, 2006 

Sept. 28, 2006 

_Sept. 21,2006 
November 16, 2006 \ 
November 9, 2006 
Sept. 14,^2006 _ 
October 5, 2006 
Sept.J1^2006 ~ 



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Foo^ballLGoldenEagles puts up a fight againsMOth granked Blo^msb^i^ 

Foster in his firstyeaj^ Clarion ~~ ^^ 

Four men stabbed jn off-campuVfight 

Fullington Bus Service working to re-Tun^^ute^ntoClsirbrr 
Funds^propriated to two campus organizations 
Gentile, Vickeyireaches 1^00 career digs 

Golden Eagle footballtoses at]home^o Edinloro 

Golden Eagle Volleyball qualifies forNCM-s 

Golden Eagles lose after leadingTuP at halftTme 

Go[fJinisJies^cond^Westmirister 
GojfTeamJnishes fourth in PSAC's 



October 12, 2006 



November 2, 2006 



Sept^ 28^2006_^ 
October 5, 2006 
October 12, 2006 



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Golf Tejrnfiriishej^h^^Ohio Valley Invitational 

Golf team wins Hal Hansen Invitational^ ~~ 

Golf Team wjnsJ/VheelingJesuirin\^te '^ " 

GoLfwinj^atJt^incerirsTnvitajional 

GraJ^anielle^CyTRIO^Jpwa^Bound^^^^^^^^^ 

Gunmen opensjre in Montreal Coltege^killing^ne 

Homecoming court announced ~ 

Homeconiing King and QueennarTied ~~ 

Honors^tudente^reserit senior p^^ 

Ice Cream^p to be openedjn Gemmell 

Immigrationjaw^eriforcement^egins ~ 

In search of^a North FtoreaPojjc^ 



Octoberjg, 2006 
December J, 2006^ 
SeptJ1,2006 



October 26, 2006 



November 9, 2006 



October 19, 2006 



Ortober 5, 2006 



October 19, 2006 



SeptJ4,2006 



Sept. 21, 2006 



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_98 
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InterneUjse^in^somerises to an addiction 

Kifer^eiaprqv^asmembei:^^^ C^unciTofTrusteii 

Kirri^ V^ung^Gyoung^publis^^^ journar 

Kolencik.PaWdaand^arianjieJernadovvskic^ 

Lassowsky. JaropolkLCy nioums lossof professoTrafsows^^ 
Lassowsky.Jaro^ojkMTiourns passing of ' — 



101 



102 



Lee, Wond^n: CU hostsjBxchange^schoTar 

LingwajUndrew^toJead PR ethics pcmel 

Men's basketball goesTl"^nlv»^game^r^dlrb 

Men's Track and Field may face elimination 

Music majoj-s organize their own recitals " 

Nobel Peace Prize continues its long history ~ 



Sept. 28 , 2006 
October 12, 2006 



November 2, 2006 
Sept. 14, 2006 



October 5, 2006 
October 12, 2006 



December 7, 2006 



December 7, 2006 
Sept. 28, 2006 




Novebnwl6j^006 
November 30, 2006 



October 12, 2006 



November 9, 2006 



November 2, 2006 



October 26, 2006 



November 2, 2006 



Sept. 21,2006 



December 7, 2006 



November 30, 2006 



Octobe r 19, 20 06 
Sept^21^2006_^ 
[October 19. 2006 



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Clarion Call Sept.- December 2006 



103 



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105 



Numberous RSOs allocated money from suppiemeniai lundn.y 

Pearce, Joshua: CUP scientific study published in journal 

PENNAEYC/ACEl to host Kid's Day 



B 



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111 



116 



117 



Pharos Scholars help preserve Clarion's history _ __ 

Pink ribbon products are not always what theiLseem 

Podcasts aren't just about portability _ tioF 

PRSSA to host Dublic relations professional Ackerman of JHC 
Reading fortheJDure event welcomes readers and donation^ 

Recognized student organizations allocated rnoriey 

Recycled items get put to good use 

Relay for Life hold auditions fo musical _ _ _ 

Righter Ron^vi«ns SOOtlias^Clarion head coach 

S&TB&iik donates $100,000 to Clarion University _. — _ 

SAFE begins training for volunteers 

Safety improvements at CU 




October 19, 2006 
October 5, 2006 
[November 16, 2006 

Sept. 28, 2006 

October 19^2006 
October 12, 2006 
November 9, 2006 
October 26, 2006_ 



October 5, 2006^ 



119 



Sept 21jJ006__ 
October 5, 2006 _ 
November 30, 2006 
^ober19,2006_ 
Sept. 14, 2006 



118 Scholar awards sponsored by Provosts office 



121 



122 



123 



125 



ScholarshipsW$2.000tobeawardedtoeightClanonstudente_ 

Scott, J^stinnamed PSAC golfei of the week — 

Security concerns now dictate how schols arebuilL _ 

Serialbank robber stikes Cla^ionCounty 

Soccer sets schooLrecorcl for \A«nsjni season __ 

Soccejjeamjnape^fourjamejosirigstrejk^ __^ 

SoccetM|v]nsjair qnjh^^ 



Noyemberg. 2006 

Sept.J1^006 

October 12, 2006 
Sept. 21, 2006 



Novembe r 16. 2006 



126 Soliders share Iraq experiences with students 



127 



128 



129 



130 



Sept.J!lJ006 

November 30, 2006 

Sept 28, 2006 

SeptKMOe^ 
Sepri4,2006 



t>0liaer5 Allelic nan vi/vK^-. — ■—-"■-■■ -- i^TTZ^Ainn 

Spina, Vincent combines humor andjincerityatjoetQ^^ 

State schools impact suroundirig areas — _ r-r^^-r 

Sterner Mark gives studentsAlesson on notdrinJ<ing and driving 
StudentSenate discussed illegal RSO account, other cqn^ns__ 




^ Stirdent>enate drscusses CL[connipliance with Title IX 



132 



133 



Student senate reports increase in enrollment^jrad^ation rate 

ISSi^ardentedS^ZChancMr^aM P-^ 
Student S^ateLOyeriSORSOswithinjctiyeAtat^^^ 



October^5^2006^ 
NovembeM6^2006 
November30j^006 
Sept. 28,j 006 



1 
1 



6 



134 Student Senate: Over 50 Kbus wiin jnai;uvc si«u«, 

Ws i^Se^tels^^ty^^hys^ecogni^^^^^^^^^ 



November 2,^006^ 
October 26/2006^ 
November 9/2^^ 



136 



139 



140 



141 



142 



Student/ faculty ratio questions addressed x^h^tottTpi^sues 

Students listen as State^Representativejiornmeesd^ 

Student's poem performed on^stege^ rwc-^Ji;;;^;Hri?x? ' 

Stu^enl^rate^^aren^s and donatiorisat^^ 

Swimrning^Clariqmwo^^ Men^tie 

Symposium": Reservations recommended _ — 

Tennis defeajs Georgian^Court S^^t 



December 7, 2006 



143 Tennis drops openeratjt V[ncerit 



Tennis arops opeiiei 6Hj ?i- vH iw^nt — — _ — 

144 tennis ream joe^uridefeatedonjhree day, threg^^^^^ 

145 T^nr^team travelstoBloomsburg forlTA Regionals — ^. ^-j- 

146 Thefreshn^a^fr^t the n.^^. gen^^ 



Ortober JI9. 2006 
November2,2006 
NovemberJI6^20q6 
Noyember9^06^ 
Sept^M06__ 
October 5. 2006_^ 
^Sept^H2006__ 
Sept 21, 20 06 



147 



Sept28J006^ 
Sept. 28, 2006 



148 



The fresnman ireaKoui. inci... ..=... =. a-—--"::^--^^-— rr^^^^ 
The spirit of giving cornes to aarionin_pre^^ 

These campus shouldnlg«Djjnnoticed^ 



149 



150 



151 



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1 nese campus &iiuuiuMjjj««-ij^-rr — — — - — zi^:izr^i7^TJp 
WdlHTnuainii^GhostAOfClanori^walkingto^^^^^ 

T^toring^enterre^^e^^ 

United Way hosts 5K _ jz^^i;^ 

Venango c^mjustoholdforunv^^ 



November2^^006^ 
Sept 28, 2006 



October 26, 2006 



October 19, 2006 



Isslvolleyball down lUP 3-2 



SeptHJ200^_ 
November 9, 2006 



4 
5 
1 



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2 

1 



12 



11 



12 



9 



October 19, 2006 



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1. 
7 



Carlson Library 
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0^ Pennsylvania 



Clarion Call Sept.- December 2006 



154 



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164 



165 



Volleyball falls to Kutztown in playoffs ' 

Volleyball goes undefeated in Clarion Daysjnn Tournament ~ 

Volleyball heads into last match of season 

Volleyball. Fries named PSAC-West player of the week 

Volunteer opportunity in "Pathways to Prom" program 

Walczak, Alexander, stresses importance of last year's Doverlriar 

Women's basketball drops two on the road 

Women's Basketball falls to Ashland 

Women's Basketballhophg for playoff run 

Wrestling gears up for Penn Duals ~ 

Yenerall. Kevan: CUP professor publishedFa^adernictextbooir" 
YouTube allows users to share personal video with the world 



B 



November 16, 2006 
October 12, 2006 
October 26, 2006 
Sept. 14, 2006 __ 
October 26, 2006 
November 9, 2006 
December 7, 2006 
November 30, 2006 
November 16, 2006 
November 16, 2006 
October 5, 2006 



9 
10 



9 



10 



November 9, 2006 



12 

11 

10 

%^ 

1 

4 



I 

t 



Fae^book gmH cr#«py- 

See "Entertainment" page 6 




Montreal College Shooting- 

1 killed, 1 9 injured see "News- page 2 



One copy free 



Inside fantasy football- 
see "Features" page 5 



THEC 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 





NCALL 



Volume 93 Issue 1 




,\ 



WaWnglWi fkm News Sefvk» 

U^., Isiael CKXN to pm- 
posed Palosttnten ur% 

WASHINGTON- 
Secretary of State 
Ck>ndoleez2a Rice and 
Israeli Foreign Minister 
Tripi livni reacted skep- 
tically Wednesday to a 
proposed unity 

Palestinian government 
that included Hamas, 
aaying the militant group 
must first renounce ter- 
rorism and accept lasaers 
right to exist before a ban 
on international aid can 
be lifted. 

House republicans 
return focxjs to immi- 
gration 

WASHINGTON- House 
Republicans on 

Wednesday launched a 
renewed bid to stiffen 
border security and rally 
voters, unveiling a bill 
that would mandate con- 
struction of 700 miles of 
fencing in highly populat- 
ed areas along the U.S. 
border with Mexico. 

U mmen accHised of 
kiliingtrensientmen 
LOS ANGELES - Two 
women accused of lolling 
transient men to collect 
life insurance money 
pleaded not guilty in Los 
Angeles Superior Court 
on Wednesday. 

Helen Golay, 75, of 
Santa Monica, and Olga 
Rutterschmidt, 73, of Los 
Angeles are accused of 
murdering Paul Vados, 
73, and Kenneth 
McDavid, 60. Vados was 
covered by more than a 
dozen insurance poUcies 
when he was hit by a car 
on La Brea Avenue in 
1^©. McDavid was cov- 
ered by 23 policies when 
he was killed by a car last 
year in Westwood. 

House GOP dela^ 

funding for 

911 emergency com- 

munlcatton 

WASHINGTON - House 
Republicans are blocking 
an attempt to spend $3,1 
billion to help the 
nation's police and fire 
agencies communicate in 
emei^ncies as Congress 
debates a proposed over- 
haul of the Federal 
Emergency Management 
Agency. 

As both parties inten- 
sified the election-seawn 
rhetoric over national 
security, Democrats 

accused GOP leaders of 
shortchanging the well- 
documented need to 
improve communication 
between first responders. 

Homeland Security 
Secretary Michael 

Chertoff rebuffed calls for 
dedicated federal p«nts 
to upgrade equipment, 
coordinate plans, train 
emer^ncy workers and 
adapt a>mmM) technol<^ 
ttandai^. 



CU spotlights student bloggers 



^ 



September 14, 2006 



Adam Mohney 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

3_ajmohney®cl8rion,eclu 

Prior to this semester, 
eight members of the 
Clarion University commu- 
nity began to write online 
blogs for a program started 
by the Admissions office. 

Six Clarion University 
students, one volunteer fac- 
ulty member, and Assistant 
Director of Admissions, Jake 
Yale, have been writing 
blogs aimed at potential 
Clarion students. 

A link to the Spotlight 
Student Bloggers can be 
found on Clarion 

University's website. 

Yale, the creator of the 
Spotlight Student Bloggers 
and a 2000 graduate of 
Clarion University, said the 
goal is to get prospective 
students to come to the 
Clarion University website. 

"This is a live, constant- 
ly changing thing that hope- 
fully can get students at 
high schools we visit to come 
to our website, and then 
come back again to see 
what's new. If they come see 
the Spotlight Student 



Bloggers, they might do 
something else like apply 
online or set up a tour, and 
that is the goal," Yale said. 
The early stages of the 



dents have been interacting 
with the bloggers. "The 
results have been very posi- 
tive so far. I have only had to 
refuse two comments from 



least one entry a week dur- 
ing the semester. 

As a reward, each stu- 
dent who holds up to the 
contract will receive an iPod 



m 



bt Student 



^ 



N«w for FoN 200«! 




IHIff4 flA ^^^Ht^^^^L. 







C«n1 S»« th« Movi*'' 



HMH^imm 



Tt.« H««Mn« t^iMMW w(*hm4 »v Til* 1^*«,|M tliMvM •)»««<• t„ R.t emmM 




Spotlight Student Bloggers 
have been very successful. 
Yale said the blogs had over 
3500 hits within the first 
two weeks of school. Both 
prospective and current stu- 



visitors," he said. 

The Spotlight Student 
Bloggers also have incen- 
tives to keep up with the 
blogs. Each of the bloggers 
signed a contract to write at 



at the semester's 
according to Yale. 



United Way hosts 5K 



See "BLOG" 
continued on page 2. 



Natalie Kennell 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_nekennell®clarion.edu 

On Saturday, Sept. 30 at 
9 a.m.. Clarion County 
United Way and Tunnelton 
Liquids Company will host 
the 22nd annual 5K race in 



Knepp, Intramural 

Recreation Fitness Director 
at Clarion says, "We con- 
tributed last year as well. 
It's a good opportunity to get 
students more involved in 
athletic and community 
activity. It makes it more 
feasible for students to par- 



ACES provides 
opportunity for CUP 




Shakira O'Neil 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_sjoneil9clarion.edu 

Clarion University has 
choosen to take part in the 
American China Exchange 
Society program, which 
recruits students from high 
schools in China and pro- 
vides Clarion students 
international opportunities. 

The American China 
Exchange Society is a pro- 
gram that provides students 
from China with the oppor- 
tunity to come to America 
and pursue either an under- 
graduate or graduate 



Enrollment Management; 
Linda Heineman; and Dr. 
Sandra Trejos, Associate 
Professor of Economics and 
Study Abroad Coordinator. 

The ideas that were up 
for discussion were future 
cooperative agreements 
between Clarion University 
and the high school, a stu- 
dent exchange program, 
graduate students visiting 
China to teach EngUsh, and 
undergraduate students 
possibly doing their student 
teaching in China. 

In Oct. 2005 members of 
Clarion facility, which 



Plioto emirtosy ct Pam Zahoran 
Free Ice amim - This Turkey Hill display will be present at the 
event, which will hand out free ice cream. 



Clarion to benefit the 
Fitzgerald Ramp Project. 

The course will run from 
Main Street, around Clarion 
University Campus, and 
end with a lap around the 
University track. 

Registration begins at 
7:30 a.m. at the Clarion 
Stadium, and the race is 
open to runners or walkers 
of all ages. 

Pam Zahoran, executive 
director at United Way said, 
'The overall goal is to have 
250 to 300 runners, which 
will rise over $3,000 for the 
Fitzgerald Ramp Fund." 

The proceeds go to the 
foundation to build 10 to 12 
new handicap ramps for 
individuals in need. 

Zohoran said, "Based on 
last year's attendance, we 
feel that this year the 
United Way of Clarion 
County will be a success." 

The cost is $15 per par- 
ticipant and high school and 
college teams can receive a 
group rate of $12 per run- 
ner. The Clarion University 
intramural program has 
offered to pay for half of the 
entry fee for students. Doug 



ticipate." 

Six cash prizes, totaling 
$1,200, will be awarded to 
the top three male and 
female winners, and medals 
will be presented to winners 
in different age groups. In 
addition, the first 250 
entrants receive free long 
sleeved t-shirts, breakfast 
donated by Sheetz, bever- 
ages from Wal-Mart and 
fruit fi:om the Clarion Fruit 
Company. Free ice cream 
will be provided to all par- 
ticipants and spectators 
compliments of Turkey Hill 
Ice Cream. 

Christopher Clark, 
Clarion student and mem- 
ber of the university cross 
country team, participated 
in the race last year and 
plans to do so this year as 
well. He said, "Last years 
race was a lot of fun. It was 
a great opportunity for our 
team to do something with 
the community, not to men- 
tion race our roach. The set- 
up and atmosphere were 
fantastic. Everyone was pos- 
itive and supportive of each 
other" 




CourtMy of tiM Newawira 
A(XS f^rtlclf^nts-Educators and students are currently 
Involved in the American China Exchange Society. 



degree. 

The program was origi- 
nally started at Lock Haven 
University of Pennsylvania 
and was then instated at 
Clarion. 

A group of five high 
school teachers which 
included Huimin Zhu, 
Tianjin Haihai High School; 
Lijun Yang and Haikun, 
experimental Middle/ High 
school of Beijing University; 
and principal, Li Fang, 
came to Clarion to visit and 
get some of their ideas for 
the exchange program. 

They met with faculty 
members such as President, 
Joseph Grunenwald; Dr. 
Jocelind Gant, Dean of 



included Dr. Sarah Bower, 
the Dean of the College of 
Business Administration 
and Gant, visited Shanghai 
High School. 

"Already there are 11 
students, the majority who 
are in the College of Arts 
and Sciences and the 
College of Business 
Administration who are 
pursuing undergraduate 
degrees, and we hope to 
increase the numbers of peo- 
ple who are here from ACES 
as well as admissions of 
Chinese students to the uni- 
versity," said Gant. 

See "ACES" 
continued on page 2. 



Annual 
Clarion 

begins 
Sept. 30 



Krystal Finkbeiner 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



end, 



Clarion County will 
kick off the 2006 Autumn 
Leaf Festival on Sept. 30 
which will run until Oct. 8. 
For students and resi- 
dents that live in Clarion, 
Sept. 30 is one of the many 
dates marked down on the 
calendar. 

This year, A.L.F. 
includes bake sales, coun- 
try line dancing, fire- 
works, karaoke, a pep 
rally, a football game and 
of course the announce- 
ment of the Clarion 
University King and 
Queen of 2006. During the 
week of A.L.F, Miss Teen 
of A.L.F will be 
announced, and awarded a 
scholarship. Craft shows, 
give-a-ways and even 
rummage sales will be fea- 
tured as well. 

The event which 
attracts the most specta- 
tors, the parade, will be 
Saturday, Oct. 7. The 
parade will feature cars 
representing local shops. 
Clarion County dancers, 
bands, and veterans, and 
the homecoming court. 

Sophomore, Carly 
Willy said, "Thd dance 
team does their routine 
throughout the parade." 

In addition, many 
sororities and fraternities 
are doing their job and giv- 
ing back to the community 
as well. Zeta Tau Alpha is 
participating in giving 
back to those who have, 
fought or surged breast 
cancer. 

"We are having a 
booth for people to donate 
money, and all the pro- 
ceeds go towards breast 
cancer and in return they 
receive a bracelet and a 
ribbon," said Zeta Tau 
Alpha member, Kelsey 
Zimmerman. 

Along with booths, 
there will be floats made 
by organizations showing 
off their creative side and 
school spirit. 

There will also be 
activities and displays 
that wiU be held through- 
out the entire week. 

The Clarion County 
Junior Arts Council All 
County Art Show will be 
held all week at Kate's 
Frame and Art Gallery. 

There wiU also be an 
on going art show and 
sale. 

Airplane rides, and a 
model raiht)ad display are 
among the many other fea- 
tures of A.L.F. that wiU 
last throughout the week. 
A.L.F. will close out its 
festivities with a motor- 
cyle show and a tractor 
show on Saturday, Oct. 8. 



Pjflc2 



Im^ 



Tm cajiRiQiir ciiLL 



September 13. 2006 



SAFE begins training for volunteers 



Brittnee Koebler 
News Editor 

•_b«Koebier«clarion.«du 

Kelly PennisI 
C/ar/onCa// Staff Writer 

s_kpennWttciarlon.edu 

SAFE, coordinated by 
co-director, Kimber 

McHenry, begins training 
sessions Sept. 14, at 1302 
East Main St., Clarion, Pa. 

A program that reaches 
out to victims of abuse, 
SAFE, is an acronym for 
Stop Abuse for Everyone. 

The program involves 
training volunteers to be 
prepared to help victims 
before, during, and after an 
occurrence of violence. 

Formal training ses- 
sions run twice a year in the 
fall and early spring. The 



sessions run about eight 
weeks and there are two 
sessions each week. 

During training the vol- 
unteers will be introduced to 
situations, visuals, videos 
and handson experience in 
order to prepare them for 
when they become certified. 

According to the SAFE 
brochure, "Any individual 
(volunteer or stafiD who pro- 
vides direct services to vic- 
tims of domestic violence 
and their children, needs to 
have successfully completed 
specialized training con- 
ducted by SAFE staff." 

The SAFE program is 
made up of three compo- 
nents. The first component 
is direct service, which 
refers to the 24-hour hotline 
and counseling services. 

The second component 
is community education. 



"BLOG" continued 
from front page 

"They are not allowed to 
talk about drugs, drinking 
or sexual content. We want 
this to be based more on 
their student lives than on 
their personal lives. So, we 
don't edit the blogs aside 
from the comments, but the 
students know what is 
acceptable," Yale said. 

Yale says the project 
was created as a means for 
expansion. "We are always 
trying to increase our stu- 
dent population and 
increase the budget. I 
thought this would be a 
good way to get students 
who might be sitting on the 
fence between Clarion and 
another school to perhaps 
pick Clarion," Yale said. 

"I don't think this is 



Gunmen opens fire 
In Montreal 
College, killing one 



Doug Struck 

Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

At 12:45 p.m., on Wed., 
Sept. 13, in the school cafe- 
teria of Dawson College, 
when a man opened fire, 
killing 1 and injuring 19. 

A young man dressed in 
black opened fire with a rifle 
before he was killed by 
police, according to witness- 
es and police. 

Authorities would not 
say Wednesday evening 
whether there were more 
gunmen. 

Witnesses described at 
least one and possibly more 
shooters, but police said 
they could not confirm that. 
Police closed off the col- 
lege, an adjoining shopping 
center, and office tower, and 
remained crouched with 
guns drawn late. 

At least eight of those 
wounded were in critical 
condition, according to an 
official at the Montreal 
General Hospital. 

One student told CNN 
he saw the gunman shoot at 
least three students, includ- 
ing a woman who was hit in 
the arm and leg. 

"He (»uld have been a 
student," the witness said, 
describing a young man 
about 19 or 20 yeai^ old who 
was wearing a black trench 
coat and had a "punk" 
appearance. 

Marous said he ran for 
his life when the shooting 
started, with the gunman 



yards behind him. 'There 
was chaos, chaos," he said. 

He said the gunman 
came into a second-floor 
cafeteria "out of nowhere" 
and fired several shots. At 
one point, the gunman shot 
people who were lying on( 
the floor as police came into 
the cafeteria to corner him, 
said the witness, who did 
not give his name. 

Sober Marous, a stu- 
dent, told Canadian televi- 
sion that the shooter, wear- 
ing army boots, started his 
attack outside the college 
and continued it inside. 
"He said nothing," Marous 
said. "He had a stone-cold 
face. There was nothing on 
his face. He didn't say any- 
thing. He didn't yell out any 
slogans or anything. He just 
started opening fire. He was 
a cold-blooded killer." 

Montreal's police chief, 
Yvan Delorme, said 
Wednesday afternoon that 
one gunman was dead 
'^through police interven- 
tion," and said he could not 
say whether there were 
other attackers. 

Dawson College is a 
post-secondary college 
preparatory school with 
about 10,000 teen-age stu- 
dents. 

The shooting recalled a 
similar event, in 1989, when 
a 25-year-old man left a note 
against feminists and 
opened fire at the Ecole 
Polytechnique de Montreal. 
He killed 14 women before 
killing himself. 



which educates people about 
the types of abuse. McHenry 
often visits schools to speak 
to children about abuse. 
This is also a vital way that 
the public is made aware of 
the availability of assistance 
to victims. 

The final component, 
systems advocacy, main- 
tains contact with medical, 
welfare and human service 
agencies. 

SAFE aides to all indi- 
viduals who are abused or 
battered and in need of 
assistance. 

The organization SAFE 
is governed by volunteers 
that make up a Board of 
Directors. The program is 
also guided through the 
management of other volun- 
teers and professional staff. 

The services of SAFE 
are free and confidential 



and there is no discrimina- 
tion of race, color, creed, age, 
income, religion, sexual ori- 
entation, origin of nationafi- 
ty, any disability or ances- 
try. 

As previously men- 
tioned, the 24 Hour Hothne 
provides supportive hsten- 
ing and crisis intervention if 
necessary. When interven- 
tion is needed, SAFE may 
arrange shelter and trans- 
portation for the victim. 

SAFE is constantly look- 
ing for volunteers and is 
willing to train these indi- 
viduals free of cost. 

Director, Cheryl Miller 
said, "SAFE receives one 
intern a year and several 
work studies students." 

SAFE was founded in 
1982 by members of the 
League of Women Voters. 



going to be a mind-changing 
thing. It's basically a low 
scale project that could 
spark some interest in our 
Web site, and then hopefully 
our university." 

The Spotlight Student 
Bloggers have found the 
experience enjoyable as 
well. Junior secondary 
English education major 
Monica Mellon says, "It's 
been fun to learn about blog- 
ging and have my friends 
and professors tell me they 
have read my blog." Many 
students involved in the 
project beUeve that it has 
enhanced their social life on 
campus. 

Students are not the 
only ones blogging on the 
Web site. Professor Kenneth 
J. Staub has also been 
active in the program. "I 
hope to provide a professor's 
perspective on university 



life throughout the academ- 
ic year," Staub says. Though 
Staub is the only professor 
at the university who active- 
ly blogs for the Spotlight 
Student Bloggers, Yale says 
he hopes to expand the pro- 
gram for faculty. "Several 
teachers have expressed an 
interest in the blogs so i am 
thinking about expanding 
that element." 

Yale says that anyone 
can start a blog on 
Blogger.com, which is the 
program the university uses 
for the blogs, but he does not 
plan to expand the number 
of students who blog for 
Clarion University by much. 

Yale does not intend to 
extend the program to the 
entire campus because of 
control issues. "I don't want 
this to become a Myspace or 
Facebook of sorts. We want 
to choose active, well achiev- 



ing students who are going 
to represent Clarion 
University well," he said. 

Yale says the process is 
still an experiment. "We def- 
initely are going to do this 
again for the Spring semes- 
ter, but after that I'm not 
sure. I guess we'll just have 
to see how things are going 
with it," he said. 

Spotlight Student 

Bloggers for the Spring 
semester will be chosen 
through faculty recommen- 
dations, as they were this 
semester, and also by recom- 
mendations from the Fall 
semester bloggers. Yale says 
he wants students who are 
actively involved with vari- 
ous activities on campus. He 
also said he hopes the cam- 
pus becomes more involved 
in the interactive aspect of 
the project. 



"ACES" continued 
from frontpage 

He also added that the 
students are advised on 
what is appropriate. 

The program is funded by 
the exchange students. 
"International students cur- 
rently pay the highest rate 
of tuition among all Clarion 



University students, includ- 
ing out of state students." 
Gant said. 

Clarion University and 
ACES are looking to estab- 
lish an EngUsh as a Second 
Language Program, for all 
incoming students that need 
to become proficient in 
English. They are anticiapt- 
ing this program by the 
summer of 2007. 



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ill criminal 

iiiv-wiij;.iiii'ii^ M?i «.ijn(n.!<;u.>u rjy I fi'j \ idsioti University 
Pnhlic Safptv for thf month of SepttMnber/ August 2006, 
l)e acce»ised on the Public Safety 
Web page, 

m Sept 3, at 8:56 a.ia. a vehicle was stopped for driv- 
ing through a "do art enter" area in lot 12. The drivef 
had an crfor of alrohol on his breath and failed a PBT 
it»t. Charpa aw pending blood results. 

■ Sei i at 1:30 a.m., a vehicte wai stopped for run- 
ning through a red light at 8th avenue and Wood St., 
and for having tinted windows, Tlbe driver had a strong 
smell of alcohol on his breath, hlmd shot eyes, and 
slurred speech. He also faUed two of three sobreity 
tests. Charts are pending blood results. 

n Aug, 30. at 11:30 p.m., vechicle keys were stolen fi-om 
the ceramic shop. University police are investigating. 
Anyone with any information should contact Univeraity 
pohce. 

m Jay Ivanco, 18, of MonroevjUe, Pa., was issued a cita- 
tioa for underage consumption of alchohoi when the 
vehicle he was in was pulled over in lot 5 on Aug. 30 at 
12:39 a.m. 

m Jason Krimsky, 18, of Monroeviile, Pa, was issued a 
citation for underage consumption of alchohoi wh«n the 
vehicle he was in was puUed over in lot 5 on Aug. 30 at 
12:39 a.m. 

m Aug. 30, at 9:35 p.m., an iPod was stolen from the 
Recreation Center. University Police are investigating. 

I, between the hours of 12 a.m. and 2:80 a.m. 

Sno^XTi intoxicated male enter a resident's n»m in 

Wilkinson Hall, and grabbed a female resident and 

fused to leave when ordered by residents. Cha-ges 

pending. 

Natalie Su.sk«, 20, was arrested in Givan Hall on an 
arrest warrant issued by the State Pohee of the Butler 
station on drug-related issues. Suska was taken into 
custody by Univeraity pohce and released into custody 
of the State police. 



• Aug. 27, at iriO a.m., an individual reported the 
theft of money from his credit card account. 

■ ZschAr.- Rennett. 19, of New Kenainfton. Pa., was 
<^' ■ cidraitted to drinking akohol when pohce 

ptoppea him on ihe sidewalk between Marwick-Boyd 
a r. ' ^ • ' i-creational Center. 



Si 

b> 
wai.-. 

'A. 

c 



khois, 18. of Ixjwer Burrell, Pa., was stopped 

ity police at i:34 a.m. for driving on the side- 

;ciween Marwick-Boyd and the Recreation 

KwhnU was found to have been drinking and 

.tody for driving under the influence. 

■ ficSing lab results. 




■ Brett Cherok, 18, of Lower Burrell, Pa., admitted to 
drinking alcohol on Aug. 26 at 2:02 a.m. 

■ Robert Woods, 18, of New Kensington, Pa., admitted 
to driflk'"'' "'cohol on Aug. 26 at 2:20 a.m. 

■ Edw ! lin, 24, ran a stop «%n on a bicycle and 
entered the roadway in front of a vehicle on Aug. 19 at 
1:40 a.m. Carlm was under the ir^uence of alcohol and 
was cited for public drunkeimess and a stop sign viola 

tion. 



m ri«™i, M.r^r..^^ 20, of Butler, Pa., was stopped for an 

n on Aug. 22 at 12 a.m. on Wood St. 

11 Ave. ThMUfh investigation the officer found 

was wanted in Elizabeth Ibwnship for 

... fraud. McCance was detained on the 

-ant and turned over to the Eli^beth Police 



"Kttsbu^h, Pa., was found siftok- 
ri dance floor during a dance ia 
on Aug. 23. Price was escorted out 
uiid to be in pMesMon of maryuania. 

is found passed out on a bench in 

art at im am. on Aug. 24, Jussila was 

De iritoxicated and was cited for pubUc drunk* 



i»0ain)< 



llfck, 



aphemalia, pub- 

i 



'B- ^1 H-l ^'Ui 



ivestigation and 
ttiti-ges are pending Erie lab result*. 



itember 14. 2006 




TgicmiowaiLL 



Page 3 



Editorial, Lrtlffi to \k Mitor iUil fall on Ity 



A summer of Southern Hospitality 




Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_aedent9clarion.edu 

WKile most people spent 
the dog days of summer 
slaving away at the same 
old jobs they do every sum- 
mer, I can proudly inform 
everyone that I spent my 
summer basking in the sun 
and learning all about true 
Southern Hospitahty. 

The spur of the moment 
decision to move to Mso-tle 
Beach, S.C. came about this 
past March. My boyfriend, 
Nick, said that he has 
always wanted to spend a 
summer at the beach. I, on 
the other hand, am a home- 
body mama's girl, but I 
excitedly agreed that mov- 
ing away would be a blast! 

We went down for a visit 
over Easter break (I beheve 
that this was my first real 
experience). It was the first 
time that I had ever been to 
Msotle Beach, let alone my 
first time that far south in a 
long time. 

Nick and I were on our 
way back to our car from the 



beach when I was 
approached by a black lab 
puppy Being the animal 
lover that I am, I began pet- 
ting the puppy while talking 
to her owner. At the end of 
the conversation, the man 
shook my hand and said, 
with the biggest smile I've 
ever seen, "Nice to meet you! 
Thank you for your time!" 

I was shocked that this 
man had said this to me. I 
mean, "Nice to meet you," I 
get that. '*rhank you for 
your time!" are you serious?! 
I have never had a random 
person teU me that other 
than in an interview. C'mon 
now! 

I can say that one thing 
I picked up from this 
Southern Hospitality was 
saying "ma'am," "sir" and, of 
course the most famous 
phrase, "ya'U." It is amazing 
how nice people are when 
treated with courtesy and 
respect. 

I learned my lesson very 
quickly while waiting tables 
that Southerners hate the 
"damn Yankees." I quickly 



adapted to this by develop- 
ing a slight accent that 
would disguise my 
Pittsburghese enough that 
no one would know until I 
slipped up and said some- 
thing Uke "gum band." I was 
very proud of myself, consid- 
ering that I was born and 
raised in Western Pa. My 
new way of talking had 
some of my guests placing 
bets on where I was from. 

Of course there is 
always the typical redneck, 
and I'm not talking about 
the northern rednecks, oh 
no! These rednecks are from 
a whole other world! 
Southern Hospitality does 
not apply to this particular 
group of people whatsoever. 
I was once told that 
there are about a milhon 
different t5TJes of rednecks 
and I ne/er understood that 
until this summer. I had one 
guy who paid for his family 
(him, his wife and two kids). 
Now granted, the restau- 
rant I worked at wasn't 
cheap, but it wasn't fine din- 
ing either. The man's check 
was $72 and anyone else 
would've thought this was 
the end of the world! 

Not only did he complain 
to me, my manager and any- 
one else that would listen 
about it, but he only left me 
a $1 tip. Moral of the story: 
Don't order a $10 drink, an 
appetizer and four meals. 

TTiere were also the rod- 
necks who believed that 



they were the richest people 
ever. They would come in 
ten deep with about two 
hundred dollars in gift 
cards! 

Despite these particular 
instances, my summer was 
the best I've ever had. I real- 
ly think that evei^ person 
should move to the beach for 
a summer. It is an amazing 
experience. I made some 
great friends and I learned a 
lot. Oh, by the way, did I 
mention that I made thou- 
sands of dollars? 

Next summer, don't 
think long and hard about 
leaving the tri-state area, 
just go! At first, I found 
about a milUon reasons not 
to go, but now, I cannot even 
think of one reason that I 
would not go back. Finding 
a job down there was easier 
than finding a job in my 
hometown. 

I wouldn't take back the 
decision at all. It was fabu- 
lous! So drop the 
Pittsbuiirhese and adapt to 
southern living. Want 
another reason? Think 
about waking up every 
morning and being able to 
go to the beach... EVERY- 
DAY! I can't give ya'll any 
more reasons, just take my 
word for it. 



The author ia a 30phomore 
communication me^or and 
Entertainment Editor of 
The Call. 




THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gtmfwil ^^Nt Camplm 

Clarton Unhws^ ^ P^m^ni» 

ClartfNi,Mirai4 

Wwn»;814-3»3.23W Fw: 814-3t3-2IS? 

Web: rta^ncat.clinon.rty i-trnW. m^^^i.^ 

Qcectittw Board 
2W6-2007 



idMof-in-Chtef 

Tina Slclttor, 
Managing Editor 

Brtttnot Itodbtor, 
Hvm Editor 

Sttphanl© D^mond, 
Faaturw Editor 

Erie iowser, 
Sporte idltof 



Amy Kayior, 
Business Mana^r 

Michael Balchln, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Shasta Kurti, 
Graphics Editor 

Smh Doran, 
Online Editor 

Sarah Oant, 
Entartalnmant Editor 



The Entertainment Industry's lazy summer 



Adrienne Cain 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_acain9ciarion.edu 

I usually think of 
"Entertain me!" as the 
expected cry of a spoiled 
child or willful princess, or 
the cry of girls who wear 
"Spoiled" and "Brat" shirts 
and somehow don't realize 
that those are bad things to 
be. Nonetheless, I don't 
think asking the entertain- 
ment industry, specifically 
the movie industry to 
"entertain me" should be a 
lot to ask, even during the 
summer when the season is 
slow. Between work, con- 
certs, friends and various 
other obligations, I man- 
aged to see eight films in the 
theater from May through 
August. I usually expect 
that for every eight films I 
see, two will be good or 
great, three will be okay, 
and the last three will be 
bad. 

As I look at my ticket 
stubs from the summer, 
chronologically arranged 
before me, I really have to 
wonder: What happened to straightforward 
the really good movies? Or 
even worse: When did 
movies stop trying? 

The first movie of the 
summer I saw was "Stick 
It." I didn't want to see the 
film in the first place but I 
was overruled three to one 
and "Stick It" was the win- 
ner. Going into the film with 
only poor expectations, I 
was at least pleasantly sur- 
prised. It wasn't ground- 
breaking or particularly 
clever, but it was at least 
mildly entertaining. 

Continuing my trend of 
being forced into movies, I 
saw "The BreakUp" next. 
Personally, I was eyeing up 
"X-Men: The Last Stand" 
because at least when comic 
book films lack good dia- 
logue or story they usuaUy 
still have great effects to 
praiM. "The Break-Up," you 



might imagine, is about a 
break-up. Watching two peo- 
ple break up on screen is 
about as emotionally inter- 
esting as watching two 
strangers break up on the 
street and at least in real 
life, people aren't burdened 
by scripted humor. You may 
even enjoy a real life break 
up, especially if it is in the 
right aisle of the store. 

The next film to let me 
down was "Nacho Libre" 
which failed at being the 
winsome underdog that 
"Napoleon Dynamite" was, 
while simultaneously man- 
aging to damage any serious 
credibility Jack Black may 
have gained from "King 
Kong." I may have Uked it if 
I were a thirteen-yearold 
boy with a love of excrement 
and flatulence related jokes 
but as it was, I missed the 
boat on the humor factor. I 
had only myself to blame for 
that choice. 

What can I say about 
"Scary Movie 4?" Not quite 
as good as "Scary Movie 3," 
but better than the original 
"Scary Movie." The "Scary 
Movie" series is at least 
in what 
they plan to do, which is 
simply mock the most popu- 
lar horror films since the 
last installment. With the 
way the horror industry is 
going, it's not a particularly 
hard task to handle. I saw 
this at the two dollar the- 
ater in Boardman, Oh. and 
got my money's worth. 

Then came the indus- 
try's crowning jewel of the 
summer "Pirates of the 
Caribbean: Dead Man's 
Chest." This time around. 
Pirates fell prey to both 'the 
curse of the sequel' and 'the 
curse of two movies that 
could have been one.' You 
may not have heard of the 
latter curse but think of it 
as the Klinefelter's 
Syndrome (Gbogle it) of the 
movie industry. It's not 
always obvious, we may not 
aU talk about it, but it exists 



just the same. Following the 
success of '"Pirates of the 
Caribbean: Curse of the 
Black Pearl," the industry 
spawned out another 
installment that was 
stretched out enough to 
make into two separate 
films. This isn't to say that 
the plot or even the acting 
was bad, but apparently 
when you stretch out a plot 
that much, the only thing to 
fill in the extra time is slap- 
stick and special effects. I'll 
pay to see the third install- 
ment, but only because I 
need closure. 

I'm sure that by this 
point, you are weary, tired 
and wondering if I saw any- 
thing really worthwhile. M. 
Night Shyamalan's latest 
film, "Lady in the Water," 
was the next film I saw. Did 
that answer your question? 
Striking a strange balance 
between whimsy and horror 
is a hard task that 
Shyamalan doesn't quite 
manage to pull off. Perhaps 
it is the fact that since he is 
known for his plot twists, I 
spend most of the film look- 
ing for that critical moment. 
Maybe I was distracted by 
the fact that Shyamalan 
cast himself as the savior of 
the world. Or maybe it was 
the fact that Shyamalan 
bemoans the evils of movie 
criticism within a movie in 
the most obvious (exposition 
all the way) manner. 
Despite all of its shortcom- 
ings, though, I liked "Lady 
in the Water." The fairytale 
surreaUsm, the colorful 
characters, the strange pac- 
ing - I liked it all. I'd never 
call it a really great film but 
I liked it the way I'd like a 
puppy with a limp, wounded 
but compelling. 

The other big box office 
opener of that weekend was 
"Clerks II," which I was 
excited to see. Not everj'- 
thing Kevin Smith does is 
sohd and fun, but I've had a 
very good success rate with 
his films. I loved the original 



"Clerks" and hoped that the 
sequel would hold up to it. 
It's more vulgar and more 
sentimental this time 
around but maintains the 
flavor of the original. I spent 
the film being amused, not 
just by the plot and the act- 
ing, but by the sheer show of 
the Kevin Smith touch. 
When the cast launches into 
a choreographed dance 
number, I don't pause for a 
second. Like seeing a good 
friend get ahead, it warms 
my heart-place to look up 
and see a pricy number 
being done on screen just 
because it can be done. 

I saw 'Tulse" because of 
a sick disease I have that 
requires me to see every 
originally Japanese film 
that America muddles its 
way through. It was pretty 
easy to know what was 
going to happen. Ringu is 
better than "The Ring, Ju- 
on" is better than The 
Grudge, the Japanese "Dark 
Water" is better than the 
American one, and "Kairo" 
was better than the 
American remake "Pulse." 
Pulse rehes almost entirely 
on unclean college apart- 
ments and flickering light- 
ing for suspense and creepi- 
ness. Please don't mind our 
heroine Kristen Bell, she's 
using all of her acting skills 
trying to cry, but will be 
back soon with her bland 
confvised performance. Out 
in the Ughted world. Pulse 
fails to attach any creepy 
stigma to my life the way a 
good horror film should. I 
came out not wondering if 
such a thing could happen to 
me, but rather how it could 
happen to anyoiM. 

Fm sure that here you 
are just waiting to contra- 
dict me. You'll say that eight 
movies are not enough to 
really show how good or bad 
movies have been lately. I 
would most likely agree 
with you there, but remem- 
ber, these are the "big hita' rf 
the summer. Tliese are the 



Or. Susan Hilton 
Adviser 



Staff 

bum* Natalie Kennelt. Keliy P6nn)$l, Mmm Mohney, 
snakira O'Neii, Krystai Finkbeiner fflrtHPift; Oant«ile 
Sutchertne, Oeidra Korreii Enfewrarimw at: Dommic 
Giallombardo, EmSiy Aaron, Robyn Gray, Grace R8pHaga<}o 
SBfiltK Chris Parks, Robert Rankin Cony Bdmnf : Michele 
Straub, Nicole Soveird Advartiatefe Lauren Couch, Courtney 
Kroi, Jenna Peno, Mike Smith JfelHsifig; Sarah SielsKi, 
Stephanie Corso, Shawn Turner W id tefM phY a f^ tf f^fflitftf^ 
Bethany Ross, Mike Cauve!, Misha Snyder, Jenifer Poblete, 
Phil DfeUck, Thomas Fair, Ben EIHot Ctycm^Bot^ ^\c Levy,,, 
Allison Kerr, Nicole Lawrence, John Btumer, Ryan Bridf^, , 
Bryan Birigham 




Poiici^ 



The Ciarton Calf is the studerit-n/n newspaper of Claric 
fSity of Pennsyivania and the surrourtcfiiig conirttunities. TH 
i puttlished most Thursdays during the academic yea». 

The Editors accept submiasions from ail sources, but reser 
the right to edit for libel, gramma.--, length, punctuation and obsc« , 
ity; ths determination of which is the respotislbtlity of the Eortor-id 
Chief. 

Subrrtissions must be signed and include contact inforrr 
They must be received no ialer than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the i 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation, 

information kroxes (including PSAs) ^re published only tJased 
on available space and at the discretion of the Fxecutlve 
Publication 's not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn j» print co-curricular a« 1 
merYit^ar of The Call staff. They should scltedule theit co-curricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsl- 
Oilities for the entire semester wii! be granted a coxurrrcular. 

The Clarion Call is funded ^ advertising revenue ar»d the 
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The Call is available on campt^ and throughout Qarton. Om 
copy IS free,- additional copies are $1,00. 



Opinions Bxprmsed in thte 
publlcBOon are thorn of Um writer or 
speaker, and do nt^ rmi^mirtfy reflect 
the oplnkmsofUm nevmmper staff , si 
dent bwfy, Clarion Unhmrslty or ^e coi 
munlty. 




big-name-theater-nearyou 
films that are supposed to 
represent the best that 
funding can bring. Instead 
of originality, in most of 
these you find the same for- 
mulaic writing and rehance 
on stereotypes that fills 
mass market fiction and 
romance novels. Outside of 
small theaters, it is hard to 
find a truly original or 
clever film anymore. Sure 
the films can be entertain- 
ing but when every trip to 
the movies costs between 
$7-9, you have to really won- 
der if you are getting your 
money's worth from the 
deal. The movie industry 
direly needs some fresh 
ideas. They are starting to 
run out of political events, 
comic books, sports stories, 
Japanese horror remakes, 
and sequels to lifelessly 
exploit. Is it really too much 
to ask the entertainment 
industry to really entertain 
us? 




Calling all 
students! 



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Page 2 



lews 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



September 13. 2006 



TIffi CLAHION CALL 



SAFE begins training for volunteers 



Brittnee Koebler 
News Editor 

s_ bekoeblerflclanon.edu 

Kelly Pennisi 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kpennisi®clarion.edu 

SAFE, coordinated by 
co-director, Kimber 

McHenry, begins training 
sessions Sept. 14, at 1302 
East Main St., Clarion, Pa. 

A program that reaches 
out to victims of abuse, 
SAFE, is an acronym for 
Stop Abuse for Everyone. 

The program involves 
training volunteers to be 
prepared to help victims 
before, during, and after an 
occurrence of violence. 

Formal training ses- 
sions run twice a year in the 
fall and early spring. The 



sessions run about eight 
weeks and there are two 
sessions each week. 

During training the vol- 
unteers will be introduced to 
situations, visuals, videos 
and hands-on experience in 
order to prepare them for 
when they become certified. 

According to the SAFE 
brochure, "Any individual 
(volunteer or staff) who pro- 
vides direct services to vic- 
tims of domestic violence 
and their children, needs to 
have successfully completed 
specialized training con- 
ducted by SAFE staff." 

The SAFE program is 
made up of three compo- 
nents. The first component 
is direct service, which 
refers to the 24-hour hotline 
and counseling services. 

The second component 
is communitv education. 



"BLOG" continued 
from front page 

'They are not allowed to 
talk about drugs, drinking 
or sexual content. We want 
this to be based more on 
their student lives than on 
their personal lives. So. we 
don't edit the blogs aside 
from the comments, but the 
students know what is 
acceptable," Yale said. 

Yale says the project 
was created as a means for 
expansion. "We are always 
trying to increase our stu- 
dent population and 
increase the budget. I 
thought this would be a 
good way to get students 
who might be sitting on the 
fence between Clarion and 
another school to perhaps 
pick Clarion," Yale said. 

"I don't think this is 



going to be a mind-changing 
thing. It's basically a low 
scale project that could 
spark some interest in our 
Web site, and then hopefully 
our university." 

The Spotlight Student 
Bloggers have found the 
experience enjoyable as 
well. Junior secondary 
English education major 
Monica Mellon says, "It's 
been fun to learn about blog- 
ging and have my friends 
and professors tell me they 
have read my blog." Many 
students involved in the 
project believe that it has 
enhanced their social life on 
campus. 

Students are not the 
only ones blogging on the 
Web site. Professor Kenneth 
J. Staub has also been 
active in the program. "I 
hope to provide a professor's 
perspective on university 



Gunmen opens fire 
in Montreal 
College, killing one 



Doug Struck 

Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

At 12:45 p.m., on Wed., 
Sept. 13, in the school cafe- 
teria of Dawson College, 
when a man opened fire, 
kiUing 1 and injuring 19. 

A young man dressed in 
black opened fire with a rifle 
before he was killed by 
police, according to witness- 
es and police. 

Authorities would not 
say Wednesday evening 
whether there were more 
gunmen. 

Witnesses described at 
least one and possibly more 
shooters, but police said 
they could not confirm that. 
Police closed off the col- 
lege, an adjoining shopping 
center, and office tower, and 
remained crouched with 
guns drawn late. 

At least eight of those 
wounded were in critical 
condition, according to an 
official at the Montreal 
General Hospital. 

One student told CNN 
he saw the gunman shoot at 
least three students, includ- 
ing a woman who was hit in 
the arm and leg. 

"He could have been a 
student," the witness said, 
describing a young man 
about 19 or 20 years old who 
was wearing a black trench 
coat and had a "punk" 
appearance. 

Marous said he ran for 
his life when the shooting 
started, with the gunman 



yards behind him. "There 
was chaos, chaos," he said. 

He said the gunman 
came into a second-floor 
cafeteria "out of nowhere" 
and fired several shots. At 
one point, the gunman shot 
people who were lying on 
the floor as police came into 
the cafeteria to corner him, 
said the witness, who did 
not give his name. 

Sober Marous, a stu- 
dent, told Canadian televi- 
sion that the shooter, wear- 
ing army boots, started his 
attack outside the college 
and continued it inside. 
"He said nothing," Marous 
said. "He had a stone-cold 
face. There was nothing on 
his face. He didn't say any- 
thing. He didn't yell out any 
slogans or anything. He just 
started opening fire. He was 
a cold-blooded killer." 

Montreal's police chief, 
Yvan Delorme, said 
Wednesday afternoon that 
one gunman was dead 
■'through police interven- 
tion," and said he could not 
say whether there were 
other attackers. 

Dawson College is a 
post-secondary college 

preparatory school with 
about 10,000 teen-age stu- 
dents. 

The shooting recalled a 
similar event, in 1989, when 
a 25-year-old man left a note 
against feminists and 
opened fire at the Ecole 
Polytechnique de Montreal. 
He killed 14 women before 
killing himself. 



which educates people about 
the types of abuse. McHenry 
often visits schools to speak 
to children about abuse. 
This is also a vital way that 
the public is made aware of 
the availability of assistance 
to victims. 

The final component, 
systems advocacy, main- 
tains contact with medical, 
welfare and human service 
agencies. 

SAFE aides to all indi- 
viduals who are abused or 
battered and in need of 
assistance. 

The organization SAFE 
is governed by volunteers 
that make up a Board of 
Directors. The program is 
also guided through the 
management of other volun- 
teers and professional staff. 

The services of SAFE 
are free and confidenti.il 



and there is no discrimina- 
tion of race, color, creed, age, 
income, religion, sexual ori- 
entation, origin of nationali- 
ty, any disability or ances- 
try 

As previously men- 
tioned, the 24-Hour Hotline 
provides supportive listen- 
ing and crisis intervention if 
necessary. When interven- 
tion is needed, SAFE may 
arrange shelter and trans- 
portation for the victim. 

SAFE is constantly look- 
ing for volunteers and is 
willing to train these indi- 
viduals free of cost. 

Director. Cheryl Miller 
said. "SAFE receives one 
intern a year and several 
work studies students." 

SAFt] was founded in 
1982 by members of the 
League of Women Voters. 



life throughout the academ- 
ic year," Staub says. Though 
Staub is the only professor 
at the university who active- 
ly blogs for the Spotlight 
Student Bloggers, Yale says 
he hopes to expand the pro- 
gram for faculty "Several 
teachers have expressed an 
interest in the blogs so I am 
thinking about expanding 
that element." 

Yale says that anyone 
can start a blog on 
Blogger.com. which is the 
program the university uses 
for the blogs, but he does not 
plan to expand the number 
of students who blog for 
Clarion University by much. 

Yale does not intend to 
extend the program to the 
entire campus because of 
control issues. "I don't want 
this to become a Myspace or 
Facebook of sorts. We want 
to choose active, well achiev- 



"ACES" continued 
from front page 

He also added that the 
students are advised on 
what is appropriate. 

The program is funded by 
the exchange students. 
"International students cur- 
rently pay the highest rate 
of tuition among all Clarion 



ing students who are going 
to represent Clarion 
University well." he said. 

Yale says the process is 
still an experiment. "We def- 
initely are going to do this 
again for the Spring semes- 
ter, but after that I'm not 
sure. I guess we'll just have 
to see how things are going 
with it," he said. 

Spotlight Student 

Bloggers for the Spring 
semester will be chosen 
through faculty recommen- 
dations, as they were this 
semester, and also by recom- 
mendations from the Fall 
semester bloggers. Yale says 
he wants students who are 
actively involved with vari- 
ous activities on campus. He 
also said he hopes the cam- 
pus becomes more involved 
in the interactive aspect of 
the project. 



University students, includ- 
ing out of state students." 
Gant said. 

Clarion University and 
ACES are looking to estab- 
lish an English as a Second 
Language Program, for all 
incoming students that need 
to become proficient in 
English. They are anticiapt- 
ing this program by the 
summer of 2007. 



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September 14, 2006 

Ifim 

A summer of Southern Hospitality 



Page 3 



Ediliiriiil. bWm \\\ ik iidir ;in(! full iin liiu 



The Clarion Call provides a synopsis of all criminal 
investigations as conducted by the Clarion University 
Public Safety for the month of September/August 2006. 
All information can be accessed on the Public Safety 
Web page. 

■ Sept. 3, at 5:55 a.m. a vehicle was stopped for driv- 
ing through a "do not enter" area in lot 12. The driver 
had an odor of alcohol on his breath and failed a PBT 
test. Charges are pending blood results. 

■ Sept. 3, at 1:30 a.m., a vehicle was stopped for run- 
ning through a red hght at 8th avenue and Wood St., 
and for having tinted windows. The driver had a strong 
smell of alcohol on his breath, blood shot eyes, and 
slurred speech. He also failed two of three sobreity 
tests. Charges are pending blood results. 




■ Aug. 30, at 11:30 p.m., vechicle keys were stolen from ( 
the ceramic shop. University police are investigating. I 
Anyone with any information should contact University | 
police. I 

■ Jay Ivanco, 18, of Monroeville, Pa., was issued a cita- ^ 
tion for underage consumption of alchohol when the ; 
vehicle he was in was pulled over in lot 5 on Aug. 30 at 
1?39 a.m. 



■ Jason Krimsky, 18, of Monroeville, Pa, was issued a , 
citation for underage consumption of alchohol when the | 
vehicle he was in was pulled over in lot 5 on Aug 30 at 
12:39 a.m. 

■ Aug. 30, at 9:35 p.m., an iPod was stolen from the 
Recreation Center. University Police are investigating. 

■ Aug. 28, between the hours of 12 a.m. and 2:30 a.m. 
a known intoxicated male enter a resident's room in 
Wilkinson Hall, and grabbed a female resident and 
refused to leave when ordered by residents. Charges 
are pending. 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_seclent®clarion.edu 

While most people spent 
the dog days of summer 
slaving away at the same 
old jobs they do every sum- 
mer, 1 can proudly inform 
everyone that I spent my 
summer basking in the sun 
and learning all about true 
Southern Hospitality. 

The spur of the moment 
decision to move to Myrtle 
Beach, S.C. came about this 
past March. My boyfriend, 
Nick, said that he has 
always wanted to spend a 
summer at the beach. I, on 
the other hand, am a home- 
body mama's girl, but I 
excitedly agreed that mov- 
ing away would be a blast! 

We went down for a visit 
over Easter break (I believe 
that this was my first real 
experience). It was the first 
time that I had ever been to 
Myrtle Beach, let alone my 
first time that far south in a 
long time. 

Nick and I were on our 
way back to our car from the 



beach when I was 
approached by a black lab 
puppy. Being the animal 
lover that I am, 1 began pet- 
ting the puppy while talking 
to her owner At the end of 
the conversation, the man 
shook my hand and said, 
with the biggest smile I've 
over seen, "Nice to meet you! 
Thank you for your time!" 

1 was shocked that this 
man had said this to me. 1 
mean, "Nice to meet you," 1 
get that. "Thank you for 
your time!" are you serious?! 
I have never had a random 
person tell me that other 
than in an interview. C'mon 
now! 

I can say that one thing 
I picked up from this 
Southern Hospitality was 
saying "ma'am," "sir" and, of 
course the most famous 
phrase, "ya'll." It is amazing 
how nice people are when 
treated with courtesy and 
respect. 

I learned my lesson very 
quickly while waiting tables 
that Southerners hate the 
"damn Yankees." I quickly 



adapted to this by develop- 
ing a slight accent that 
would disguise my 

Pittsburghese enough that 
no one would know until I 
slipped up and said some- 
thing like "gum band." 1 was 
very proud of myself, consid- 
ering that I was born and 
raised in Western Pa. My 
new way of talking had 
.some of my guests placing 
bets on where I was from. 

Of course there is 
always the typical redneck, 
and I'm not talking about 
the northern rednecks, oh 
no! These rednecks are from 
a whole other world! 
Southern Hospitality does 
not apply to this particular 
group of people whatsoever 

1 was once told that 
there are about a million 
different types of rednecks 
and I never understood that 
until this summer I had one 
guy who paid for his family 
(him, his wife and two kids). 
Now granted, the restau- 
rant I worked at wasn't 
cheap, but it wasn't fine din- 
ing either The man's check 
was $72 and anyone else 
would've thought this was 
the end of the world! 

Not only did he complain 
to me, my manager and any- 
one else that would listen 
about it. but he only left me 
a $1 tip. Moral of the story: 
Don't order a $10 drink, an 
appetizer and four meals. 

There were also the red- 
necks who believed that 



they were the richest people 
ever They would come in 
ten deep with about two 
hundred dollars in gift 
cards! 

Despite these particular 
instances, my summer was 
the best I've ever had. I real- 
ly think that every person 
should move to the beach for 
a summer It is an amazing 
experience. 1 made .some 
great friends and I learned a 
lot. Oh, by the way, did 1 
mention that 1 made thou- 
.sands of dollars? 

Next summer, don't 
think long and hard about 
leaving the tri-state area, 
just go! At first, I found 
about a million reasons not 
to go, but now, I cannot even 
think of one reason that I 
would not go back. Finding 
a job down there was easier 
than finding a job in my 
hometown. 

I wouldn't take back the 
decision at all. It was fabu- 
lous! So drop the 
Pittsburghese and adapt to 
southern living. Want 
another reason? Think 
about waking up every 
morning and being able to 
go to the beach... EVERY- 
DAY! I can't give ya'll any 
more reasons, just take my 
word for it. 



The author is a sophomore 
communication major and 
Entertainment Editor of 
The Call. 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: ciarioncall.clarion.edu E-mail: call@clarlon.edu 

Executive Board 
2006-2007 



Lindsay Grystar, 
Editor-in-Chief 

Tina Sickier, 
IVIanaging Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desmond, 
Features Editor 

Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 



Amy Kaylor, 
Business IVIanager 

IVIichael Balchin, 
Ad Sales IVIanager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
Graphics Editor 

Josh Doran, 
Online Editor 

Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 



The Entertainment Industry's lazy summer 



Adrienne Cain 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_acain@clarion.edu 



■ Natalie Suska, 20, was arrested in Givan Hall on an 
arrest warrant issued by the State Police of the Butler 
station on drug-related issues. Suska was taken into 
custody by University police and released into custody 
of the State police. 

■ Aug. 27, at 11:10 a.m., an individual reported the 
theft of money from his credit card account. 

■ Zachary Bennett, 19, of New Kensington, Pa., was 
cited after he admitted to drinking alcohol when police 
stopped him on the sidewalk between Marwick-Boyd 
and the Recreational Center 

■ Bryan Nichols, 18, of Lower Burrell, Pa., was stopped 
by University poHce at 1:34 a.m. for driving on the side- 
walk between Marwick-Boyd and the Recreation 
Center Nichols was found to have been drinking and 
was taken into custody for driving under the influence. 
Charges are pending lab results. 

■ Brett Cherok, 18, of Lower Burrell, Pa., admitted to , 
drinking alcohol on Aug. 26 at 2:02 a.m. I 

■ Robert Woods, 18, of New Kensington, Pa., admitted I 
to drinking alcohol on Aug. 26 at 2:20 a.m. 

■ Edward Carlin, 24, ran a stop sign on a bicycle and 
entered the roadway in front of a vehicle on Aug. 19 at 
1:40 a.m. Carlin was under the influence of alcohol and 
was cited for public drunkenness and a stop sign viola- 
tion. 



■ Derek McCance, 20, of Butler, Pa., was stopped for an 
inspection violation on Aug. 22 at 12 a.m. on Wood St. 
and 9th Ave. Through investigation the officer found 
that McCance was wanted in Elizabeth Township for 
access device fraud. McCance was detained on the 
arrest warrant and turned over to the Elizabeth Police 
Department. 



I usually think 
"Entertain me!" as 



■ Sharice Price, 19, of Pittsburgh, Pa., was found smok- 
mg marijuania on the dance floor during a dance in 
Gemmell at 1 a.m. on Aug. 23. Price was escorted out 
and also found to be in posession of marijuania. 

■ Ilkka Jussila, 24, was found passed out on a bench in 
the Nair courtyard at 1:35 a.m. on Aug. 24. Jussila was 
found to be intoxicated and was cited for public drunk- 
eness. 

■ Shane Fabian, 24, of Aliquippa, Pa., was charged 
with possession of marijuana, drug paraphernaha pub- 
lic drunkeness, disorderly conduct, harassment' and 
obstructing administration of law on Aug. 27 at 2:07 
a.m. Fabian interferred with police investigation and 
pushed an officer. Charges are pending Erie lab results 



of 
the 

expected cry of a spoiled 
child or willful princess, or 
the cry of girls who wear 
"Spoiled" and "Brat" shirts 
and somehow don't realize 
that those are bad things to 
be. Nonetheless, I don't 
think asking the entertain- 
ment industry, specifically 
the movie industry, to 
"entertain me" should be a 
lot to ask, even during the 
summer when the season is 
slow. Between work, con- 
certs, friends and various 
other obligations, I man- 
aged to see eight films in the 
theater from May through 
August. I usually expect 
that for every eight films 1 
see, two will be good or 
great, three will be okay, 
and the last three will be 
bad. 

As I look at my ticket 
stubs from the summer, 
chronologically arranged 
before me, I really have to 
wonder: What happened to 
the really good movies? Or 
even worse: When did 
movies stop trying? 

The first movie of the 
summer I saw was "Stick 
Tt." I didn't want to see the 
film in the first place but 1 
was overruled three to one 
and "Stick It" was the win- 
ner Going into the film with 
only poor expectations. 1 
was at least pleasantly sur- 
prised. It wasn't ground- 
breaking or particularly 
clever, but it was at least 
mildly entertaining. 

Continuing my trend of 
being forced into movies. I 
saw 'The BreakUp" next. 
Personally, I was eyeing up 
"X-Men: The Last Stand" 
because at least when comic 
book films lack good dia- 
logue or stor>- they usually 
still have great effects to 
praise. 'The BreakUp," you 



might imagine, is about a 
break-up. Watching two peo- 
ple break up on screen is 
about as emotionally inter- 
esting as watching two 
strangers break up on the 
street and at least in real 
life, people aren't burdened 
by scripted humor You may 
even enjoy a real life break 
up, especially if it is in the 
right aisle of the store. 

The next film to let me 
down was "Nacho Libre" 
which failed at being the 
winsome underdog that 
"Napoleon Dynamite" was, 
while simultaneously man- 
aging to damage any serious 
credibility Jack Black may 
have gained from "King 
Kong." I may have liked it if 
I were a thirteen-yearold 
boy with a love of excrement 
and flatulence related jokes 
but as it was, I missed the 
boat on the humor factor 1 
had only myself to blame for 
that choice. 

What can I say about 
"Scary Movie 4?" Not quite 
as good as "Scary Movie 3," 
but better than the original 
"Scary Movie." The "Scary 
Movie" series is at least 
straightforward in what 
they plan to do, which is 
simply mock the most popu- 
lar horror films since the 
last installment. With the 
way the horror industry is 
going, it's not a particularly 
hard task to handle. I saw 
this at the two dollar the- 
ater in Boardman, Oh. and 
got my money's worth. 

Then came the indus- 
try's crowning jewel of the 
summer "Pirates of the 
Caribbean: Dead Man's 
Chest." This time around. 
Pirates fell prey to both 'the 
curse of the sequel' and 'the 
curse of two movies that 
could have been one.' You 
may not have heard of the 
latter curse but think of it 
as the Klinefelter's 
Syndrome (Google it) of the 
movie industry. It's not 
always obvious, we may not 
all talk about it, but it exists 



just the same. Following the 
success of "Pirates of the 
Caribbean: Curse of the 
Black Pearl," the industry 
spawned out another 
installment that was 
stretched out enough to 
make into two separate 
films. This isn't to say that 
the plot or even the acting 
was bad, but apparently 
when you stretch out a plot 
that much, the only thing to 
fill in the extra time is slap- 
stick and special effects. I'll 
pay to see the third install- 
ment, but only because 1 
need closure. 

I'm sure that by this 
point, you are weary, tired 
and wondering if I saw any- 
thing really worthwhile. M. 
Night Shyamalan's latest 
film, "Lady in the Water" 
was the next film I saw. Did 
that answer your question? 



'Clerks" and hoped that the 
sequel would hold up to it. 
It's more vulgar and more 
sentimental this time 
around but maintains the 
flavor of the original. I spent 
the film being amused, not 
just by the plot and the act- 
ing, but by the sheer show of 
the Kevin Smith touch. 
When the cast launches into 
a choreographed dance 
number I don't pause for a 
second. Like seeing a good 
friend get ahead, it warms 
my heart-place to look up 
and see a pricy number 
being done on screen just 
because it can be done. 

I saw "Pulse" because of 
a sick disease I have that 
requires me to see every 
originally Japanese film 
that America muddles its 
way through. It was pretty 
easy to know what was 



Striking a strange balance going to happen. Ringu is 
between whimsy and horror better than "The Ring, Ju- 



is a hard task that 
Shyamalan doesn't quite 
manage to pull off. Perhaps 
it is the fact that since he is 
known for his plot twists, I 
spend most of the film look- 
ing for that critical moment. 
Maybe I was distracted by 
the fact that Shyamalan 
cast himself as the savior of 
the world. Or maybe it was 
the fact that Shyamalan 
bemoans the evils of movie 
criticism within a movie in 
the most obvious (exposition 
all the way) manner 
Despite all of its shortcom- 
ings, though, I liked "Lady 
in the Water" The fairytale 
surrealism, the colorful 
characters, the strange pac- 
ing - I liked it all. I'd never 
call it a really great film but 
I hked it the way I'd like a 
puppy with a limp, wounded 
but compelling. 

The other big box office 
opener of that weekend was 
"Clerks II," which I was 
excited to see. Not every- 
thing Kevin Smith does is 
solid and fun. but I've had a 
very good success rate with 
his films. I loved the original 



on" is better than The 
Grudge, the Japanese "Dark 
Water" is better than the 
American one, and "Kairo" 
was better than the 
American remake "Pulse." 
Pulse relies almost entirely 
on unclean college apart- 
ments and flickering light- 
ing for suspense and creepi- 
ness. Please don't mind our 
heroine Kristen Bell, she's 
using all of her acting skills 
trying to cry, but will be 
back soon with her bland 
confused performance. Out 
in the Ugh ted world. Pulse 
fails to attach any creepy 
stigma to my life the way a 
good horror film should. I 
came out not wondering if 
such a thing could happen to 
me, but rather how it could 
happen to anyone. 

I'm sure that here you 
are just waiting to contra- 
dict me. You'll say that eight 
movies are not enough to 
really show how good or bad 
movies have been lately. I 
would most likely agree 
with you there, but remem- 
ber, these are the 'big hits' of 
the summer. These are the 



Dr. Susan Hilton 
Adviser 



Staff 

New«; Natalie Kennell, Kelly Pennisi, Adam Mohney, 
Shakira O'Neil, Krystal Finkbeiner Features: Danielle 
Butcherine, Deldra Horrell Entertainment: Dominic 
Giallombardo, Emily Aaron, Robyn Gray, Grace Regaiagado 
SPPrtt; Chris Parks, Robert Rankin Copy Editing MIchele 
Straub, Nicole Bovaird Advertising : Lauren Couch, Courtney 
Krol, Jenna Peno, Mike Smith Business: Sarah Slelski, 
Stephanie Corse, Shawn Turner Photography and Graphics: 
Bethany Ross, Mike Cauvel, Misha Snyder, Jenifer Poblete, 
Phil Drelick, Thomas Fair, Ben Elliot aroulatton: Eric Levy, 
Allison Kerr, Nicole Lawrence, John Blumer, Ryan Bridge, 
Bryan Bingham 

Policies 

The Clarion Call Is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and obscen- 
ity; the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy is free: additional copies are $1.00. 

■ Opinions expressed in tliis 
publication are those of ttie writer or 
speal<er, and do not necessarily reflect 
the opinions of the newspaper staff, stu- 
dent body, Clarion University or the com- 
munity. 



big-name-theater- near-you 
films that are supposed to 
represent the best that 
funding can bring. Instead 
of originality, in most of 
these you find the same for- 
mulaic writing and reliance 
on stereotypes that fills 
mass market fiction and 
romance novels. Outside of 
small theaters, it is hard to 
find a truly original or 
clever film anymore. Sure 
the films can be entertain- 
ing but when every trip to 
the movies costs between 
$7-9, you have to really won- 
der if you are getting your 
money's worth from the 
deal. The movie industry 
direly needs some fresh 
ideas. They are starting to 
run out of political events, 
comic books, sports .stories. 
Japanese horror remakes, 
and sequels to lifelessly 
e.xploit. Is it really too much 
to ask the entertainment 
industry to really entertain 
us? 




,. Calling all 
students! 

Write an opinion 
piece for the 




or for 



Let the student body know how 

you feel about a subject that Is 

important to you or raise 

awareness about an 

occurrence that is overlooked 

on campus on in the nation. 

Submissions are '^ 
always accepted! '§ 



Page 4 



TOS CLARION CALL 



^g|myy;^14^200| 



Feitms 

Soldiers share Iraq experiences with students 



Danielle Butcherine 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

8_dnbutchert@clarion.edu 

On September 11 at 8 
p.m. in the Geramell Multi- 
purpose Room, the 
University Activities Board 
sponsored a program enti- 
tled "Iraq: A Soldier's 
Perspective" to commemo- 
rate the fifth anniversary of 
9/11. 

Three Army veterans, 
Sgt. First Class Walter 
Jordan, Staff Sgt. Michael 
Hartzell of the U.S. Army 
Recruiting Station in 
Clarion and current Clarion 
University student Sgt. 
Adam Whitaker, spoke to 
the audience about their 
experiences while serving in 
the military in the Middle 
East. 

Hartzell and Whitaker 
began the evening by pre- 
senting a short slide show of 
photographs they had taken 
while on duty in Iraq. 

"I think showing us the 
pictures was a great idea 
because it did two things," 
said Jesse Young, a sopho- 
more English education 
major. "I think they showed 
us our soldiers in Iraq are 
actually doing something, 
contrary to what a lot of peo- 



ple think, and I think they 
showed us that Iraq, in 
terms of landscape, is more 
than just a huge desert." 

Although none of the 
pictures were filled with vio- 
lence or similar to images 
shown on television. 
Hartzell said to the audi- 
ence, "We're trying to paint 
a picture of Iraq to make it 
sound like a vacation." 

During and after the 
slide show, the veterans 
gave a short overview of 
what their duties were 
while serving overseas. 

Whitaker, a senior 
accounting major, served in 
Iraq from January 2004 
through February 2006. 
"Half of the time, we ran a 
detainment facility, where 
we detained prisoners of 
war and people who broke 
curfews and other laws. The 
other half of the time we did 
security operations and con- 
voy security. Convoy securi- 
ty is where we drive with 
convoys from point A to 
point B and protect them," 
he said. 

Whitaker said he was 
unsure of what to expect 
when he arrived in Iraq. "I 
trained for five weeks in the 
freezing cold in New Jersey, 
which is ironic because of 
how hot it is in Iraq. We 



were basically trained and 
then deployed. It was kind 
of like the scene in Jarhead 
where they walk off the 
plane in the desert and see 
nothing but thousands of 
troops." 

Hartzell, who served in 
Iraq during the initial inva- 
sion, said, "I was a typical 
ground guy. We defended 
ourselves... it was urban 
warfare. After that, I went 
back to my original job, 
which involves computer 
work." 

After the gentlemen 
were finished with their pre- 
sentations, they gave the 
students and community 
members the opportunity to 
ask questions. 

One of the first ques- 
tions an audience member 
asked the soldiers was what 
the best and worst things 
were about being deployed 
to a war zone. 

"The best was seeing 
how grateful the people 
are," said Hartzell. "The 
worst thing was the loss of 
life." 

Jordan, who served in 
the military during the 
Desert Storm conflict, 
agreed with Hartzell and 
added, "For us, knowing we 
liberated Kuwait was the 
best thing." 




MMa Snmter/TM ^MSM CM 
U.S. Soldiers - (From left to right) Staff Sgt. Michael Hartzell, Sgt. First Class Walter Jonian 
and Clarion University senior Sgt. Adam Whitaker spoke to student in the Gemmell MPR on 
September 11 atx}ut their experiences in Iraq. 



Another topic that came 
up during the question and 
answer session was if the 
Iraqi people want U.S. 
troops in their country or if 
they would rather the troops 
leave. 

"The whole Southern 
part of Iraq appreciates us 
being there," said Whitaker. 
"The people in Southern 
Iraq were really oppressed 
by Saddam Hussein. There 
is poverty throughout lower 
Iraq. However, I do think 



that they have some 
reserves about whether or 
not we're trying to colonize 
them or force our ideals on 
them." 

Kayla Shaw, a freshman 
biology major, said, "It 
seems like the popular behef 
among U.S. citizens today is 
that the Iraqi people don't 
want us over there. Hearing 
people who have actually 
spent time in Iraq say that 
the Iraqi people really do 
appreciate what our troops 



are doing for them is mind* 
changing and a lot more 
believable than hearing 
those words from some sen- 
ator or other government 
official." 

"I really enjoyed hearing 
what these veterans had to 
say," said Young. "I really 
appreciate the fact that they 
were willing to go in front of 
an audience and talk about 
their experiences in the 
Middle East." 



Admissions Web site named one of best in country 



Deldra Horrell 

Clarior) Call Staff Writer 

s_dlhorrell®clarion.edu 

Applying for colleges 
and deciding on a major can 
be a tedious and trying 
moment in an individual's 
life. However, thanks to 
Clarion University's 

Admissions' Office Web site, 
this process can be a little 
less overwhelming. 

Over the past academic 
year, 3,000 universities 
nationwide allowed 1,000 
high school seniors to exam- 
ine their Web sites and rate 
them. Each university's site 
was scored using a grade - 
like system. An "A" repre- 
sented an excellent site 
while an "F" marked an 
unsatisfactory site. Only 
130 of the 3,000 universities 
received an A-rating and 
Clarion University's 

Admissions Office Web site 
placed among them. 

This summer. Clarion's 
site was also recognized as 
one of the "best in the 
nation" for its layout design 
and VIP admissions pages. 
Two other finalists, Cal Poly 
San Luis Obispo and Kent 
State University, were also 
given this distinction. 

One of the major factors on 
Clarion's Web site that was 
highly praised is the VIP 
section. Any prospective stu- 



dent can simply fill out a 
form of general information, 
including his/her major of 
interest, and then receive a 
personalized VIP page that 
matches his criteria. 

"The VIP page uses the 
same welcome header each 
time the student logs on," 
said Jake Yale, Assistant 
Director of Admissions. 
From there, the student is 
presented with information 
on "visits, the town of 
Clarion, academic interests, 
one to two majors, activities, 
the honors program, sports, 
the recreation center and 
the library." 

Also unique to the site is 
the "virtual advisor," better 
known as "Ask the Eagle." A 
student can simply type any 
question into the search 
engine and receive results 
that best matches the crite- 
ria. 

Since money plays a 
critical role throughout col- 
lege, information on finan- 
cial aid is made directly 
available to students and 
their families. Explanations 
on how to apply for scholar- 
ships as well as when the 
FASFA should be filed can 
also be found. 

Freshman Kristi 

McManus frequently visited 
Clarion's Admissions site 
while she was applying to 
the university. Obtaining 
information about the 



school as well as examining 
dorm halls were two of 
McManus's reasons for 
using the site. 

"You don't have to 
search all over the site for 
what you're looking for," 
McManus said. "[The site] 
narrows things down so 
there's not so much informa- 
tion." 

McManus also likes the 
fact that Clarion's site offers 
ideas for a minor as well as 
additions to suit one's per- 
sonality. 

However, Clarion's site 
does not stop there. Online 
tours are also available to 
students so they can visual- 
ly see what the campus 
looks Uke and the town in 
which it resides. 

"The tour made me more 
confident in coming to 
Clarion," said McManus. 

Statistics prove that 
Clarion's site is successful 
among the student body. 
Many prospective students 
take advantage of a pop-up 
that allows them to request 
more information on Clarion 
University. 

According to Yale, about 
six to eight students fill out 
the form each day and a 
total of 3,000 students have 
since June 2005. 

Student blogs, a new fea- 
ture that was recently 
added to the site, have also 
proven to be popular among 



students. In two weeks 
alone, the student blog sec- 
tion accumulated 3,500 hits. 
Clarion's site also sends 
out personalized e-mails to 
prospective students about 
events pertaining to their 
major, upcoming campus- 
visit opportunities, open 
houses or birthdays. Just 
last week, an e-mail was 
distributed to high school 
seniors wishing them luck 
this upcoming school year. 
Hundreds of e-mails are 
sent out daily, said Yale. 

"We've spent the last 
four to five years refining 
the site," said William 
Bailey, Dean of Enrollment 
Management. "We want the 
site to be easy to use and 
what fstudents] want to 
see." 

Clarion's Web site and the 
numerous features it has to 
offer are meant to attract 
students, but Bailey still 
envisions the site growing. 

"We're always looking to 
improve," said Bailey. 

A possible addition to 
the site may include a sec- 
tion geai-ed toward parents 
of prospective students. 
Since the college admissions 
process is increasingly more 
family oriented and some- 
times even persuaded by 
family members, Bailey 
feels that an informational 
page for parents could be an I 
added bonus. 



Computer repairs cost 
consumers $7.8 billion 




Kim Hart 

The Washington Post 

Consumers paid as 
much $7.8 billion over two 
years to repair or replace 
computers that got infected 
with viruses and spj^are, a 
Consumer Reports survey 
found. 

That figure was down 
from a similar survey a year 
ago. Still, it suggests that 
people are paying large 
sums to cope with the flood 
of malicious viruses and 
other programs that can 
slow computers or render 
them inoperable. 

'There is a very high 
national cost to this," said 
Jeff Fox, technology editor 
of the consumer magazine. 
"People think they're invin- 
cible, even when this kind of 
money is involved." 

In a nationwide survey, 
the magazine found that 
unwanted commercial e- 
mail, known as spam, is the 
biggest computer-security 
problem. But viruses are the 
most expensive, with people 
paying $5.2 billion in 2004 
and 2005 to repair or 
replace afflicted machines, 
the survey found. 

Infections of spyware, a 
type of software that can 
track computer users' habits 
or collect sensitive informa- 
tion about them, declined 
slightly in the past six 
months, the survey found. 
However such infections 
still caused almost 1 million 
U.S. households to replace 
their computers, the survey 
found. 

Losses from phishing 
scams, which are fake e- 
mails and Web pages that 
request sensitive data such 
as bank-account passwonls, 
increased five-fold from the 
previous survey, with people 
telling the magazine that 
such scams cost them $630 
million in 2004 and 2CK)5. 
That's an average loss of 
$850 per incident. 

"Phishing scams are 
worse than they've ever 



been," Fox said. 'The bad 
guys are getting very 
sophisticated." 

'The numbers could pos- 
sibly be inflated by the way 
the questions are phrased, 
especially in an area in 
which most people aren't 
very articulate," said Robert 
Lichter, who runs a statisti- 
cal center at George Mason 
University in Fairfax, Va. 
'The people surveyed may 
have a very vague sense of 
what these things are.'" 

Other organizations 
that monitor Internet fraud 
complaints also point to 
growth in cybercrime. 
Internet-related complaints 
made up nearly half of all 
fraud complaints received 
by the Federal Trade 
Commission in 2005, with 
people claiming losses of 
$335 million. And financial 
losses reported to the 
Internet Crime Complaint 
Center, a joint effort of the 
FBI and the National White 
Collar Crime Center, tripled 
in 2005, to $183 million, 
compared with the previous 
year. 

Financial losses report- 
ed to the Internet Crime 
Complaint Center tripled in 
2005, to $183 milUon, com- 
pared with the previous 
year. 

While attacks used to be 
mostly nuisances, they have 
become more threatening, 
said Dave Cole, director of 
security response at 
Symantec Corp., a leading 
computer security company. 
Many of today's spam and 
phishing attacks target con- 
sumers' personal informa- 
tion with the intention of 
steaUng money or in some 
cases, identities. 

The Consumer Reports 
survey of 2,000 households 
found that 20 percent of 
respondents didn't have 
antivirus software and that 
35 percent didn't use spy- 
ware-blocking software. As 
the Internet gains more 
users, it's important to edu- 
cate them on the security 
risks. Cole said. 



SSBlUQbUJiiJS^ 



Tlffi OUIMCMI CALL 



Fantasy sports ^ve fans the inside experience 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

«_M(taVTiondttcl«rion.«du 

Not everyone is fortu- 
nate enough to have the 
means to own a professional 
sports team. But sports fans 
now have a chance to get 
closer to ownership then 
ever before: fantasy drafts. 

Many offices, friends 
and families hold their own 
contests once football or bas- 
ketball season rolls around. 
They pick the winners for 
each game during the sea- 
son and assign points for 
each correct choice. 

With the rise of fantasy 
sports drafts online, it is 
now even easier for fans to 
pky the game. This contest, 
however, allows partici- 
pants to compete against 
others ftom all around the 
world. 

Online fantasy drafts 
also allow fans to have an 
ownership experience. They 
choose players from differ- 
ent teams, and earn points 
based on their performance 
at their respective games. 

There are many sports 
to choose from when decid- 
ing to play fantasy sports. 
Football, hockey, basketball 
and baseball all have many 
leagues one can join online. 
There are also other sports 
available, such as golf and 
auto racing, as well as 
drafts for college sports 
teams. 

Most players join a 
game based on their sports 
preferences. For instance, a 
devote Steelers fan would 
most likely enroll in a foot- 
ball draft. Some sites, how- 
ever, allow fans to pick play- 
ers from several different 
sports for the ultimate fan- 
tasy team. 

Once one decides which 
sport to start a fantasy 
game with, they must 
choose how they would like 



to play: for fun or money. 
There are many options for 
each preference. 

Free games allow users 
to play for fun. The rules 
stay the same except that 
there are no cash prizes 
awarded to winning teams. 
The disadvantage to free 
play is that there are limit- 
ed resources available to aid 
drafters in their games. 

When playing fantasy 
sports for money, one must 
pay to play. A team must pay 
anywhere from $15-$40 to 
play for the season. The 
range of prices depends on 
the game you chose to play 
and which options are 
offered to assist gameplay. 
Next, players must decide 
which game they would like 
to play. When registering, 
one has the option to choose 
between creating their own 
league or joining an existing 
or public league. 

Creating a custom league 
allows users to control their 
own league. 

"Commissioners" are 
then able to invite "man- 
agers" to join. Managers are 
members who enter a league 
with their own teams. 

Commissioners cus- 
tomize the league through 
many different options, 
including the maximum 
teams allowed, deadlines, 
player options and scoring 
options. 

Joining an existing or 
custom league does not give 
fans as much freedom. 
Custom leagues are con- 
trolled by the commissioner 
of that league. These are 
inviteonly. One would join 
with friends or co-workers, 
for example. 

In a public league, one 
chooses preferences and is 
placed in a league with oth- 
ers who choose similarly. 

Once a manager joins a 
league, a draft takes place. 
There are also numerous 
options for drafting. 



The first is a live online 
draft. Commissioners 

choose a draft time and 
date, depending on avail- 
able times for managers. On 
the specified date, managers 
go to the team's page and 
enter to participate in the 
draft. 

Each team selects one 
player per round until all of 
the players are chosen. If a 
manager is not able to be 
present for the draft, he or 
she can pre-rank players 
based on his or her prefer- 
ence. The computer will 
assign players to the man- 
ager's team based on these 
rankings. 

Similarly, managers 
have the choice to sign- up 
for an auto-pick draft. Based 
on prerankings or the site's 
rankings, players are 
assigned to a team. 

Offline drafting is also 
an option for custom 
leagues. If a league is made 
for co-workers, for example, 
commissioners have the 
opportunity to set a time 
and date to draft at the 
office. After drafting, the 
commissioner simply sub 
mits the results to the home 
site. 

Many sites offer tools to 
help choose players. These 
are included in paid games, 
and offered at an additional 
price for free games. The 
types of tools include news 
reports, statistics informa- 
tion and player updates. 

Once a draft is complet- 
ed and the sport's season 
starts, scoring begins. In 
fantasy play, leagues assign 
points for different aspects 
of a player's game and 
points are awarded based on 
performance. 

For example, in a fanta- 
sy football game, the league 
may allocate touchdowns 
five points, fumbles three 
points and tackles one point. 

Teams can also partici- 
pate in things Uke trading, 



Studies sliow chemicals developed 
to destroy odors may destroy lungs 



Melissa Mealy 
Los Angeles Times 

It may not be a house- 
hold name, but 1,4- 
dichlorobfrnzeno is a com- 
mon household smell. It is 
the whiff of mothballs, the 
aroma masking a damp 
basement, the essence of an 
under ventilated bathroom. 
It cc mes from a soUd brick of 
in&ecfchasing, odorcover- 
ing, toilet-bowl cleaning 
power called 

paradichlorobenzene - or 
"para" in the cleaning trade. 

A new study says the 
chemical could be damaging 
the lungs of people who 
inhale it regularly. 

When exposed to air, 
paradichlorobenzene (what 
mothballs are made of) gives 
off a volatile organic com- 
pound - a chemical emitted 
in gas form - called 1,4- 
dichlorobenzene (or, in 
chemical shorthand, 1,4- 
DCB). It is not one of those 
airborne (impounds - ben- 
zene, styrene and toluene - 
whose names have long 
prompted shudders of con- 
cern among experts in air 
quality. In fact, in the latest 
study of volatile organic 
compounds and lung func- 
tion, published in the 
August issue of 

Environmental Health 
Perspectives, those com- 
pounds came off looking 
pretty innocent by compari- 
son. 

Of 11 such compounds 
found in detectable concen- 
trations in the blood of the 
latest stu<fy's participants, 
only one - 1,4-DCB - was 
associated with poorer lung 



function. 

Dr. John Balmes, a pul- 
monary critical care physi- 
cian and professor of medi- 
cine at the University of 
California, Berkeley and UC 
San Francisco, said he was 
surprised by the study But 
Balmes, also a spokesman 
for the American Lung 
Association's California 
chapter, added that the new 
finding was in line with sev- 
eral studies that have 
warned of the respiratory 
dangers of many household 
cleaners. 

He says that when his 
patients ask about air fresh- 
eners in general, "I'd say if 
you can avoid it, not to use 
them. I don't see the need to 
introduce other chemicals 
into our environment when 
there're already so many 
bad actors." 

A study released in May 
by the California Air 
Resources Board, a division 
of the state's Environmental 
Protection Agency, warned 
that several compounds 
found in air fresheners and 
household cleansers can 
reach harmful concentra- 
'.ions inside homes. But the 
blocks of "para" found in 
slow-dissolving air freshen- 
ers and toilet-bowl deodoriz- 
ers, pose a particular prob- 
lem because they release 
compounds into the air over 
a long period. The result is 
that exposure to these 
fumes is, by design, chronic. 

In the latest study, 
researchers from the 
National Institute of 
Environmental Health 
Sciences drew from meas- 
urements taken in an exten- 
sive national health survey 



conducted between 1988 
and 1994. In all, 1,018 
Americans were tested both 
for exposure and lung func- 
tion, and 846 showed blood 
levels of 1,4-DCB suggestive 
of some chronic exposure. 

In two key measures of 
respiratory function, those 
with exposure to the "para" 
fumes tested more poorly, 
and their respiratory func- 
tion declined as exposures 
among participants 

increased. Even among 
study participants who 
never smoked, the relation- 
ship between exposure to 
1,4 DCB and lung impair- 
ment was significant. While 
such reductions in lung 
function can be temporary 
when they are the result of a 
short exposure to harmful 
substances, the authors 
noted that "they generally 
precede permanent effects." 
And when a person sustains 
permanent lung damage, he 
or she is at higher risk for 
heart disease, stroke and 
cancer. 

Anthony Tran, presi- 
dent of a small Los Angeles - 
based cleaning company, 
said he had grown more con- 
cerned, both for his clients' 
health and that of his 12 
employees. As a result, he 
said, his family's company, 
Sunset Cleaners, expects to 
discontinue a wide range of 
harsh cleaning agents and 
replace them with gentler 
cleaning solutions that, in 
many cases, have been used 
for hundreds of years. 

Tm definitely making a 
point of paying attention to 
the productr. I use now," 
Tran said. "It's a new type of 
thinking." 




ASK^oeronm^ii'z 



)enching and acquiring free 
agents, )\.m like in the pro- 
fessional league,'^. 

After joining a league, 
there is the option of playing 
a headtdhead or point,^ 
game. 

Headto head games 
allow managers to plav 
against carh (sther. gaining 
points each week to deter- 
mine a winner. Points 
games allow everyone to 
compete, in attempts to earn 
the nnwt points each week. 

Once playoffs begin. 
team.s compete againnt each 
other until one is victorious 
Depending on how many 
teams are in the league and 
the host sfte's policies, 
teams are ni ranged in a 
bracket-like system to 
determine the winner. 

Various Web sites alwo 
offer additional game.s tor 
users to play. 

Head2Head.com supplies 
games like Touchdown Pick 
'Em, in which users choose 
one team from eight cate- 
gories who they believe will 
get the most touchdowns 
that week. 

There are many sites one 
can choose to play fantasy 
sports. Many come from big- 
name companies like 
yahoo.com and espn.com. 
Other lesser known compa- 
nies, like Head2Head.com. 
can offer the §ame experi- 
ence as more well-known 
names. 

As with any Web site, 
always check the authentic- 
ity and reliability before dis- 
closing any personal infor- 
mation. 



1) 

1 am a ireHtuimn iins year uiiti 
^vn vi-rv r?iii-t> tn niv fiiiTiilv ho it v\ 
f t 
til 

my ih 
Sis^ri' ' 



ness at one time or anoth 
that students are not aldiiu. 



iibt'i 



h< , 

iwm- 

Talk 
Cham 
same 



-Tie tips t*' 
with hu 




ibout it. 
!) i^ the 
, iidiTis' time 
with friends can i 
bt ' ime 

jnvui\eu Willi acuvities such 
as the Univer-tt«. Activities 
Board (UA! Hall 

Council. Thi ijreat 

opportunities ly iiiuet new 
people and find out what is 
going on around cainpii« 

Bringing familia 
from home can al^o help one 
cope. Photo.-i. plants or a 
stuffed animal can make a room feel more like home 
The homier a room feel.s. the more comfortable one will 
feel. 

Plan a weekend to go home. Look at your schedule 
and find a weekend that would work best. You may feel 
like you want to go home every weekend now, but that 
will not help your homesickness. Also, there are activi 
ties planned each weekend for families to participate in 
if they come to campus. 

If one is homesn k and cannot iu\)e, the Counseling 
Center on campu.s can help. They deal with this ft-e- 
quently in large numbers and offer assistance to stu- 
dents. 



Dr. Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson of the Keeling 
Health Center. For more information or to suggest a 
topic, e-mail her at s_smwHBonAlarion.edu. 



J 




A 



Page 6 



Tffi QJkRlOy CALL 



September 14. 2006 



EitertiiBMeit 

The new Facebook starts uproar 



Dominic Giallombardo 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_djgiallomb@ clarlon.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 14 - "We 
really messed this one up," 
was stated in the simple 
apology given by founder 
Mark Zuckerberg to users of 
"Facebook." 

Mark Zuckerberg. along 
with financial help from 
Eduardo Saverin, launched 
"thefacebook" at Harvard 
University in February of 
2004. Within months of its 
launch the site became so 
popular that membership 
exceeded one million. 

Both Zuckerberg and 
Saverin left Harvard to run 
"thefacebook" full time. 

In August 2004, "the" 
was dropped from the 
domain name and "face- 
book. com" was born. In 
September of 2005, 
Facebook created a high 
school version and five 
months later the two net- 
works were joined. 

I think that Zuckerberg 
did a great thing in connect- 
ing so many people with 
friends they may have oth- 



erwise lost forever. This 
obviously backfired slightly 
at the beginning of this 
school year. 

On Sept 5, 2006, two 
new features were intro- 
duced: "News Feed" and 
"Mini-feed." The News Feed 
is shown on every member's 
homepage and displays 
recent activities of their 
friends. The Mini-feed is on 
each members profile page 
and shows a similar list of 
activities. 

Although I did not like 
much of the new features at 
first. 1 think that they were 
meant in all possible ways 
to be a good thing. 

Hours after the launch 
of the new features, three 
groups emerged from the 
facebook masses. One side 
opposed the new features 
pointing to the lessening of 
personal safety and privacy, 
while other sides supported 
them in various ways. 

The largest group 
"Students Against Facebook 
News Feed (Official Petition 
to Facebook)" totaled almost 
three quarters of a mil 



[ffl You were NOT invited to 

ionbiddle's Birthday Bash l:07pm 



tf^ Brian Picard is looking through 
yourwindovf. I2!57pm 

Turn around, ^ I 



lion members. One student, 
sophomore elementary edu- 
cation major Kendall Moore 
said, "It's too 'stalkerazzi.' I 
feel like nothing can be pri- 
vate anymore. Everyone can 
find out what you're doing 
or what you've done and at 
what exact time and date. It 
just feels like a major inva- 
sion of privacy." 

Likewise, groups were 
also formed in favor of the 
"new facebook" stating that 
it is convenient and dismiss- 
ing the privacy concerns. 
The members of these 
groups pointed out that one 
could hide many of the feeds 



Students get "Mediated" at show 



Emily Aaron 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ennaaron@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 14 - 
Aurora Landin, Jacky 
Sawartzky, Dan Reetz and 
Brant Schuler are exhibit- 
ing their mediated art work 
from September 5 to 
October 5 in the University 
Gallery on Level A in the 
Carlson Library. 

These artists use many 
different forms of art to 
interpret different actions in 
the media. Television, video 
cameras, metal and a laptop 
were all used to show off the 
artists' work. They used 
contemporary forms of com- 
munication to create their 
present context of each of 
their pieces. 

Landin uses printmak- 
ing to create her piece 
known as "Patience," which 
is made from an enamel 
silkscreen on a large scale 
piece of aluminum. In this 
piece, she took one specific 
print to tile together to 
make her work look as 
though it is endless. 

Landin states in her 
artist statement that, "The 
repetitive abilities of the 
techniques of printmaking 
are used to portray cycles of 
experience, cycles of ritual, 
cycle of nature and human 



behavior." From the view- 
ers' eyes they will look at 
the piece and see no end. It 
is as though the piece goes 
on forever. 

Sawartzky shows off 
"Mediated perception/Body 
memory and the Shadow" 
through her computer that 
she placed in the basket of a 
bicycle for all to watch as 
she travels through to these 
different places. 

She wanted to show her 
experience to the viewer by 
riding a bike through three 
different cities^ Beijing, 
China, Winnipeg, Canada 
and Gronningen, 

Netherlands. The computer 
shows the different atmos- 
phere that the artist trav- 
eled through to create her 
work. It helps the viewer to 
see clearly through the 
artist's mind of what she 
wanted her audience to see. 

In Reetz's work, "No 
Pictures, Please," he was 
trying to create an unedited 
diary of himself by recording 
something every two and a 
half minutes of his life. He 
did this by strapping the 
camera to his body and 
going about his daily busi- 
ness. 

Reetz did this to show 
what it is like to be under 
constant surveillance 

because he believes our 
world is constantly being 



watched. He wanted to 
show what it would be like 
for someone who deals with 
that on a daily basis. 

Schuler creates his 
piece, "24 hr. CNN," by trac- 
ing the television screen for 
24 hours to show the differ- 
ent points and information 
that is given in a days worth 
of CNN. 

He states that, '"My 
'Tracings' don't just observe 
time, they try to capture the 
transitory nature by linear 
mapping of my sensory 
responses to color, lights, 
shapes and patterns being 
emitted from the screen." 

He set up a TV set in 
front of all his drawings so 
that the viewer could watch 
as the show moved on and 
see the changing of his pic- 
tures every step of the way. 

These pieces were all 
very different, but yet so 
alike. It is very intriguing 
to see the different ways an 
artist comes up with a piece. 

The work of these 
artists will be displayed in 
the Gallery until October 5. 
The hours are Monday, 
Tuesday, Wednesday and 
Friday from 10 a.m. ■ 4 p.m., 
Thursday from 10 a.m. ■ 7 
p.m., and Saturday from 1-4 
p.m. all of which are open to 
the public. 




Phil Drellck/The Clarion Call 

'Mediated' - Artists from i^oth Clarion and all over display their artwork in Clarion University's art 
gallery in Carlson Librpr,: The exhibit will be open until October 5. 



by manually deleting them. 
The largest group that I can 
find, "Prove Me Wrong," 
only has 173 members, but 
there are numerous other 
groups in favor of these new 
features. 

The third group was too 
indecisive to know what 
they wanted so they just 
decided to say as sophomore 
communication major Dave 
Keremes said, "Eh, it does- 
n't matter." Some of this 
group go as far as saying it 
is weird, but then take no 
action. 

Freshman music educa- 
tion major Jonathan Mracko 
said, "The new facebook is 



creepy, but it honestly does- 
n't affect me either way. It's 
still a useful tool around 
campus." 

After only withstanding 
three days of a brutal 
onslaught against the new 
facebook, Zuckerberg 

released his formal apology. 

Now, I guess, the new- 
new facebook (or something 
along those lines) allows 
members to have control 
over what gets posted on 
their News Feed. 

Ending his statement, 
Zuckerberg said, "This may 
sound silly, but I want to 
thank all of you who have 
written in and created 
groups and protested. Even 
though I wish I hadn't made 
so many of you angry, I am 
glad we got to hear you. And 
I am also glad that News 
Feed highlighted all these 
groups so people could find 
them and share their opin- 
ions with each other as 
well." 

This showed me that 
membership approval and 
dedication to his fans is still 
very important to him 
despite becoming very rich 



and quite powerful over the 
past few years. 

Zuckerman has made it 
very clear what he believes 
in, "...helping people share 
information with the people 
they want to share it with." 

I know that I use 
Facebook at least once a day 
and that most of the people I 
talk to are people that I do 
not normally get to see on a 
daily basis. Without the 
help of facebook, (I'm a face- 
book fan myself, not much of 
a sucker for MySpace) I 
would not be able to talk to 
these people at all. 

As of right now, I would 
like to retract my initial 
statement in my Status 
Window on facebook "I am 
feeling extra stalkerish, 
thanks to facebook's newest 
addition. Yeah! Stalking 
people." After a few days to 
think about it, Zuckerman 
was just trying to stream- 
line our experience and give 
us another way to connect to 
our friends. 



The talent that lies within 



Robyn Gray 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rlgray®clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 12 - 
Students trickled into the 
Gemmell Ritazza rotunda 
shortly after 8 p.m. on 
Tuesday, Sept. 12 for this 
fall semester's first open mic 
night. 

As the equipment was 
being set up, students from 
all different backgrounds 
and groups gathered on the 
comfy couches to hear some 
quality entertainment from 
their fellow classmates and 
friends. 

The first rock band that 
performed played about 
three songs, but the sound 
in the rotunda was not great 
for their style of music. 
Some kids were commenting 
on this and claimed that it 
was because of the large 
open space and high ceilings 
that caused their music to 
have too much of an echo. 

Nonetheless, students 
were still interested in see- 
ing what the other soloists 
and groups had in store for 
them. 

This, after all, was a 
great way to get students 
together and socializing, 




along with getting the fresh- 
men out of their dorms and 
experiencing what types of 
free entertainment Clarion 
University provides. 

When Josh Klugh took 
the mic, those passing 
through Gemmell on their 
way to and from the recre- 
ation center stopped on the 
overlooking balcony and 
steps to watch. 

Klugh started off with a 
song he wrote himself, titled 
"Chip In," and followed up 
with a cover of "I'll Be," by 
Edwin McCain. Applause 
was loud, and shouts for an 
"Encore!" rang out. 

When asked about his 
experience with this open 
mic, Klugh replied, "This is 
actually my first open mic 
since I'm a freshman, but I 
really hope they have more 
of these... especially more in 
the area overall." 



Klugh also said, "I only 
do this for a hobby and for 
fun. I don't really plan on 
going anywhere with it, but 
I do plan on doing it for the 
rest of my life in bars and 
small venues." 

Like Klugh, many other 
performers sang popular 
songs by Jack Johnson, 
Edwin McCain, Oasis, and 
acoustic groups similar to 
these. 

The sound on songs of 
that type was much better 
than the heavier rock and 
metal types, but either way, 
some students sat down 
with their laptops and 
homework and clearly found 
the music relaxing while 
tending to their studies. 

Ritazza employee 

Danielle Geis commented, 
"I've worked during many 
open mic nights and I've 
never seen it this crowded, 
especially for a first semes- 
ter. Look at all the kids on 
the balcony and the steps! 
It's amazing." 

It looks as if Clarion is 
off to a good start with their 
open mic nights and hope- 
fully, even more local talent 
will appear at the next one 
held. 



Timberlake takes a big step 



Glenn Gamboa 
Newsday 



Justin Timberlake is 
always selling. It's probably 
what he does best. 

He's slick, stylish, 
bringing-back sexy and he 
knows how to give the peo- 
ple what they want. He has 
a gift for packaging -- from 
his well-choreographed 
dance moves to his well- 
timed genre hopping, he 
has a strong sense of what 
will work and what won't. 
And his new album, 
"FutureSex/LoveSounds" 
(Jive), reflects that. 

"Future Sex/ Love 
Sounds" is well crafted with 
producer Timbaland ■■ who 
provides Timberlake with 
the same sexed-up guidance 
and envelope-pushing 
dance beats that brought 
Nelly Furtado back to the 
top of the charts with 
"Promiscuous" " and like 



nearly all of Timberlake's 
work with 'N Sync and on 
his debut "Justified," it is 
remarkably likable. 

The dizzying 
"SexyBack' is Timberlake 
at his best, mainstreaming 
a combination of the wild, 
edgy dance-pop style of 
Basement Jaxx with Missy 
Elliott's more experimental 
hip -hop to create a boldly 
inventive sound that still 
pleases the masses. 

It's a mix he mines for 
much of "Future Sex/ Love 
Sounds," taking an older 
sound and twisting it to 
make it sound fresh. 

Timberlake's salesman- 
like talents give him the 
confidence to pull off sound- 
ing like the Mary Jane 
Girls on the title track or 
filling the hook girl, er, per- 
son, role on "Chop Me Up," 
as Timbaland and Three 
Six Mafia take the song 
over. He even reprises him- 
self on "What Goes Around 



...," which is essentially 
"Cry Me a River II (The 
Sequel)," from the hand- 
claps and skittering beat to 
the tempo. 

And he clearly has a 
thing for royalty on this 
album, whether it's the 
numerous stylistic refer- 
ences to Prince (from the 
elimination of spaces 
between words in song 
titles to "Sexy Ladies" and 
especially "Until the End of 
Time," which even uses the 
same palette of synthesizer 
sounds from Prince's 
"Purple Rain" album) or his 
love of "King of Pop"-era 
Michael Jackson, which 
livens up the otherwise 
plodding and plain 
"Summer Love." 

All this will undoubtedly 
sell well. However, "Future 
Sex/ Love Sounds" is also 
the first sign that 
Timberlake may want 
something more. 



Page 7 



THE CLARION CALL 



September 14. 2006 



This gives babysitting a new meaning 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_sedent®clarlon,edu 

CLARION, Sept. 14 - Of 
all the books that I read this 
summer, one in particular 
comes to mind: "The Nanny 
Diaries" by Emma 
McLaughlin and Nicola 
Kraus. This book controlled 
my life, well that and the 
strep throat that I contract- 
ed, for about two and a half 
days. 

The book begins with 
the heading "The 

Interview," where the world 
of ridiculously wealthy 
women is displayed very 
vividly. These women spend 
hours deciding what their 
children can and cannot eat 
and what they wear, but 
they barely spend any time 
with their kids. 

The main character, 
Nanny (ironic, 1 know), tells 
about her babysitting expe- 
riences in dealing with 
wealthy families and their 
children. Nanny is a child 
development major at New 
York University. She focuses 
mainly on the X family and 
their son Grayer, who 
Nanny gives the nicknames 



the luxurious life with 
absolutely no worries except 
for where Grayer will be 
going to private school at, 
Mr X, on the other hand, is 
constantly at the office and 
gives Grayer even less 
attention than his wife does. 

The relationship begins 
over a coffee date where 
Mrs. X gets to know Nanny 
at a one-onone basis and 
then she slowly works her 
way into Grayer's daily life. 
Grayer obviously rejects 
Nanny at this point, which 
is weird because at first 
meeting, they got along fan- 
tasticly. Eventually, after a 
few days of resistance and 
the loss of his old nanny. 
Grayer finally warms up to 
Nanny. 

Mr. and Mrs. X's rela- 
tionship slowly begins to 
deteriorate when it is dis- 
covered that he has been 
cheating on her with a 
woman known as Ms. 
Chicago. 

This is very ironic 
because Mrs. X had an affair 
with Mr. X while he was still 
in his first marriage, which 
Nanny finds out from her 
Harvard Hottie. 

The constant fighting 



two brings Nanny and 
Grayer closer together 
bt^cau.se she is all that he 
has. 

In the process of all of 
this drama, Nanny still 
manages to find a man who 
is referred to as Harvard 
Hottie or HH. Although he 
has .seen her in some of the 
worst situations, including 
having to dress up as a tele- 
tubby to accompany Grayer 
to his father's Halloween 
party, he still makes every 
attempt to keep in contact 
with her. 

The story ends with a 
vacation to Nantucket that 
is brought on by the fact 
that Mrs. X has had it with 
Ms. Chicago. Ms. Chicago at 
this point has already tried 
to get Nanny on her side 
and has given her hundreds 
of dollars to set up a won- 
derful weekend in the X's 
apartment for her and Mr. 
X. 

The trip, in my opinion, 
is one of the craziest experi- 
ences that Nanny endures 
throughout the book. Being 
trapped in that house with 
the entire X family, who not 
only does not know her, but 
does not know their son 



utter chaos. 

The X's begin to rekin- 
dle their relationship, but 
low and behold, along comes 
Ms. Chicago to mess every- 
thing up again. 

Not only does Ms. 
Chicago cause some prob- 
lems in Nantucket, but Mrs. 
X calls in reinforcements: 
her motherin-law, the origi- 
nal Mrs. X. 

Nanny's family becomes 
very worried about her 
working for the X's. Nanny 
is a full-time student at 
NYU and trying to gradu- 
ate, meanwhile, Mrs. X has 
her working over 50 hours a 
week. She thought the cash 
would be rolling in after 
working so many hours, but 
in reality, Mrs. X did not pay 
her for overtime. 

The X's asked Nanny to 
leave Nantucket because 
they decided that they no 
longer wanted her to be 
associated with Grayer. 
Once back in the city, Nanny 
discovers that they had been 
looking to replace her for 
quite sometime, due to the 
fact that she did not arrive 
in Nantucket as early as 
possible because she was 
graduating. 



not only hv humorous, but 
disturbing at the same time. 
The situations from Nanny's 
perspective is very funny, 
but when 1 thought about 
how this woman and her 
husband know absolutely 
nothing about their child 
and that they almost look at 
him as an accessory to their 
busy Uves, it makes me sick. 
Grayer, although starting 
out difficult, is one of the 
sweetest kids I have ever 
read about. He develops an 
untouchable relationship 
with Nanny, who in some 
ways almost takes the place 
of both his mother and his 
best friend. His mother 
makes it very well known 
that she has no time for 
Grayer's pettiness. 

My personal favorite 
thing about Grayer's char- 
acter is that he wears his 
father's card everyday. This, 
to me, .shows that all he 
wants is his father's love 
and affection, something 
that obviously Mr. X is hav- 
ing some trouble showing. 

If Mrs. X put as much 
effort into getting to know 
her son as she does to hav- 
ing her nails and shows 
match. Grayer would be the 



Mr. X gave Grayer as much 
attention as he does Ms. 
Chicago, may bo his son 
wouldn't become hysterical 
everytime his father walks 
out the door for work. 

I think that not only 
child development majors, 
but any person who has ever 
babysat in their life would 
enjoy this book thoroughly. 
It had to the ability to make 
me laugh hysterically and 
then become extremely con- 
cerned and deeply disturbed 
within a few pages of each 
other 

As a person who has 
been babysitting since she 
was 13, I really fell in lovi' 
with this book. 

For those people who 
are not big fans of books. 1 
have good news: it is going 
to be a movie. That's right. 
In 2007 this movie will bo 
coming to theatres starring 
Scarlett Johansson. I pei- 
sonally am very excited 
about this movie. (Another 
good movie that came out 
that is based on a book is 
"The Devil Wears Prada" 
starring Anne Hathaway 
and Meryl Streep and is 
written by Lauren 

Weisberger) 



Grover and G. Mrs. X lives that goes on between these either, would be pure and 1 found this book to be happiest kid alive Also if 

Amiel's album makes me want to be a swan 



Dominic Giallombardo 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_djgiallomb@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept 14 - 
"Accident by Design" a 
recent album by Amiel is 
an accident waiting to 
happen. This album is an 
interesting arrangement 
of psychedelic Beach Boy- 
esque songs. 

Amiel is a singer/song- 
writer/producer from New 
Jersey, who got his start 
in a converted dental 
office. He wrote this 
album while on a retreat 
in Sao Paulo, Brazil. 
Amiel has played in 
numerous New York City 
venues such as the Living 



Room, CB's Gallery and 
the Knitting Factory. 

Stephen Cook, from 
the "All Music Guide," 
stated that, "Amiel pro- 
duced this array of folky 
California pop songs with 
a healthy dose of the 
Beatles and XTC in mind, 
not to mention a few 
whiffs of bossa nova and 
soundtrack atmospherics." 
Don't get me wrong, I do 
agree with Cook some- 
what, but 1 also feel that 
this album had a certain 
feel to it that was unusual 
and unwelcome. 

Most of the lyrics are 
respectable, for example 
Amiel talks in track two, 
"People Watching," about 
people posing for cameras 




ACCIPENTS 



and sticking to their own 
agendas in life. He talks 
about how people are 
quick to blame others and 
how people believe others 
have it better in life. 

In any other song for- 



mat, 1 would applaud this 
song as riveting and pro- 
found. Unfortunately, the 
music to which it is set, 
makes these lyrics sound 
as if there should be 
flower pedals spinning in 



'Wicker' remake requires active viewers 



the air as one would skip 
merrily through a field (If 
listening to the song, 
pause now to dance along 
and shimmy a little). 

In track four, "Where 
Time Moves Slower," there 
is a repeating verse of 
"Something's in my eye." 
After being repeated nine 
times in a round, it makes 
me think what would hap- 
pen if I put something in 
his eye? Preferably some 
sort of sharpened object? 

Track five, "Vacuum," 
is an instrumental piece. 
This song reminds me of 
meditation music or quite 
possibly a song played in 
interpretive dance class. 
Now 1 am a tree, now I am 
a bush. And the swan flies 



away. Fly swan, fly! 

Overall, 1 rate this 
album one and a half 
leaves. It has its moments 
and everyone loves a good 
1970's meets techno tune 
now and again. For me, 
the highlight was a stag- 
gering track 11, "Between 
Locators," which was an 
amazing 43 seconds with 
no lyrics. Brilliant! 

Amiel has a new sound 
that some may find 
appealing, I just don't 
think the rest of us are 
ready to accept it quite 
yet. I'd just like to point 
out that I wasted an hour 
of my life listening to this 
album, so that you would 
not have to. 



Grace Regalado 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gvregalado@clai ion.edu 

Amy Kaylor 
Business Manager 

s_arnl<aylor@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept 14 - The 
Warner Bros. 2006 remake 
of Anthony Shaffer's 1973 
horror classic "The Wicker 
Man" ended its first week 
in the box offices at num- 
ber three with 
$11,740,235. The movie 
managed to stay in the top 
10 for ,two weeks before 
falling out. 

"The Wicker Man," 
rated PG-13 and starring 
Nicholas Cage §tid Kate 
Beahan, was written and 



directed by Neil LaBute. In 
the movie. Cage plays 
police officer Edward 
Malus, who travels to the 
secluded Summersisle to 
help his ex-girlfriend 
Willow (Beahan) find her 
missing daughter and to 
search for answers as to 
why Willow suddenly dis- 
appeared shortly before 
their wedding date. 

While on the island. 
Cage struggles through 
trying to pry information 
from the highly secretive, 
wiccan communit.. Cage 
quickly learns that there 
are some cultures that 
have their own unique 
beliefs about humankind's 
relationship with Earth, 
and then refuse to adapt to 



the rules and beliefs of 
modern society. 

If psychological 

thrillers with a severe 
twist at the end strike any- 
one's fancy, go see "The 
Wicker Man." 

Grace-This is a type of 
movie of which I've never 
witnessed anything like 
before. Although it is cate- 
gorized under the "horror" 
genre, 1 personally was not 
scared. It was more of a 
thriller to my judgment. 

The beginning was a 
little slow, but the entire 
story definitely keeps you 
on your toes. 

The setting and fash- 
ions styled in this movie 
were appealing. This was 
one of those movies you 



would actively have to 
engage yourself in to fully 
comprehend and appreci 
ate. 

Grace rates this movie 
2.5, and Amy rates this 
movie 3. 

If looking for some- 
thing to intellectually 
stimulating this weekend, 
give this movie a try. But 
if only looking to see a 
laugh out loud comedy like 
one that will make people 
run to the restroom or 
snack bar without missing 
any major plot twists you 
might want to aim for a 
movie more like Beerfest. 



Mary Walter Leadership Development Series 

Fall 2006 - In the Gemmell Student Complex at 7-8 pm 

Sponsored by the Office of Campus Life 
Questions can be directed to Student Coordinator Ashley Walker at MWLeadership@clarion.edu 



Session 1; Wed. Oct. 4 

"Missed Opportunities" 
Room 250-252 



Session 4: Wed. Oct. 25 

"Getting Involved Within 

Your College Community" 

Room 250-252 



SessionZ: Wed. Oct. 11 

"Abandon the Path and Leave a Trail" 
Room 250-252 



Session 5: Wed. Nov. 1 



"Choosing to Be Champions in Life' 
Room 250-252 

Session 7: Wed. Nov. 15 

"Benefits of Being Involved" 
Room 250-252 



Session 3: Wed. Oct. 18 

"Going the Extra Mile: 

A Parable of Success" 

Room 146 

Session 6: Tue. Nov. 7 

"Why Does It Matter Now? 
Room 250-252 



Season Premieres 

Among broadcast shows returning with new episodes this 

week: 

SUNDAY 

The Amazing Race," 8:30 p.m., CBS 

MONDAY 

"Wife Swap." 8 p.m., ABC 

'Deal or No Deal," 8 p.m., NBC 

"How I Met Your Mother," 8:30 p.m., CBS. Starring Neil 

Patrick Harris. 

"Two and a Half Men,': 9 p.m., CBS 

The New Adventures of Old Christine," 9:31 p.m., CBS 

€SI: Miami," 10 p.m., CBS 

TUESDAY 

"NCIS," 8 p.m., CBS 

The Unit," 9 p.m., CBS 

'Law & Order: Criminal Intent," 9 p.m., NBC 

"Boston Legal." 10 p.m., ABC 

"Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," 10 p.m., NBC ^ 

WEDNESDAY : 

'The Biggest Lo.ser," 8 p.m., NBC I 

"America's Next Top Model," 8 p.m., CW 
"Criminal Minds," 9 p.m., CBS 
"CSI: NY" 10 p.m., CBS 

THURSDAY 

"My Name Is Earl," 8 p.m., NBC 

The Office." 8:30 p.m., NBC 

"Grey's Anatomy," 9 p.m., ABC. Starring Chandra Wilson 

"CSI." 9 p.m., CBS 

"ER," 9:69 p.m., NBC 



FRIDAY 

"WWE Friday Night SmackDown!" 8 p.m., CW 

"Ghost Whisperer," 8 p.m., CBS 

'Close to Home," 9 p.m., CBS 

"Numb3rs." 10 p.m., CBS 

"Law & Order," 10 p.m.. NBC 



SATURDAY 

'Dateline NBC," 8 p.m., NBC 

48 Hours Mystery,": 10 p.m., NBC 

Washington Post 



I 



Page 8 



Ttffi CLARION CALL 



September 14. 2006 



llissilMs 



(im'k Ids, TnivH. Kiiipliiuiii'nl, For Itcnl, Wnmk anil kwA \k 




ZTA Only the best crowned! 
Come check us out on 9/14, 
9/18. 9/20. 

Congrats to sister of the 
week Emma Kelly! 

We love our AZ sisters! 
AZ love & ours, 
Marcie & Erin 




Come meet the Eagle 
Ambassadors. First meeting 
is Sept. 20 at 6:00 p.m. 

Sky Enterprises, come game 
with us! Two doors down 
from Bob's Subs. 

2 Students looking for 1 stu- 
dent to share apt.- 5 min. 
from CUP. Each has own 
BR. Low rent. Available for 
f]all and Spring Semesters. 
814-745-2215, cell 221-0480 
or 814-764-3754. 



FIZZ! FOCUS! FUEL 
GOOD with LIFTOFF! 
NEW Effervescent Energy 
Drink Fight fatigue ~ 
Improve Mental 

Performance. Contact SAN- 
DRA AMATO Local 
Herbalife Independent 
Distributor (814) 764-3346 
www.getliftoffnow.com/ 
samato. 

Beautiful blue electric gui- 
tar for sale. Includes lOw. 
amp, case, electric tuner 
and more. Contact 
s_sdkurtz@clarion.edu 

Brand new TV show for 
WCUB-TV 

A new series for the campus 
television station is being 
developed, and we are look- 
ing for writers, actors, and 
tech crew. This show is 
going to be a sketch comedy 
series, similar to SNL. If 
you are interested, or would 
like more information, 
please email Tom 

McMeekin, WCUB 

Production Manager, at 
s_tjmcmeekin@clarion.edu. 
For other information about 



WCUB-TV, contact Station 
Manager Dan Rinkus at 
s_dprinkus@clarion.edu 




One bedroom apt. fully fur- 
nished. Available Fall 2006- 
Spring 2007. Accomodates 
1-2. Call Patty at 814-745- 
3121 or 814-229-1683. www. 
lakenapartments.com 

Two Bedroom apt. Fully fur- 
nished. Available Fall 2006- 
Spring 2007. Call Patty at 
814-745-3121 or 814-229- 
1683. www. lakenapart- 
ments.com 

A selection of houses and 
apts. available for Fall 2006- 
Spring 2007. Some close to 
campus. Fully furnished. 
Accomodations from 1-8 
people. Call Patty at 814- 
745-3121 or 814-229-1683. 
www. lakenapartments.com 

Room in Victorian Home 
close to University, reason- 
abe, includes all utilities & 
cable. Available Fall & 



Spring. Call 814-226-5442 
or after 1 p.m. 814-226- 
5651. 

Serious Students! Are you 
looking for a FREE PLACE 
to live? Do you like horses? 
We offer free room and 
board in our home for occa- 
sional chores and house sit- 
ting. 7 miles from campus. 
Call Gwen at 814- 379-3759 
or gwwills@pennswoods.net 

House for rent, with five 
bedroom8/2-baths for five 
students. Available for 
spring and fall 2007 and 
spring 2008. Washer, Dryer, 
Stove and Refrigerator 
included, off street parking, 
$1050.00 per semester per 
student + utilities. Call 814- 
226-8185 and leave a mes 
sage. 



800-648-4849. Great Group 
Discounts. 

I ^^^^^^ i_._Lii<miiiniiiT-iiTniriiiiiinii 1 

ChK't, 

It's your turn to clean the 

bathroom. 

- XOXO 



Dear Roomies. 
Do your dishes! 
- Dominic 

Ali.sha & MK. 

We are sorry to hear about 

the loss of your beloved fish. 

Maybe if you were better 

parents and didn't leave the 

country, they would last 

more than three days. 

Love, 

Amy & Lindsay 



Oreo Wrap, 

I hope that school is going 

well for you. I've been very 

proud of your navigation 

skills lately. Keep up the 

good work. 

1> Atomic Wing 

Amy, 

Make me dinner. 

- Doni 

Dom, 

Make your own dinner. 

- Amy 

Happy Birthday Amy and 

Tina. 

-The Call Staff 

Dear Mike, 
We're gonna fight! 
¥ Amy 



Happy first birthday Phiel. i love David Keremes. 




Keep on swimmin' 

- Mom 



» Steph 



year's top 10 Spring Break 
Destinations! Best deals 
guaranteed! Highest rep 
commissions. Visit 

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Ci-star & the new staff, 
Make me proud- get done by 
11 this .semester & I'll give 
you a surprise! 
- Tom 



LC- 

1 love having you in my life 

now! 

V BK 

Newspaper is fun. 



HOME 




ALONc 



How much do you remember? 



Take the Quiz! 



Take The Clarion CaU "Home Alone" Quiz! 
by Bryan Bingham 

1. Where does Kevin live? 

'a) Miami c) Dallas 

b) Chicago d) Aspen 

2. Where was the first family vacation held? 

a) California c) Paris 

b) Hawaii d) Mexico 

3. What soda did Fuller (Kevin's younger brother drink? 

a) Pepsi c) Sprite 

b) Coca-cola d) Orange 

4. What were the names of the two villains? 
b) Harry and Marv 

b) Alex and Jimmy 

c) Joe and Daniel 

d) Mark and Harry 

5. What food was Kevin eating when the villains showed 

9 



6. Kevin's mother's name is 

a) Casey 

b) Karen 



c) 
d) 



Kate 
Christa 



up.' 
■a) 
b) 
■c) 
-d) 



ice cream sundae 

cheese pizza 

KFC 

macaroni and cheese 



7. What did Kevin steal from the drug store? 

a) candy bar c) shaving cream 

b) toothbrush d) money 

8. The second family vacation was to . 

a) England c) New York 

b) Paris d) Florida 

9. The owner of the toy store was named . 

a) Mr. Wyatt c) Mr. Peterson 

b) Mr. Duncan d) Mr. Jacobs 

10. The villains went by what alias in "Home Alone" 
number 1 . 

a) sticky bandits c) sly bandits 

b) sneeky bandits d) wet bandits 



'POl. 'Cj'B 'P"8«'qz '0'9 'P"9 'Bf 'B'C 'oZ 'q i. ;sj9Msue 



Look for chances to win prizes &om our exclusive Claiion CaU giveaways. 



You're Invitei 

The Eagle Ambassadors would li 
to extend an invitation to you to jo| 
their organization. 

Tlic first i^erunal nuu'lifi.i,^ is on StnjN.'nibt' 
at H p.m. in the board room :!* '^' 

AdvanaiTRiU. Crntcr. 

It is the two story rod brick buiidiii 

located on (Iret'iivillc Avenue, 

just below Becker Hall 



Th(^ Kagle Auibassiidors are mv ■ 
prestigious student ^oups on eanipus, 

Kagle Ambassador, you will be exposd 
many valuable exjx-Tience^ "-'Itidi 
interacting with prolessionally ,.. 
Clarion Universiiy graduate' 
with individuals in direct coiiiiCC(i«iii \s 
president of the university, and having 
in decision-making pro 

to improve and advance Clarion 



m 



Please KSVI^ to 
eagleambas8adors@hotniaj. 
by P>iday, vSeptember 1 S, 




audra mcguire 

Sophomore, Elem./ Special Ed. 
"In my history honors class with Mr. 
Chariarre. His son was in New York City." 




Bethany Ross 

"Where were you 

on September 11, 

2001?" 




Bill Weaver 

Gemmell Food Court Employee 

"At home with my mom and getting ready 

for work when I saw it on TV." 






Mike Davis 

Senior, Spixial Education 

"I was a senior in high school in 

science class. I wasn't allowed to 

leave the room all day." 



Marc Steigerwald 

Senior, Communication 
"I was a senior in high school. We turned 
on the T.V. in third period and 10 minutes 

later the second plane hit. " 



Joe Kirkpatrick 

Senior, Marketing 
"At Lycoming College visiting a friend." 



LiNDSEV Murphy 

Sophomore, Elementary 

Education 

"In my high school civics class with 

Mr. Antuano, third row. second seat, 

taking notes." 




September 14. 2006 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



Football falls at Kutztown 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s ekbowserdclarion.edu 

KUTZTOWN, Sept. 9 - The 
Golden Eagles Football 
team dropped their record 
on the young season to 0-2 
with a 27-10 loss at 
Kutztown on Saturday 
night. 

The Golden Eagles 
played solid throughout the 
first half and grabbed an 
early lead on a 22 yard field 
goal by senior Kyle Snoke. 
After falling behind 6-3, the 
Golden Eagles came back 
and took a 10-6 lead with 
5:35 remaining in the half 
on a 25 yard touchdown 
pass by freshman quarter- 
back Mark Rupert to sopho- 
more Dane Williams. 

Kutztown's Maurice 
Adams then took over the 
next few minutes of the 
game. 

Adams scored on a two 
yard touchdown run with 



26-seconds remaining in the 
second quarter. On the 
opening kickoff of the sec- 
ond half, Adams struck 
again returning the kick 85 
yards for a touchdown and 
giving Kutztown a 20-10 
cushion. 

The Golden Eagles 
failed to score the rest of the 
game despite moving the 
ball. 

"We ran the ball well 
and moved good, but didn't 
score enough points," first 
year head coach Jay Foster 
said. Clarion rushed for 186 
yards and outgained 
Kutztown 324-323 in total 
yards. 

"Eddie Emanuel and the 
offensive line are playing 
very well and the passing 
game got better," Foster 
said. 

Emanuel led Clarion 
with 88 rushing yards on 16 
carries. 

Foster said that Rupert 
is improving and needs to 
continue to do so. Rupert 



completed 11 of his 38 pass- 
es with one touchdown and 
added eight rushes for 36 
yards. 

"Defensively, our line- 
backers and Jim Simmons, 
our defensive tackle, are 
playing well, but we are giv- 
ing up too much through the 
air, too many big plays," 
said Foster. 

"We must stop giving up 
the big plays and create 
some turnovers," Foster 
said. "We have a lot of 
improvement to go yet but 
the players are working 
hard at it." 

The most important thing 
for the Golden Eagles, "We 
have got to score more and 
keep people off the score- 
board," Foster said. 

The Golden Eagles will 
get another chance at their 
first victory of the season 
when they play host to West 
Chester in the home opener 
this Saturday at 6 p.m. 



yard touchdown run with continue to do so. Rupert 

Ortiz says comments about Jeter 
were taken out of context 



David Heuschkel 
Washington Post 



BALTIMORE - Manny 
Ramirez strategically 

placed a copy of Tuesday's 
New York Post on the floor 
right in front of David 
Ortiz's locker with the back 
page face up. A picture of 
Ortiz and Yankees shortstop 
Derek Jeter was accompa- 
nied with the headline 
"Derek & Goliath." Under 
the photo, it read, 
"Determined David disses 
Jeter MVP talk." 

It was quite obvious 
that Ramirez wanted his 
teammate to see it " until 
he looked up and noticed a 
reporter had seen it unfold, 
at which point Ramirez 
picked up the newspaper 
and got rid of it. 

Ortiz was upset that his 
comments about the MVP 
race, first pubUshed Sunday 
the Boston Globe, in which 
he made the point that 
power hitters are more 
deserving of the MVP than a 
Derek Jeter -- whom he did 
say was having a great year 
" because they do more for 
their team. 

The Post headline and 
other headlines in New York 
made it seem like Ortiz was 



saying he should win the 
award over the Yankees cap- 
tain. And that, Ortiz said 
Tuesday, could not be fur- 
ther than the truth. 
"Hell no! C'mon, dude. That 
guy is one of my favorite 
players," Ortiz said. "You 
never talk (smack) about 
Derek Jeter, bro. It's wrong. 
That guy plays his (butt) 
off." 

Ortiz said he straight- 
ened out the situation with 
Jeter even though he did not 
speak directly to him. 

"I look like a freaking 
(idiot) out there because 
people haven't heard what I 
said," Ortiz said. "Now I 
talked to a whole bunch of 
people. Now they know my 
side. Especially knowing 
me, I'm ^lot a (smack) talk- 
er." 

Ortiz admitted to being 
upset and said he was both- 
ered the most from "when 
people say things that I 
haven't said. What is out 
there, that they said I 
should be the MVP and all 
that buUcrap." 

Ortiz was taken aback 
by a wire version of the 
story that ran in USA Today 
with a photo of him and cap- 
tion that says he believes he 
should be MVP. The New 
York media undoubtedly 
will be waiting for Ortiz and 



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the Red Sox, who play a 
four-game series this week- 
end at Yankee Stadium. 
Ortiz said he is not wor- 
ried. 

"It's all good," Ortiz said. "I 
bring my boys from New 
York, they whoop any- 
body's (butt). I'll be walk- 
ing with them (dudes). ... 
'You want some of this?"' 

Ramirez was not in the 
lineup because his right 
knee was bothering him. 
He has not started 13 of 
the past 20 games, a 
stretch that began Aug. 22 
in Anaheim. 

"I'm gonna be the 
MVP!" Ramirez said to 
nobody in particular as he 
emerged from a lounge in 
the clubhouse. 

Later on, as the Red 
Sox were stretching before 
batting practice. Orioles 
DH Kevin Millar walked 
over and told Ramirez, 
'Tou got to play to win the 
MVP." 

All joking aside. 
Manager Terry Francona 
was asked if the team 
would consider shutting 
down Ramirez for the sea- 
son. 

"If we have to," 
Francona said. "I'd rather 
not. I guess we could get to 
a point where the trainers 
say that's the right thing to 
do, but I haven't heard 
them say that yet. I think 
it comes down to what he 
can tolerate." 



Soccer wins pair on the road 



Robert Ranl<in 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



CLARION. Sept. 11 - This 
season the Golden Eagles 
soccer team has jumped out 
to a 4-2 start with a 1-1 
record in the PSAC West. 

After starting off last 
week with a 3-0 loss at 
California University of 
Pennsylvania, Clarion has 
won its last two games with 
a 2-0 victory at Davis and 
Elkins and a 2-1 win at 
West Virginia Wesleyan. 

In the win at Davis and 
Elkins, sophomore Nicole 
Scott and junior Ashley 
Downs each scored a goal to 
lead the Golden Eagles to 
victory. 



In the Golden Eagles 
next victory, it was sopho- 
more Rachael Schmitz and 
senior Ashlie Regazzi who 
scored in the 2-1 victory 
over West Virginia 
Wesleyan. 

Coach Christina Alonzo 
says that it is the teams 
goalkeeper that has led the 
team, "Our goalkeeper 
Jessica Reed stands out a 
lot. She is a junior this year 
and she shows leadership on 
the team and she plays with 
passion everyday." 

Reed has allowed only 
seven goals in the teams 
first six games of the season. 

The Golden Eagles hope 
to be in the thick of the con- 
ference throughout the sea- 
son. 



"Our goal for the season 
is to stay in the mix of the 
conference and at least stay 
in the middle of the stand- 
ings," Alonzo said. 

"We have a very exciting 
team, we have had a very 
smooth preseason and the 
freshman that have came in 
this year are looking really 
good and they have a lot of 
potential." 

Coming up next for the 
Golden Eagles is a home 
date with Slippery Rock 
University on Wednesday 
Sept. 13. 

The Golden Eagles will 
then follow that up with a 
trip to Edinboro University 
on Saturday. 



Peyton victorious in "The Manning Bowl" 



Sam Farmer 
Washington Post 

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. 
- They stood side by side, as 
close as their shoulder pads 
would allow. Big brother 
reached over and patted lit- 
tle brother's back, mussed 
his hair, whispered words of 
encouragement in his ear. It 
was a personal, post-game 
moment Sunday night 
between the Mannings, two 
of the NFL's most talked- 
about quarterbacks. 

Just Peyton, Eli and 
mere inches away, a few 
hundred photographers 
behind a sea of camera lens- 
es. 

"I just told him I loved 
him," Peyton said, whose 
Indianapolis Colts beat Eli's 
New York Giants, 26-21, 
before a packed house at 
Giants Stadium. "Told him I 
was proud of the way he 
competed. I enjoyed watch- 
ing him play in person; he's 
every bit as good as he 
looked on TV to me." 

The Mannings, separat- 
ed by five years and oppos- 
ing NFL conferences, had 
never played football 
against each other at any 
level other than backyard 
games. In fact, this was the 
first time Peyton had ever 
seen Eli play live as a pro. 

The duel lived up to its 
billing. In part, the outcome 
hinged on a questionable 
offensive pass interference 
call on receiver Tim Carter 
that wiped out a big first 
down for the comeback- 
minded Giants. On the next 
play, a third-and-11 from 
the New York 9, Eli made 
one of his few gaffes of the 
game, badly overthrowing 
his receiver with a pass that 
was intercepted. That set up 



the Colts' final score, a 
demoralizing fourth field 
goal by new kicker Adam 
Vinatieri. , 

Giants Coach Tom 
Coughhn, wildly waving his 
arms and bright red in the 
face, screamed at officials 
after the call on Carter. 
Asked about it later, though, 
he chose his words carefully. 

'There's no place for me 
to go talking about penal- 
ties," he said. "I expressed 
myself on the field to the 
officials. It's a shame 
because we got the ball out 
there near midfield, and 
that's where it should have 
been. I was standing right 
there. It's very difficult for 
me to think that kind of play 
is a foul." 

After the game, the 
Manning parents stared 
blankly from their perch in 
the Reebok luxury suite 
before gathered their 
belongings and somberly 
shuffling to the door. They 
reconvened in a room in the 
bowels of the stadium to 
dole out hugs to their sons. 
"I'm glad we don't have to go 
through this for a few more 
years," mother Olivia said. 

Then, perking up, she 
added: "I guess I'd take it if 
they managed to get to a 
Super Bowl together. That 
would be all right." 

At times Sunday, both 
teams looked as if they 
could wind up being playoff 
contenders. And both also 
looked flawed. The Colts 
rolled up 272 yards passing 
but seemed to miss Pro 
Bowl running back Edgerrin 
James, now with the 
Arizona Cardinals. 
Their defense could do little 
to stop New York's running 
game, which amassed 186 
yards on the ground, led by 
Tiki Barber's 18 carries for 



110 yards. 

"We did a good job 
against a good defense," Eli 
said, who threw two touch- 
down passes to Peyton's one, 
and had an 88.7 passer rat- 
ing to Peyton's 78.9. "We 
had no sacks and ran the 
ball really well, protected 
well and completed some 
good passes and made some 
plays. We just didn't make 
enough." 

As well as Barber 
played, he was merely a 
sideshow. This game was all 
about the Manning broth- 
ers, and was among the 
most eagerly anticipated 
regular season matchups in 
memory. The hype also took 
its toll on the brothers •■ and 
some of the people around 
them. 

"I've never been into a 
stadium, outside of when we 
played Kansas City after 
9/11, when they put an 
opposing player on the pro- 
gram," Giants defensive end 
Michael Strahan said, refer- 
ring to the cover featuring 
the Mannings. "Who made 
that decision? ... I found 
that a little offensive." 

Even Colts Coach Tony 
Dungy, while pleased about 
the final score, was eager to 
put the hubbub behind him. 
He said that to some degree 
he could understand 
Peyton's conflicting feelings. 
Dungy felt some of those 
when he returned to play 
Tampa Bay, where he was 
head coach from 1996 
through 2001. 

"I had that same feeling 
... but not of this magni- 
tude," Dungy said. "The 
buildup wore on all of us. 
Now we can concentrate on 
No. 2 without all the fan- 
fare." 




159 University llvd • Clorion, PA 16214 • 814-226-4740 • (larion.myownaportment.com 

Itt iMikird Vill*|es is twnid ky ClwiM Umrtruty (sMittiN, Ik. art wmmfiik by AHm ( O'Hait EdocitiM Strraiv Im 




VILLAGES 



\Nant to 
write sports 

for the 
Clarion Call? 



Contact: 

Eric Bowser 
Sports Editor 

X2380 or 
s_ekbowser@ 

ciarion.edu 



Pages 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



September 14. 2006 



(SlmitMi 



\imV Ilk Triiiii IjiiiiIiiuiii'iiI. For Iti'iil. IVi'\iiiiiils. iiiiil linicnil Ills 



QEiElmKS 



/TAOiily the best fcownedl 
Conu' t'hiH'k us out on 9/14. 
H/IH. 9/20, 

('on^i'ats to si.-^ter ot the 

week Kmma Kellyl 

»\/ 

We love our .\/ sisters! 
\/. love & oiu's. 
Marcie & Krin 



('lime meet the Kafjle 
Ambassadors. First meetintj 
i- Sept. 20 at VV-OO p.m. 

Sky Knterprises. come game 
with usi Two doors down 
from \\{)\)> Subs. 

2 Students looking for 1 stu- 
dent to share apt.- 5 min. 
fi'om CUP. Kach has own 
\\\{. Low rent. .Available foi- 
Fall and Spring Semesters. 
Sll-745-2215. cell 221-0180 
or ,SM-7(il-;}7r)l, 



FTZZ! FOCUS! FUEL 
cool) with LIFT-OFF! 
N'KW Kffervescent Knergy 
Drink Fight fatigue 
Improve Mental 

Performance. Contact SAN- 
I)K.\ .\M.\TO Local 

Herbalife Independent 

Distributor (HI 1) 764-3346 
w w w. get 1 iftoffnow.coiTi/ 
samato. 

Beautiful blue electric gui- 
tar for sale. Includes lOw. 
amp. case, electric tuner 
and more. Contact 
s_sdkurtzi<' clarion.edu 

Brand new T\ show for 
WCUB-TV 

.\ new series for the campus 
television station is being 
developed, and we are look- 
ing for writers, actors, and 
tech crew. This show is 
going to be a sketch comedy 
series, similar to SNL. If 
you are interested, or would 
like more information, 
please email Tom 

McMeekin. W(^UH 

Production Manager, at 
s_.t)iucmeekiniftcIarion.edu. 
For other information about 



WCUB-TV, contact Station 
Manager Dan Rinkus at 
s_dprinkusii" cIarion.edu 

EftPLdVlMENT 



Spring. Call SI 1-226-51 12 HOO-HIS- IS 19. Creat Group 
or after 1 p.m. HI i-22(!- Di.-cmint-^ 



.")6.">1, 



«MMi 



One bedroom apt. fully fur- 
nished. Available Fall 2006- 
Spring 2007. Accomodates 
1-2. Call Patty at HI 4-745- 
3121 orH14-229-16H3. www. 
lakenapartments.com 

'I\v'o Bedroom apt. Fully fur- 
nished. Available Fall 2006- 
Spring 2007. Call Patty at 
H14-745-3121 or H14-229- 
1683. www. lakenapart- 
ments.com 

A selection of houses and 
apts. available for Fall 2006- 
Spring 2007. Some close to 
campus. Fully furnished. 
.Vccomodations from 1-8 
people. Call Patty at 814- 
715-3121 or 814-229-1683. 
www. lakenapartments.com 

Room in V'ictoi'ian Home 
close to LIniversity. reason- 
abe. includes all utilities & 
cable. .Available Fall & 



Serious Students! Are you 

looking for a FRFF PLACK ( IikI, 
to live? Do you like horses',' 
We offer free room and 
board in our home for occa 
sional chores and hou.se sit 
ting. 7 miles from campus. 
Call Ciwen at 814- 3793759 
or gwwillsscpennswoods.net 

Hou.se for reiU. with li\i' 
bedrooms/2-baths for five 
students. Available for 
spring and fall 2007 and 
spring 2008. Washer, Diyer. 
Stove and Refrigerator 
included, off street parking. 
$1050.00 per .semester per 
student + utilities. Call 81 I 
226-8185 and leave a mes 
sage. 

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balhrooin. 
XO.XO 

Dear Kooiiiies, 
Do your dishes! 
Dominic 

.\lisha c^ iU\. 

We are .sorry to hear about 

the loss of your beloved fish. 

.Maybe if you were better 

parents and didn't leave the 

country, they would last 

more than three days. 

Love. 

.\niy i^ Lindsay 

Happy first birthday Phiel. 
Keep on swimmin". 
.Mom 

(istai' (.t the new staff, 
.Make me proud- get done by 
1 1 this .semester & I'll give 
you a surprise! 

Tom 



Oreo Wrap, 

I hope that school is going 

well for you. I've been very 

proud of your navigation 

-kills lately. Keep up the 

good work. 

1> .Xtomic Wing 

.\m>. 

.Make me dinner. 
Dom 

Dom, 

•Make your own dinner. 
.\mv 

Happy Birthday Amy and 

Tina. 
The ('i// Staff 

Dear Mike. 
We're gonna fight! 

V Amy 

I love David Keremes. 
^ Steph 



LC- 



ove having you in my life 



now: 
V BK 



Newspaper is fun. 



HOME 



H 



ow muc 



hdo 



I" Ml 



ALONc 



'ou remem 



ber? 



Take the Quiz! 



Take The Clarion CaU "Home Alone" Quiz! 
by Bryan Bingham 

1 . Where does Kevin live? 

a) Miami c) Dallas 

b) Chicago d) Aspen 

2. Where was the first family vacation held? 
a) California c) Paris 
I)) Hawaii d) Mexico 

3. What soda did P'uUer (Kevin's younger brother drink? 
a) Pepsi c) Sprite 

ii) Coca-cola A} Orange 

I. What were the names of the two villains? 

a) Harry and Marv 

b) .Alex and dim my 

c) -Joe and Daniel 
(I) Mark and Harry 

5. What food was Kevin eating when the villains showed 
up? 

a) ice cream sundae 

b) cheese pizza 

c) KFC 

(0 macart)ni and cheese 



6. Kevin's mother's name is . 

a) Casey c) Kate 

b) Karen d) Christa 



7. What did Kevin steal from the drug store? 

a) candy bar c) shaving cream 

b) toothbrush d) money 

8. The second family vacation was to . 

a) England c) New York 

b) Paris • d) Florida 



9. The owner of the toy store was named . 

a) Mr. Wyatt c) Mr. Peterson 

b) Mr. Duncan d) Mr. Jacobs 

10. The villains went by what alias in "Home .\lone" 
number 1 . 

a) sticky bandits c) sly bandits 

b) sneekv bandits d) wet bandits 



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You're Invited! 

Th(^ Eagle Ambassadors would like 

to extend an invitation to you to join 

their organization. 

The first general meetinj[> is on vSeptember 20 
at B p.m. in the board room at the 

Advancement Center. 

It is the two story red brick building 

located on (ireenville Avenue, 

just below Becker Hall 

The Eagle Ambassadors are one of the most 
prestigious student groups on campus. As an 

Eagle Ambassador, you will be exposed to 

many valuable experiences, including 

interacting with professionally accomplished 

Clarion University graduates, communicating 

with individuals in direct connection with the 

president of the university, and having input 

in decision-making processes 

to improve and advance Clarion University. 

Please RSVP to 

cagleambassadui b^^hotmaiLcom 

by Friflay, vSeptember 15. 








Al DKA IV1< Ci 


riKK 




Sol 


IK )M()I<I , IJ 


1 M./ Sp 


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Ed. 


"1 


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history 


honors class with Mr. 


Char 


iarre. 


His son was in 


New 


York City." 




Beth any Ross 



'Where were you 

on September II, 

2001?" 




Bill Wkaner 

Cil MMll I loon COURP Empi.oyic 

".At home with my mom and getting ready 
for work when 1 saw it on TV." 






MiKL Davis 

Si NK)R, Si'lt lAI [jilC AriON 

"J was a senior in high school in 

science class. I wasn't allowed to 

leave the room all dav." 



Mahc Sri;i<;KRWALi> 

Si NIOR, COMMINK AIION 

"I was a stMiior in high school. We turned 

on the T.V. in third period and 10 minutes 

later the second plane hit. " 



JOF. KiRKPATRICK 

Si NIOR, MaKKI 1 INCi 

"At Lycoming College visiting a friend. 



UlNDSI N Ml KPIIV 

So[>l l( )\U )Kh, El IMl N I ARN 
i;i)Ut Al ION 

"In my high school civics class with 

Mr. Antuano. third row. second seat, 

taking notes." 




September 14. 2006 



Tlffi gjiJUON CALL 



Page 9 



Football falls at Kutztown 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s ekbowser@clarion.edu 

KUTZTOWN. Sept. 9 - The 
Golden Kagles Football 
team dropped their record 
on the young sea.son to ()-2 
with a 27-10 loss at 
Kutztown on Saturday 
night. 

The Golden Eagles 
played solid throughout the 
first half and grabbed an 
early lead on a 22 yard field 
goal by senior Kyle Snoke. 
After falling behind 611 the 
Golden p]agles came back 
and took a 10-6 lead with 
5:35 remaining in the half 
on a 25 yard touchdown 
pass by freshman quarter- 
back Mark Kupert to sopho- 
more Dane Williams. 

Kutztown's Maurice 
Adams then took over the 
next few minutes of the 
game. 

Adams scored on a two- 
yard touchdown run with 



26-.seconds remaining in the 
second quarter. On the 
opening kickoff of the sec- 
ond half, Adams struck 
again returning the kick 85 
yards for a touchdown and 
giving Kutztown a 20-10 
cushion. 

The Golden Eagles 
failed to score the rest of the 
game despite moving the 
ball. 

"We ran the ball well 
and moved good, but didn't 
score enough points," first 
year head coach Jay Foster 
said. Clarion rushed for 1S(5 
yards and outgained 
Kutztown 324-323 in total 
yards. 

"Eddie Emanuel and the 
offensive line are playing 
very well and the passing 
game got better," Foster 
said. 

Emanuel led Clarion 
with 88 rushing yards on 16 
carries. 

Foster said that Rupert 
is improving and needs to 
continue to do so. Rupert 



completed 1 1 of his 38 pass- 
es with one touchdown and 
added eight rushes for 36 
yards. 

"Defensively, our line- 
backers and dim Simmons, 
our defensive tackle, are 
playing well, but we are giv- 
ing up too much through the 
air, too many big plays," 
said Foster. 

"We must stop giving up 
the big plays and create 
some turnovers," Foster 
said, "We have a lot of 
improvement to go yet but 
the players are working 
hard at it." 

The most important thing 
for the Gold(>n Eagles, "We 
have got to score more and 
keep people off the score- 
board." Foster said. 

The Golden Eagles will 
get another chance at their 
first victory of the season 
when they play host to West 
Chester in the home opener 
this Saturday at 6 p.m. 



Ortiz says comments about Jeter 
were taken out of context 



David Heuschkel 
Washington Post 



BALTIMORE - Manny 
Ramirez strategically 

placed a copy of Tuesday's 
New York Post on the floor 
right in front of David 
Ortiz's locker with the back 
page face up. A picture of 
Ortiz and Yankees shortstop 
Derek Jeter was accompa- 
nied with the headline 
"Derek & Goliath." Under 
the photo, it read, 
"Determined David disses 
Jeter MVP talk." 

It was quite obvious 
that Ramirez wanted his 
teammate to see it -- until 
he looked up and noticed a 
reporter had seen it unfold, 
at which point Ramirez 
picked up the newspaper 
and got rid of it. 

Ortiz was upset that his 
comments about the MVP 
race, first published Sunday 
the Boston Globe, in which 
he made the point that 
power hitters are more 
deserving of the MVP than a 
Derek Jeter -- whom he did 
say was having a great year 
-- because they do more for 
their team. 

The Post headline and 
other headlines in New York 
made it seem like Ortiz was 



saying he should win the 
award over the Yankees cap- 
tain. And that, Ortiz said 
Tuesday, could not be fur- 
ther than the truth. 
"Hell no! C'mon. dude. That 
guy is one of my favorite 
players," Ortiz said. "You 
never talk (smack) about 
Derek Jeter, bro. It's wrong. 
That guv plays his (butt) 
off." 

Ortiz said he straight- 
ened out the situation with 
Jeter even though he did not 
speak directly to him. 

"I look like a freaking 
(idiot) out there because 
people haven't heard what I 
said," Ortiz said. "Now I 
talked to a whole bunch of 
people. Now they know my 
side. Especially knowing 
me, I'm not a (smack) talk- 
er." 

Ortiz admitted to being 
upset and said he was both- 
ered the most from "when 
people say things that I 
haven't said. What is out 
there, that they said I 
should be the MVP and all 
that bullcrap." 

Ortiz was taken aback 
by a wire version of the 
story that ran in USA Today 
with a photo of him and cap- 
tion that says he believes he 
should be MVP The New 
York media undoubtedly 
will be waiting for Ortiz and 



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the Red Sox, who play a 
four-game series this week- 
end at Yankee Stadium. 
Ortiz said he is not wor- 
ried. 

"It's all good," Ortiz said. "I 
bring my boys from New 
York, they whoop any- 
body's (butt). I'll be walk- 
ing with them (dudes). ... 
"You want some of this?'" 

Ramirez was not in the 
lineup because his right 
knee was bothering him. 
He has not .started 13 of 
the past 20 games, a 
stretch that began Aug. 22 
in Anaheim. 

"I'm gonna be the 
MVP!" Ramirez said to 
nobody in particular as he 
emerged from a lounge in 
the clubhouse. 

Later on, as the Red 
Sox were stretching before 
batting practice. Orioles 
DH Kevin Millar walked 
over and told Ramirez, 
"You got to play to win the 
MVP." 

All joking aside. 
Manager Terry Francona 
was asked if the team 
would consider shutting 
down Ramirez for the sea- 
son. 

"If we have to." 
Francona said. "I'd rather 
not. I guess we could get to 
a point where the trainers 
say that's the right thing to 
do, but I haven't heard 
them say that yet. I think 
it comes down to what he 
can tolerate." 



Soccer wins pair on the road 



Robert Rankin 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 



CLARION, Sept. 11 - This 
season the Golden Eagles 
.soccer team has jumped out 
to a 4-2 start with a 11 
record in the PSAC West. 

After starting off last 
week with a 3-0 loss at 
California University of 
Pennsylvania, Clarion has 
won its last two games with 
a 2-0 victory at Davis and 
Elkins and a 2-1 win at 
West Virginia Wesleyan. 

In the win at Davis and 
Elkins, sophomore Nicole 
Scott and junior Ashley 
Downs each scored a goal to 
lead the Golden P^agles to 
victory. 



Tn the Golden Eagles 
next victory, it was sopho- 
more Rachael Schmitz and 
senior Ashlie Kegazzi who 
scored in the 2-1 victory 
over West Virginia 
Wesleyan. 

Coach Christina Alonzo 
says that it is the teams 
goalkeeper that has led the 
team, "Our goalkeeper 
Jessica Reed stands out a 
lot. She is a junior this year 
and she shows leadership on 
the team and she plays with 
passion everyday." 

Reed has allowed only 
seven goals in the teams 
first six games of the .season. 

The Golden Eagles hope 
to be in the thick of the con- 
ference throughout the sea- 
son. 



"Our goal for the season 
is to stay in the mix of the 
conference and at least .stay 
in the middle of the stand- 
ings," Alonzo said. 

"We have a very exciting 
team, we have had a very 
smooth preseason and the 
freshman that have came in 
this year are looking really 
good and they have a lot of 
potential." 

Coming up next for the 
Golden Eagles is a home 
date with Slippery Rock 
University on Wednesday 
Sept. 13. 

The Golden Kagles will 
then follow that up with a 
trip to Edinboro University 
on Saturday. 



Peyton victorious in "Tlie IVIanning Bowl" 



Sam Farmer 
Washington Post 

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. 
- They stood side by side, as 
close as their shoulder pads 
would allow. Big brother 
reached over and patted lit- 
tle brother's back, mussed 
his hair, whispered words of 
encouragement in his ear. It 
was a personal, post-game 
moment Sunday night 
between the Mannings, two 
of the NFL's most talked- 
about quarterbacks. 

Just Peyton, Eli and 
mere inches away, a few 
hundred photographers 
behind a sea of camera lens- 
es. 

"I just told him I loved 
him." Peyton said, whose 
Indianapolis Colts beat Eli's 
New York Giants, 26-21, 
before a packed house at 
Giants Stadium. "Told him 1 
was proud of the way he 
competed. I enjoyed watch- 
ing him play in person; he's 
every bit as good as he 
looked on TV to me." 

The Mannings, separat- 
ed by five years and oppos- 
ing NFL conferences, had 
never played football 
against each other at any 
level other than backyard 
games. In fact, this was the 
first time Peyton had ever 
seen Eli play live as a pro. 

The duel lived up to its 
billing. In part, the outcome 
hinged on a questionable 
offensive pass interference 
call on receiver Tim Carter 
that wiped out a big first 
down for the comeback- 
minded Giants. On the next 
play, a third-and-11 from 
the New York 9, Eli made 
one of his few gaffes of the 
game, badly overthrowing 
his receiver with a pass that 
was intercepted. That set up 



the Colts' final score, a 
demoralizing fourth field 
goal by new kicker Adam 
Vinatieri. , 

Giants Coach Tom 
Coughlin. wildly waving his 
arms and bright red in the 
face, screamed at officials 
after the call on Carter. 
Asked about it later, though, 
he chose his words carefully. 

"There's no place for me 
to go talking about penal- 
ties," he said. "I expressed 
myself on the field to the 
officials. It's a shame 
because we got the ball out 
there near midfield. and 
that's where it should have 
been. 1 was standing right 
there. It's very difficult for 
me to think that kind of play 
is a foul." 

After the game, the 
Manning parents stared 
blankly from their perch in 
the Reebok luxury suite 
before gathered their 
belongings and somberly 
shuffling to the door. They 
reconvened in a room in the 
bowels of the stadium to 
dole out hugs to their sons. 
"I'm glad we don't have to go 
through this for a few more 
years," mother Olivia said. 

Then, perking up. she 
added: "I guess I'd take it if 
they managed to get to a 
Super Bowl together. That 
would be all right." 

At times Sunday, both 
teams looked as if they 
could wind up being playoff 
contenders. And both also 
looked flawed. The Colts 
rolled up 272 yards passing 
but seemed to miss Pro 
Bowl running back Edgerrin 
James, now with the 
Arizona Cardinals. 
Their defense could do little 
to stop New York's running 
game, which amassed 186 
yards on the ground, led by 
Tiki Barber's 18 carries for 



no yards. 

"We did a good job 
against a good defense." Eli 
said, who threw two touch- 
down passes to Peyton's one. 
and had an 88.7 passer rat- 
ing to Peyton's 78.9. "We 
had no sacks and ran the 
ball really well, protected 
well and completed some 
good passes and made some 
plays. We just didn't make 
enough." 

As well as Barber 
played, he was merely a 
sideshow. This game was all 
about the Manning broth- 
ers, and was among the 
most eagerly anticipated 
regular season matchups in 
memory. The hype also took 
its toll on the brothers -- and 
some of the people around 
them. 

"I've never been into a 
stadium, outside of when we 
played Kansas City after 
9/11, when they put an 
opposing player on the pro- 
gram," Giants defensive end 
Michael Strahan said, refer- 
ring to the cover featuring 
the Mannings. "Who made 
that decision? ... I found 
that a little offensive." 

Even Colts Coach Tony 
Dungy, while pleased about 
the final score, was eager to 
put the hubbub behind him. 
He said that to some degree 
he could understand 
Peyton's conflicting feelings. 
Dungy felt some of those 
when he returned to play 
Tampa Bay, where he was 
head coach from 1996 
through 2001. 

"I had that same feeling 
... but not of this magni- 
tude." Dungy said. "The 
buildup wore on all of us. 
Now we can concentrate on 
No. 2 without all the fan- 
fare." 



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x2380 or 
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Page 10 



Tffi CLAHION CALL 



September 14. 2006 



Sfirts 



Todaj: Football falls to kut/iown ter wins two on th e road 



Tennis drops opener at St. Vincent 



Chris Parks 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_C8parKsOclarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 12 - The 
Clarion University Women's 
Tennis Team opened up 
their 2006 fall schedule on 
the road playing a familiar 
opponent, the St. Vincent 
College Bearcats. 

Last season, the Golden 
Eagles defeated the 
Bearcats at home 7-2, but 
Sunday afternoon was a dif- 
ferent story as the match 
went back and forth and the 
home team got the best of 
Clarion winning five match- 
es to four. The win gave the 
Bearcats a 3-1 record thus 
far in the fall season. 

Scoring wins in the sin- 
gles matches for Clarion 
were juniors Corin 
Rombach, Amy Robertson 
and Lisa Baumgartner, 
while the tandem of 
Robertson and Baumgar- 
tner also won their doubles 
match. 

Even though the team 
came up a match short to 
kick off the season, senior 
captain Kristen Jack was 
not too worried and thought 
the team did some good 
things. 

"We played hard and 
battled out there. We just 
didn't catch some breaks, 
and it's a shame it came 
down to one game to deter- 




Archlve Photo Fall 2005/ The Clarion Call 

The Clarion University Tennis team started off the season with a 5-4 loss at St. Vincent College. 
This weekend, they travel east for three matches. The Golden Eagles will have their home opener 
on September 19 against Millersville. 



mine the outcome." 

"I know we will get into 
a groove and play some good 
tennis as a team." 

Robertson, the winner of 
both her matches, comment- 
ed on the new look of the St. 
Vincent team and how it 
was a much different team 
than when they met last 
fall. 



"They got a lot of new 
players and got a lot 
stronger as a team. In addi- 
tion to that they played 
three matches before us, 
this was just our first one, 
so we were just trying to get 
a feel and grasp back into 
match action." 

"I'm proud of the way we 
played and hustled out 



there. We have always been 
a good team and contended 
well with our opponents and 
I think you are going to see 
that a lot in the fall." 

The team brings back a 
lot of veteran leadership 
with a host of juniors and 
seniors with a lot of experi- 
ence. 

Rombach has been the 



number one singles player 
for the past two seasons. 
Jack has played two, three, 
and four singles throughout 
her career and Baumgar- 
tner has risen to being the 
number two singles player 
this season and her game 
continues to get better with 
each match. 

Some freshmen are also 
getting in the action, 
Brittany Bovalino was 
teamed with junior Megan 
Robertson as doubles part- 
ners for the match and they 
played well, losing their 
game only 8 to 5. 

Bovalino was the num- 
ber six singles player in the 
match and, being a fresh- 
man that is a good start to a 
young career. 

The Golden Eagles will 
continue to stay on the road 
before returning home for 
their first home match of 
the fall against Millersville. 

Coming up this week- 
end on Sept. 15 and 16, they 
travel to PSAC East rivals 
West Chester and Kutztown 
respectively. 

Then they are back at it 
again at Kutztown on Sept. 
17, against the University 
of the Sciences of Philad- 
elphia for the last of a three 
day, three match road trip 
for the ladies on the first of 
a couple of Eastern PA trips 
this season. The Golden 
Eagles will have their home 
opener on Sept. 19 against 
Millersville. 



Sports Britfe 




Sports briefs courtesy of 
Sports Information 



Fries Named PSAC- 
West Player of the 
Week for Sept 10 




Golf Team finishes sixth at Ohio Valley Invitational 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s ekbowser@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 9 - The 
Clarion University Golf 
team opened its season this 
past weekend with a sixth 
place finish in the 18 team 
Ohio Valley Invitational 
held at Woodridge Golf Club 
in Vienna, W.Va. 

Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania finished first 
overall in the event with a 



total team score of 575 (-^7). 
Clarion shot a 601 (-t-33) in 
the two-day event. 

Justin Moose followed 
up his first day 75 with a 72 
to finish at 5-over-par for 
the tournament. Moose, the 
reigning PSAC champion, 
was the low man for the 
Golden Eagles and finished 
16th overall. Tom Will fin- 
ished in a tie for 25th with a 
76 and a 73 respectively. 

The team expected bet- 
ter than a sixth place finish 
and felt they should have 



had a better performance 
last week. "We were all dis- 
appointed," Coach Al 
Lefevre said. 

The Golden Eagles still 
are optimistic for the rest of 
the season. "We want to 
repeat as PSAC Champions 
and want to win the East 
Regionals and go to nation- 
als," Lefevre said. "Overall 
we are looking for a good 
year from the team as a 
whole and anything that 
anyone can give us individu- 
ally will help out the team." 



Last season, the Golden 
Eagles finished second in 
the East Regionals, just six 
strokes away from a trip to 
nationals. This year's team 
returns every member from 
last season including five 
seniors Mike Bancroft, Eric 
Kalbfleisch, Justin Scott, 
Zach Szwast and Tom Will. 

Up next for the Golden 
Eagles is their only home 
meet of the fall season, the 
Hal Hansen, which will be 
held at Clarion Oaks Golf 
Course on Sunday and 



Monday. The Hal Hansen 
will be the only home event 
for the team on their fall 
schedule. 

Play will start at 10 a.m. 
on Sunday and resume with 
a shotgun start at 9 a.m. on 
Monday. 

Scott, Will, and Moose 
will be the top three starters 
for Clarion, while Preston 
Mullens, Nick Brucker and 
Mike DeAngelo will have a 
playoff to determine the 
final two starters for the 
event. 



Sarah Fries 
Player of the week 

Clarion University 
junior Sarah Fries is the 
PSAC-West Women's 
Volleyball Player of the 
Week for the week end- 
ing with games Sept. 10. 

Fries helped lead 
Clarion to a 3-0 week by 
recording 38 kills (3.8 per 
game) and 32 digs (3.2 
per game) as the Golden 
Eagles went 3-0 at West 
Chester's Ramfest. 

She also had a .400 
hitting percentage. Her 
best match, at Ramfest, 
was in a 3-1 win over 
Ohio Valley Friday when 
she posted 17 kills and 
eight digs. 

She also had 12 kills 
and nine digs in a 3*0 
win over Goldey-Beacom 
Saturday. 

On the season, Fries 
has helped Clarion to a 7- 
1 • start going into 
Tuesday's PSACWest 
opener at California. 

She leads the team in 
kills (81) while adding 83 
digs and 13 service aces. 

Fries is the first 
Clarion player to be 
named Player of the 
Week since Sara Heyl 
garnered the award Nov. 
3, 2004. 




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INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393- 1 667 



Intramural Schedule 



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9/M/06 

Delta Zeta Pitts Forfeit 

Priceless Off in Shower 25-23,25-15 

Sunglasses The Contenders 25-7, 25-20 

5K Race 

Sponsored by the United Way 

Saturday, 9/30 Race starts 9am 

Intramurals will reimburse half of the 
entry fee for CUP students. Stop by the 
Rec Center for entry forms. 

Ultimate Frisbee, Golf and Tennif 
Stay tuned for details... 



Dodgeball Reiulti 

9111106 

The n.W.o 



Dynasty 
Trash Monkeys 
Ave. Joe's Gym 
Delta Zeta 



Satan's Little Helpers 
The Pitts Forfeit 

BigBois 
Team Ramrod 
Rtts 




/fitramcirarsofi the Web 
clarion.edu/lntraiTiurals 

Or from die CUP home page: 
elielc on Athletiet then Intramurab. 

Find out details about every sport including 
rules, roster limitations, schedules and 
results. See your team in action with new 

pictures posted every week. 

''REGiSTER ON-UNE*' 
E-Mail questions / comments 




^ "Rocic Your Junl< Tour" 

See "Entertainment" page 7 



Clarion hosts Hip-Hop symposium- 

See "News" page 2 




Country stars rocic 
CampusFest 



See "Features" page 5 



One copy free 




ECL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 





Volume 93 Issue 2 



September 21, 2006 




Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

NFL players association 
may restrict agents 

WASHINGTON - The 
NFL Players Association 
is considering tightening 
its rules governing con- 
tact between agents and 
college players in the 
wake of reports that 
Heisman Trophy winning 
running back Reggie 
Bush received improper 
financial benefits from 
marketing representa- 
tives while he was at the 
University of Southern 
California. 

Gene Upshaw, execu- 
tive director of the union, 
said he plans to propose a 
rule that would prohibit 
agents from contacting 
players until after they 
have declared themselves 
eligible for the NFL draft. 

FCC wireless auction 
could open up airwaves 

WASHINGTON 
Cellphone customers 
should soon encounter 
fewer dead spots in their 
coverage areas and more 
easily use next-genera- 
tion phones that play tel- 
evision-quality video and 
perform other high-tech 
tricks, thanks to a 
Federal Communications 
Commission spectrum 
auction that concluded 
Monday. 

More than 100 bid- 
ders - including cell- 
phone giants T-Mobile 
USA Inc. and Verizon 
Wireless"have promised 
to pay a total of $13.9 bil- 
lion to the U.S. Treasury 
for chunks of the air- 
waves no longer used by 
the federal government. 
It is the largest amount of 
radio spectrum ever sold 
at once. 

Iraq troop levels to 
remain constant 

WASHINGTON - U.S. 
troop levels in Iraq will 
likely remain at the cur- 
rent number - more than 
140,000 - through next 
spring, the senior U.S. 
commander in the Middle 
East said Tuesday. 

Gen. John Abizaid, 
commander of the U.S. 
Central Command, said 
current troops levels are 
needed because of the 
sectarian violence in Iraq, 
problems with the coun- 
try's police force, and the 
slow progress that has 
been mad'e in establish- 
ing an Iraqi government. 



Vatican moves to 
contain Muslim anger 

ROME - The Vatican 
deployed diplomats to 
capitals of Muslim states 
Monday in an effort to 
contain anger over Pope 
Benedict XVI's comments 
on Islam, as shadowy 
threats against the pon- 
tiff and Christianity mul- 
tiplied. 



CUP requests campus police at Relnhard 



Krystal Finkbeiner 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_knfinl< bein@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 20 - 
Clarion University put forth 
a request stating that Public 
Safety would be allowed to 
patrol and control Reinhard 
Villages, although off-cam- 
pus housing and Clarion 
Township supervisors are 
considering the change. 

Michael Keefer of 
Clarion University 

Foundation, which owns the 
Reinhard Villages and 
David Tedjeske, Clarion's 
Director of Public Safety are 
trying to collaborate to pass 
the right for Public safety to 
enforce law at Reinhard 
Villages. 

"It was always our 
desire to work with public 
safety- logistics just got in 
the way" said Keefer. 

"There was a law 
change commonly known as 
Act 48 of 2003, amended 
Title 24, Section 20-2019-A, 
giving permission to all 
state universities to exercise 
concurrently those powers 
and perform those duties 
conferred pursuant to a 
cooperative police service 
agreement in accordance 
with 42 Pa.," said Tedjeske. 

Essentially, this legal 
change allows public safety 
to enter an agreement with 
a local municipality (Clarion 
Township) where public 




Reinhard Wages - Efforts are 
Reinhard Villages. 

safety can assume primary 
jurisdiction off-campus. 

"To have primary juris- 
diction means that public 
safety would conduct rou- 
tine patrol and would be the 
department dispatched to 
any police call in that area. 
This is different than going 
off campus to assist another 
department," Tedjeske said. 

Even without an agree- 
ment, the campus police are 
allowed to go off campus to 
assist any local, state or fed- 
eral law enforcement that is 
required. 

"Prior to this law change 
we would not have been able 
to patrol Reinhard Villages 



Jenifer Bovlete/Tfie Clarion Call 

being made to pass the right for public saftey to enforce law at 



since it is off-campus hous- 
ing," explained David 
Tedjeske. 

According to Tedjeske 
there are two functions for 
public safety being at 
Reinhard. 

"Security purposes and 
police responding to calls, 
the security structure will 
have different hours as well, 
essentially they will be 
there 24 hours, seven days a 
week." 

The villages are tightly 
secured, maintaining a staff 
of six hired professionals, 
three graduate students and 
community assistants. This 
extra security will not affect 



the students living expens- 
es. 

"There will not be a 
change in cost based on the 
fact that public safety is 
paid for through the 
University," said Keefer. 

The Villages are able to 
hold up to 656 residents and 
according to Keefer, and all 
but six rooms are occupied. 

Katie Miller, a first year 
community assistant and 
sophomore agrees that pub- 
lic safety would be a great 
asset to Reinhard. 

"Community assistants 
are an important asset to 
the complex because we are 
able to control the area. 



however, there have been 
times when higher authori- 
ty needs to be step in," said 
Miller. 

"If pubic safety is there 
to respond to those calls, 
action will be taken sooner 
and many conflicts could be 
avoided." 

According to Keefer, the 
process and behavior at 
Reinhard is running 
smoothly and the communi- 
ty assistants are very effec- 
tive. 

"Having Public Safety 
would benefit the residents 
immensely," said Miller. 
"With public safety our staff 
can assure parents their 
children will be safe." 

According to both Keefer 
and Tedjeske, the purpose 
for letting public safety 
intervene with Reinhard 
has nothing to do with high 
crime or serious problems 
with being out of control. 

'The foundation which 
owns Reinhard Villages is a 
designated receiver of gifts, 
a non-profit organization 
which is affiliated and sup- 
ports the University," 
Keefer said. 

Tedjeske also said that 
as of now it is not a done 
deal. 

Tedjeske said, 'This is a 
day by day process, there 
are still some things to be 
worked out by Clarion town- 
ship." 



LIngwali to lead 
PR ethics panel 



Adam Mohney 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ajmohney@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 20 - Dr. 
Andrew Lingwall, an assis- 
tant professor of 
Communication at CUP, will 
be leading a panel discus- 
sion for the Public Relations 
Society of America (PRSA) 
at Point Park University in 
Pittsburgh, Pa., on Sept. 22. 

The panel discussion, 
which is geared toward pro- 
fessionals and future profes- 
sional of the public relations 
(PR) field, will be titled, 
"The Ethics of Being 
Genuine: How Well Are We 
Doing?" 

"We're going to talk 
about some of the key things 
that were big in the news 
last year pertaining to ethi- 
cal practices in the public 
relations field," said 
Lingwall, the 2006-2007 
Ethics Committee 

Chairperson for the PRSA 
Pittsburgh chapter. 

"We're also going to 
cover information on ethical 
violations PR professionals 
are often accused of like 
front groups, fake news and 
video news. Hopefully peo- 
ple will be able to take the 
information they gather 
back to their jobs or to their 
future jobs and know what 
to look for," Lingwall said. 

He emphasized the 
importance of students 
thinking about entering the 
PR field attending the 
event. "I want students to 
know PR isn't just about 
spinning a story the right 
way, making somebody feel 



good or covering up bad eth- 
ical behavior, and that it 
really can be an ethical pro- 
fession that someone would 
want to be in and feel, good 
about," Lingwall said. 

"I also want students to 
spot possible trouble areas 
for ethics and know what to 
look for and what to do if 
they ever get asked to do 
something unethical, by 
industry standards, in their 
jobs," Lingwall said. 

The event is meant to 
question the industry's prac- 
tices in current times. 

"We have to step back 
and ask ourselves if we are 
really worried about the two 
way intersection of public 
interest and organizational 
interests," Lingwall said. 

The seminar will fea- 
ture three panelists who 
will take questions from 
professionals and students 
relating to ethical practice 
in the PR field. 

"The panelists were cho- 
sen through personal con- 
nections from people 
involved with PRSA 
Pittsburgh," Lingwall said. 

The panelists will be 
Bryan lams, Dennis Roddy, 
and Madelyn Ross. All of the 
panelists have extensive 
backgrounds in the 
Pittsburgh media. 

Bryan lams is a director 
for Burson-Marsteller's 
Pittsburgh office. He has 
also spent time with the 
Bayer Corporation's corpo- 
rate communications group. 



See "PR PANEL" 
continued on page 2. 



Serial bank robber 
strikes Clarion County 



Lindsay Grystar 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Chief 

sJlgrystar@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 15 - The 
search continues for the 
alleged serial robber want- 
ed for the robbery at the 
Clarion County 

Community Bank on 
Friday, Sept. 15. 

The suspect has also 
been identified as a sus- 
pect who has held up as 
many as seven banks 
throughout Pennsylvania 
over the past year. 

The connection 

between the Clarion rob- 
bery and the other banks 
was based on surveillance 
footage taken from each 
bank. 

The incident at 333 
Main St. happened at 
about 10^45 a.m. 
Clarion County Sheriff 
William Peck was on the 
scene, along with state 
police investigators. 

The suspect has been 
described as a white male 
in his mid 30's, and wore a 
plaid flannel shirt and 
sunglasses. The suspect is 
around 5 feet 10 inches 
tall, and police were told 
he got into a white vehicle, 
Peck said. 

The prosecution of the 
individual will have to be 
handled through the FBI 
in Pittsburgh, because the 
case involves multiple 
jurisdictions. 

The suspect also said 
he had a weapon, but one 
was not visible. No one 



was injured in the robbery. 

The suspect fled with 
an undisclosed amount of 
money and should be con- 
sidered armed and danger- 
ous. 

Photos of the suspect 



at 



can be found 
www.bankguys.us. 

Anyone with informa- 
tion is asked to contact the 
local police. 




Shasta Hartz/The Clarion Call 
Clarion County Community Bank - Police investigated the 
scene of the Clarion County Community Bank at 333 Main St. 
after the robbery on Friday, Sept. 15. 




Shasta Kurt^TTie Clarion Call 
Bank robbery - The Clarion County Community Bank is locat- 
ed at 333 Main St., in Clarion, Pa. 



Page 2 



T« CLARION CALL 



September 21. 2006 



Im 



CUP to host Hip-Hop symposium 



Natalie Kennell 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_nekennell®clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 14 - On 
Oct. 18, Clarion University 
will host the first Hip- Hop 
symposium in the Gemmell 
Student Center. 

Hip-Hop: The Politics of 
Morality symposium is the 
vision of Dr. Joanne 
Washington and Dr. Michael 
Torres, both communication 
professors at Clarion 
University. 

Washington said the 
symposium is about, 
"Exploring media as a com- 
municator of HipHop cul- 
ture, economics, and identi- 
ty formation with an 
emphasis on youth and 
mainstream middle and 
working class family val- 
ues." 

Three sessions will 
divide the speakers and 
activities. Session one will 
run from 10 a.m. until 11:30 
a.m. Hip-Hop, I AM a 
Cultural and Economic 
Explosion, will feature 
Bakari Kitwana, author, lec- 
turer and co-founder of 
National Hip-Hop Political 
Convention; Lisa Ellis, 
President of Sony Urban 
Music; John Esposito, 



President and CEO, 
WEA/Warner Music Group 
and former general manag- 
er of Island Def Jam Music 
Group; Royland Fryer, 
Professor in the Department 
of Economics, Harvard 



Identity and Moral Choices, 
will consist of Bakari 
Kitwana; Michael Geer, 
President of Pennsylvania 
Family Institute; Ronald 
Jackson, a professor in the 
Department of 




Shasta Kurti/The Clarion Call 
HIp-Hop symposium - CUP will host symposium on Sept. 22. in 
the Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room. 



Society of Fellows, Harvard 
University; and Marcyliena 
Morgan, a Professor in the 
Department of 

Communication at Stanford 
and Founder and Director of 
the Hip-Hop Archives of 
Stanford University. 

Session two will /un 
from 2 p.m. until 3:yO p.m. 
Hip-Hop: I AM Image, 



Communication at 

Pennsylvania State 

University and author of 
Negotiating the Black Body 
Intersections of Identity, 
Culture and 

Communication, Akiba 
Soloman, Senior Editor of 
Vibe Vixen Magazine; and 
Karen Stevenson, M.D., 
Board Certified 



Psychiatrist, Lewisburg 
Hospital. 

Session three will begin 
at 7 p.m. and continue until 
8:30 p.m. Hip-Hop I AM 
Media Influence and the 
Voice of Hip-Hop will 
include Jeff Johnson, politi- 
cal expert, host of The Jeff 
Johnson Chronicles on 
Black Entertainment 

Television, and nationally 
recognized Hip- Hop Artist. 

The panel of speakers is 
not the only attraction, how- 
ever. Throughout the day 
there will be an art show 
exhibition, a performance by 
the Hip-Hop dance team, 
and possibly a performance 
by some of the guests. 

A grant has been issued 
in the effort to include Hip- 
Hop into curriculum for cer- 
tain classes. 

College students are 
able to gain co-curricular 
credit for volunteering at 
the symposium which will 
appear on their transcript. 

Torres said, "This is a 
great opportunity to be 
involved in something fresh 
and new. It's ideal to make 
contacts with all sorts of 
people. It allows students to 
grow and be challenged." 



Scholar awards sponsored by Provosts office 



Heather Webster 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Sept. 20 - The 
Provost's office is now 
accepting applications at 
115 Carrier Hall, until Oct. 
31, for the Undergraduate 
and International Scholar 
Awards. 

This is the second year 
for the awards program at 
Clarion University. Last 
year, nine International 
awards were given and four 
Undergraduate research 
projects were funded. 

The scholarships help 
students with such projects 
as: "The Multi-Drug 
Resistance Gene: Detection 
of Mutant Alleles in 
Purebred Collies and 
AustraUan Shepard Dogs;" 
"Furthering the 

Development of Artificial 
Intelligence in Flash;" and 
"National Council on 
Education for the Ceramic 
Arts Exhibition." 

Students were helped in 
the funding for trips to the 
United Kingdom, Belgium, 
France, Switzerland, 

Germany and the 



Netherlands. Jennifer 

Chamberlin, winner of one 
of last years International 
Scholar Awards said, "The 
scholarship has helped pay 
some of the cost of going 
over to Germany. If you are 
planning on going abroad 
then it's worth doing it." 

International Scholar 
awards up to $2,000 and is 
available to full time sopho- 
more, junior or senior. 
Clarion or Venango students 
who plan to study abroad. 
The money is intended to 
help with travel, room and 
board, supplies and tuition. 

Dr. Linda Nolan, 
Provost and Academic Vice 
President, said, "I believe 
that it is extremely impor- 
tant for students to experi- 
ence first hand a different 
culture and political system 
than the one in which they 
are familiar. Study abroad 
provides different perspec- 
tives and allows one to 
reflect and compare and 
therefore grow as an indi- 
vidual and citizen of the 
world." 

The Undergraduate 
Scholar awards of up to 
$1,000 are available to full- 



time junior and senior 
Clarion and Venango stu- 
dents. The awards are to 
provide student with the 
opportunities to work with 
faculty on research and 
scholarly activities in their 
area of study. 

Nolan said, "This oppor- 
tunity provides the student 
with a faculty mentor and 
hands on experience which 
will be great to assist to 
them in entering the work 
force or applying to gradu- 
ate or professional school." 

The awards are given in 
the categories of Civic, 
Renaissance and 

Collaborative Research pro- 
grams. 

The Civic Scholars 
Program awards students 
who propose projects on 
civic engagement. This 
includes any community 
service project that directly 
affects the Clarion and 
Venango campuses or coun- 
ties. 

The Renaissance 

Scholars Program awards 
students who have interest 
and expertise in more than 
one academic discipline. The 
award is used for a project 



that combines work from 
their major and other disci- 
plines. 

The Collaborative 

Research Scholars Program 
awards students who are 
engaged in collaborative 
research in their area of 
study. This work should be 
part of a larger project 
developed with a faculty 
member and be exhibitable, 
performable, or publishable 
in a journal. 

All scholars will be 
required to present their 
work at an Undergraduate 
conference on April 20, 
2007. Applicants must have 
a minimum QPA of 2.8. 

A selection committee, 
chosen by the Provost, will 
select the recipients of the 
awards. Their choices will 
be based on merit, feasibili- 
ty and organization of the 
project. 

Also, the applicant's 
training, credentials and 
expertise to accomplish the 
proposed activity, and dedi- 
cation of the student to the 
project will determine the 
selection. 



"PR PANEL" contin- 
ued from front page 

Some of his PR strate- 
gies have been used by 
Accenture, Major League 
Baseball, PPG, Pittsburgh 
Paints, Strategic Energy, 
and Timken, according to 
his biography. 

Dennis Roddy has been 
involved in the newspaper 
business for nearly 30 years. 
He is an award winning 
journalist for the 

Pittsburgh-Post Gazette. In 
2000, Roddy was named top 
columnist by the Scripps 
Howard Foundation, accord- 
ing to his biography. 

Madelyn A. Ross was 
managing editor for the 
Pittsburgh Press until it 
was merged with the Post- 
Gazette and she became 
their managing editor. She 
has been involved with 
three Pulitzer Prize winning 
projects throughout her edi- 
torial career. Ross also 
helped the PostGazette in 



being named best paper in according to Lingwall. 

the state six years in a row, "People are free to ask their 

according to her biography. own questions to the pan- 

The panel is set up in an elists, who 1 hope can pro- 

,vide some clear lines 
labout what's okay 
land what's not okay 
I in today's industry," 
|he said. 

The attendance 
Iratio for students 
land professionals is 
labout one to one, 
[according to 

iLingwall. The 

I Clarion chapter will 
Ihave students there, 
las well as several 
lother campuses 

[throughout the area. 
IPublic relations pro- 
Ifessionals attending 
Ithe event are mostly 
linvolved with non- 
profit organizations 
or corporate agen- 
cies in the greater 
Pittsburgh area, 
Lingwall said. Last 
year approximately 
members of the PRSA 




Brittnee Koebler/The Clarion Call 

Lingwall to lead panel - PR panel dis- 
cussion on ethics will be held in 
Pittsburgh, Pa. on Sept. 22. 



and PRSSA attended the 
discussion. 

The seminar is held in 
September of every year 
because it is PRSA's Ethics 
month, but Lingwall hopes 
ethics can always be impor- 
tant to pr. "I hope ethics are 
something that get thought 
about and practiced year 
round," Lingwall said. 

Lingwall has an exten- 
sive background in PRSA. 
He has been involved with 
the organization since 1992, 
when he became a profes- 
sional PR practitioner. He is 
currently the Ethics 
Chairperson for the organi- 
zation's Pittsburgh chapter. 
"My duty is to monitor and 
serve as an informational 
resource for the members of 
the PRSA Pittsburgh, and to 
deal with ethical issues," 
Lingwall said. 




The Clarion Call provides a aynopsia of aU criminal 
investigations as (wnducted by the Clarion University 
Public Safety for the month of September 2(K)6. 
All iofermatk>n can be accessed on the Public Safety 
Web page. 

■ Joseph Davis, 19, of Melrose Park, Pa., was dted for 
underage (M^nsumption on Sept. 13, at i:36 a.m. in Nair 
Hall. Police were dispatched initially to investigate a 
noise complaint. 

■ Ronald Haywood, 23, of Shaipsville, Pa., was charged 
with 2 counts of DUI and several traffic violations from 
a traffic stop on Sept. 8. on Wood St. Haywood was 
observed driving in the wrong lane of the roadway and 
almost striking a police vehicle. Haywood was trans' 
ported to Clarion Hospital for blood work and the 
results did show positive for alcohol in system. 

■ Sept. 11, at 12:47 a.m.,Umver8ity Police were called 
to Nair Hall concerning an incident in which, an indi- 
vidual threw water out of the window on the fourth 
floor of Nair Hall, striking an individual. 

■ Bradley Hoffman, 24, of Saylorsbui^i, Pa., was 
charged with a DUI and other code aolations when he 
drove through a red Ught at the intersection of 8th Ave. 
and Wood St. 

■ Michael Alonzo, 19, was stopped by police on Sept. 3, 
behind the recreation center, when he drove through a 
"Do Not Entei^' area. Alonzo was found to be under the 
iirfluence of alcohol and was charged with a DUI, 
underage consumption, and other vehicle violations. M 

m Sept. 8, at 1-39 a.m., a known individual was travel- 
ing east on Wood St. when he almost struck a police 
vehicle that was traveling westbound. The driver was 
found to be intoxicated and placed under arrest for 
DUI. Charges are pending blood results. 

■ David Guido, 21, was cited for pubUc drunkenness on 
Sept. 7 at 2'20 a.m. m 



m Sept. 7, at 9=07 p.m., at Wilkinson Hall, University 
Police began investigating a report of drug activity. 

H Sept. 6, at 4:10 p,m„ University PoUce were called to 
investigate the report of a theft of a computer from the 
Haskell House. 




Sunday September 24th 

Clarion University 
Gemmell Multi - Purpose Room 

Dooisopen@6pni 

J5 Door cost 

I 12 for CU students (with ID) 



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THE Calm Before 

FEBRUARY FALLING 



interactive environment, 40 



FOOD 

for body and soul 
every Sunday 

10:15 a.m. Brunch discussion 
11:00 a.m. Worship 

tradition + freedom 
true community 

Clarion Free Methodist Church 
Comer of South St & Third Ave. 

www.clarionfmc.org 



September 21. 2006 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 3 




CUP celebrates 2ncl annual Constitution Day 



Kelly Pennisi 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s.,kpennisiCclarion.edu 

Clarion University will 
participate in the second 
annual Constitution Day on 
Sept. 22, beginning at 9 
a.m. in the Gemmell Multi- 
Purpose room. 

A multi- media presenta- 
tion will be given by associ- 
ate professor of history and 
chair of the Consitution Day 



Activities, Dr. Todd 
Pfannestiel, entitled "Yangs, 
Coms, and Imagining the 
Enemy: The Constitution in 
American Popular Culture." 
Pfannestiel will discuss 
students' knowledge con- 
cerning the Constitution 
and what they already 
know. The two main sources 
of information come from 
movies and television. 
Examples come from movies 
such as "Star Trek," and tel- 



evision shows such as, "Law 
and Order." 

Pfannestiel said, 

"Popular culture introduces 
the Constitution to people in 
ways other than reading 
history books." 

The second event, 'The 
Constitution Challenge," is 
a trivia contest in which 
teams of students play 
against each other in a test 
of historical knowledge. 
This event is specifically for 



local area high school 
students. 

Twenty -five high school 
students have been asksd to 
participate in this special 
leadership workshop. 

The third and final 
event, "Peer Democracy: 
Achieving Students Rights 
Through Student 

Leadership," is an interac- 
tive investigative activity. 

In addition, the Carlson 
Library will have oversized 



copies of the U.S. 
Conctitution on display and 
individuals can sign the 
Constitution. 

Throughout the week, sur- 
veys from the National 
Constitution Center will be 
handed out by the faculty to 
their classes. 

Two years ago, a federal 
law was passed by U.S. 
Congress that required all 
pubhc funded schools to cel- 
ebrate Constitution Day. 



"Congress wants to 
ensure the education of our 
students or of students 
regarding democracy and 
American history," said 
Pfannestiel. 

Last year was the first 
celebration held at Clarion 
University. 

This year will be the 

219th Constitution 

Anniversary. 



Firms vie to provide the future of border security 



Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

If Northrop Grumman 
Corp. gets the multibillion- 
dollar contract to secure 
American borders, the sky 
above the Rio Grande would 
be thick with drones. 

Cell phone maker 
Ericsson Inc. thinks drones 
are largely a waste and 
would focus instead on giv- 
ing Border Patrol agents 
wireless devices capable of 
receiving live video. 

Boeing Co. would line 
the borders with 1,800 high- 
tech towers. 

For Lockheed Martin 
Corp., blimps are a big part 
of the solution. And for 
Raytheon Co., the key is let- 
ting agents watch incidents 
unfold on Google Earth. 

Those are the plans, 
anyway. The questions now 
are which company will win 
the rights to put its technol- 
ogy into play, and how well 
any of it will actually work 
in helping the United States 
gain control of its notorious- 
ly porous borders. 

The Department of 
Homeland Security is 
expected within days to 
name a winner in a competi- 
tion that could permanently 
change the way the United 
States conducts surveil- 
lance, apprehension and 
detention operations along 
its northern and southern 
boundaries. The choice 
promises to lend significant 
insight into how the govern- 
ment sees the future of bor- 
der security, with firms 
offering rival visions of how 
that future looks. 

All year, the nation's 
largest military contractors 
have been locked in intense 
competition to team with 
the government on a pro- 
gram that gives the private 
sector unusually wide sway 
over a critical national secu- 



rity issue. Michael Jackson, 
deputy director of the 
Homeland Security 

Department, told the com- 
peting firms earlier this 
year he wanted them "to 
come back and tell us how to 
do our business." 

The resulting proposals 
are the latest incarnation of 
decades' worth of attempts 
to use technology to create a 
virtual fence. So far, none 
have succeeded. Recent ini- 
tiatives have ended with 
cameras that failed to work 
in extreme temperatures 
and millions of dollars wast- 
ed. 

But with immigration 
legislation stalled in 
Congress, Homeland 

Security officials are gam- 
bling that this new effort - 
known as the Secure Border 
Initiative-will be their best 
hope of cutting the flow of 
illegal immigrants into the 
country. 

Officials say they expect 
the solution to be in place 
within four years! compa- 
nies say they can get it done 
sooner. The cost has been 
pegged at $2 billion but is 
likely to be higher. No one is 
downplaying the stakes. 

"I don't think the 
Department of Homeland 
Security can afford to fail 
here," said Wayne Esser, 
who has led Boeing's efforts 
to capture the contract, 
which is called SBInet. 

"This thing is so politi- 
cally charged. It's very visi- 
ble," Esser said. 

The program has 
already garnered heavy crit- 
icism from detractors who 
worry that the government 
does not know enough about 
what it is buying and that 
the program could amount 
to a costly giveaway to the 
private sector. 

"It's a little bit scary 
when the government 
throws up its hands and 
says, 'We have no idea how 



to do this,"' said Deborah 
Meyers, senior policy ana- 
lyst at the Migration Policy 
Institute. "It just seems like 
the government is putting 
policy in the hands of the 
contractors." 

Homeland Security offi- 
cials say they decided to 
contract out the job because 
they did not have the capac- 
ity to do it in-house. 

They maintain that they 
will ultimately call the 
shots. 

"I don't want any mis- 
take about who is working 
for who," Gregory Giddens, 
director of the Secure 
Border Initiative, told 
Congress on Wednesday. 
The contractor "is working 
for the United States gov- 
ernment." 

The decision of which 
contractor to choose is due 
by the end of the month and 
is expected as soon as this 
week. While the competing 
proposals are similar in 
their basic outlines, they 
differ markedly in the 
details. 

All companies, for 
instance, offer an array of 
sensors, including infrared, 
motion and seismic. But 
they are divided over where 
to place them- -whether to 
bury them, mount them on 
towers, or send them air- 
borne attached to planes, 
helicopters or unmanned 
aerial vehicles. 

Overall, the proposals 
lean heavily on technology 
developed for the battlefield. 

"We're transferring 
things that are military 
into a civil implementation," 
said Bruce Walker, a 
Northrop Grumman vice 
president who has led the 
California company's 

efforts. 

Walker touted the firm's 
fleet of UAVs, which 
includes both the Global 
Hawk - a plane that soars 
high to cover large areas - 



and the KillerBee, a small, 
low-altitude vehicle that can 
be used for more-focused 
missions. 

Both vehicles, he said, 
have sensors with intelli- 
gence capabilities that allow 
them to differentiate 
between false alarms and 
genuine threats. "It may be 
a herd of antelope moving 
across the border, and you 
certainly don't want to send 
.1 team after that," Walker 
said. 

Swedish cell phone 
maker Ericsson is position- 
ing itself as the nonmilitary 



enough. They can't fly in 
bad weather," Smith said. 
"We don't need a Star Wars- 
type solution here. We need 
something that will work." 

Boeing's Esser said his 
team came to a similar con- 
clusion. "UAVs are incredi- 
bly expensive to operate," 
said Esser, citing the size of 
the vehicles ground-based 
crews. "Everybody's real hot 
on UAVs. But you just can't 
afford it. It doesn't make 
sense." 

Instead, the Chicago 
aerospace company has pro- 
posed lining the borders 




Lm kngalaa T liww W wh lngton Post N«ws Service 
Border Patrol - The Department of Homeland Security will 
Change the way the U.S. conducts surveilance. 



solution. Doug Smith, vice 
president for government 
solutions, said border secu- 
rity comes down to "a big, 
broadband wireless prob- 
lem" and that the most 
important challenge is to 
ensure agents have access to 
communications and timely 
information. 

Ericsson's plan involves 
giving every Border Patrol 
agent a personal digital 
assistant similar to models 
available on the commercial 
market. Tall towers lining 
the border would fend off 
dead zones and provide 
much of the surveillance 
data. 

The role of UAVs is min- 
imal. "UAVs aren't reliable 



with a network of towers, 80 
to 200 feet tall. UAVs would 
have a more limited role, 
with agents deploying 
miniature versions of the 
vehicles off the back of their 
trucks. 

The final two compa- 
nies, Lockheed Martin and 
Raytheon, say they provide 
a balance of air- and ground- 
based equipment. 

The solution at 
Ijockheed, the country's 
largest defense contractor, 
includes a UAV that can be 
launched by an individual 
agent, much like a paper 
airplane, as well as larger 
Predator drones and teth- 
ered balloons known as 
aerostats. On the ground, 



the company offers a selec- 
tion of towers - some fixed, 
some mobile. 

Raytheon developed its 
solution based on a compa- 
ny-managed program to 
keep drug-runners and 
poachers out of the Amazon^ 
Border Patrol agents would 
be able to watch sensor 
activity and video feeds 
from their trucks on a dis- 
play based on the satellite- 
powered mapping system 
Google Earth, giving them 
perspectives on border 
issues near and far. The 
company would also provide 
bar-coded bracelets that 
could be used to track sus- 
pects as they move through 
the detention system. 

Like the other firms, 
Raytheon has proposed that 
contractors take over jobs 
now performed by Border 
Patrol agents - such as 
transporting prisoners and 
mending fences - to give 
agents more time to focus on 
their main priority. "We 
would leave the work of the 
Border Patrol to the Border 
Patrol," said Frank 
Marcinkus, Ras^theons 

SBInet capture manager. 

Outside observers say 
freeing up agents time could 
prove critical to the pro- 
gram's overall success. 
Additional technology will 
give agents more data, but 
won't on its own help stop 
the flow of people, said John 
Pike, director of 

GlobalSecurity.org. 

"It doesn't matter how 
much money you spend on 
the siensors," Pike said. "If 
you don't spend a commen- 
surate amount to put agents 
in Humvees to go out and 
catch suspects, it won't 
make a bit of difference. All 
you'll do is get a better sense 
of how they're coming in." 




Jon Mracko 

Freshman, Music Education 
"Penn State." 




Jenifer Poblete 



"Who is your 
favorite college 
football team?" 




Steven Fabian 

Freshman, Music Education 
"Ohio State." 






Josh Seybert 

Sophomore, Communication 
"FSU Seminols." 



Brian Maul 

Junior, Theater 
"York College, I know." 



Courtney Smith 

Senior, Elem. Ed./Library Science 
"Notre Dame." 



Alicia Gallucci 

Freshman, Music Education 
"Ohio State." 




Page 4 



im CLARION CALL 



September 21. 2006 



IfiMM 



Pulling the Digital Plug 




Shasta Kurtz 

Photos & Graphics Editor 

s_sdkiirtz®clarion.edu 

If you are like most col- 
lege kids on this campus, 
you have got a vast array of 
electronics hiding out in 
your backpack or pockets. It 
is not unusual for people to 
have cell phones with net 
access or mp3 players 
almost as thin as a credit 
card - all with more giga- 
bytes than laptops from the 
late 90s. As we walk to 
classes, we've usually got 
headphones in with our 
thumbs punching out anoth- 
er string of text messages. 
We're always plugged in to 
our electronics. When we 
travel, we are no better. 

Just like most college 
kids, when I leave the house 
for a few hours, I make sure 
I have my cell phone and 
mp3 player. You never know 
when you are going to need 
to blast a song and take a 
video of yourself dancing in 
your car, right? When I 
leave for a few days howev- 
er, I have got a technological 
stock pile that NASA might 
declare as a small traveling 
laboratory. With my cell 
phone, mp3 player and 
external hard drive, digital 
camera, laptop, power cords 
and other odds and ends for 
everything, I can embark on 
any trip and still entertain 
the masses. 

This past summer, my 
traveling mass of gigabytes 
and cords went pi-etty much 
everywhere 1 went. It went 



to my crappy summer job. 
mini road trips, outdoors 
and even for a train ride or 
two. However, there was one 
trip that changed the way I 
travel. 

For a change of pace 
(and because I had a car 
that could barely make it 20 
miles), I decided to take the 
train to Pittsburgh to visit 
friends. I live about three 
hours away from the Steel 
City, so any kind of trip to 
there is going to be for more 
than a few days and having 
all of my electronics is com- 
pletely necessary. As I 
entered the station, I real- 
ized it was going to be an 
empty train. There were 
only two couples in the wait- 
ing room. As I waited, I 
started talking to an elderly 
couple with salt and pepper 
hair. They were obviously 
frequent travelers because 
they had an assortment of 
airport stickers on their 
well-worn suitcases. They 
were gregarious and asking 
me questions about my trip. 
I did not mind the conversa- 
tion because they seemed 
like very interesting people 
so we kept talking. 

Time went on and the 
train finally pulled in the 
station. I got out of my seat 
and I walked with the cou- 
ple, continuing our conver- 
sation. But, while we were 
talking of past traveling 
experiences, my mind was 
multitasking with all the 
things I needed to do on my 
computer. I had DVDs to 



watch and summer class 
work to catch up on. 

When we had picked our 
seats on the empty train car. 
I unloaded everything onto 
the empty chair beside me. I 
realized had made one 
major error while I was 
packing everything up and 
left the power adapter at 
home on my desk. 1 only had 
10 minutes of battery life 
left. It was even more of a 
problem as I had left my 
mp3 player at home under 
the presumption I could just 
listen to music on my com- 
puter. I was completely 
without my multimedia 
machine and I was 
unplugged with nothing to 
do. 

Of course, I was not 
going to wither up and die, 
but it was still a major 
inconvenience. I suppose I 
looked very angry or frus- 
trated as I packed up my 
computer because the elder- 
ly man and woman asked 
me if something was wrong. 
I explained what I had done 
and they kind of understood. 
They had no idea why I 
needed my music, movies, 
saved web pages and games 
all at the same time, but 
they were still sympathetic. 
We started talking again. 

Instead of being bored 
out of my mind for three 
hours, I talked to the couple 
for the entire trip. We talked 
about places we had visited. 
They had visited Italy and I 
had recently visited New 
York City. We talked of 
books, small towns where 
everybody knows everybody, 
family and friends, their 
woodworking creations and 
our musical tastes- mine 
alternative rock, theirs, 
scattered favorites from the 
1940's and 50's. I talked to 
them about my career path 
and adventures in college 
and the man shared some 
real world advice about his 



experiences. Even though 
the list could run on, I didn't 
tire from the conversation 
for a moment. I even discov- 
ered a few more fun summer 
jobs that I had not consid- 
ered. Just from a few hours 
of conversing, I discovered 
that instead of missing out 
on using my computer for 
one trip, I had been missing 
out on the small pleasure of 
human communication for a 
while now. 

Even though it sounds 
ridiculous, I realized just 
how many times a day I 
missed out on talking to 
people. When I walk to 
classes I have my music 
blasting in my ears so peo- 
ple passing by cannot catch 
me in a conversation. 
Instead of just talking to 
people face to face, I rely 
mainly on phone calls, text 
messages and e-mails. I'm 
always glued to a monitor. 
Of course, music can't hurt 
you and you've got to finish 
working on projects, but it's 
interesting to see what you 
can accomplish by simplify- 
ing your day and not having 
a few gigabytes of music 
running loose in an mp3 
player. 

The next time you find 
yourself panicking over lost 
headphones or frantically 
trying to text message peo- 
ple between classes, calm 
down. The world will not 
end if you can't catch your 
favorite song or if your 
friend will not find out for 
50 minutes the color of the 
sweater you just bought 
from the mall. Try getting 
away from always being 
plugged in and maybe your 
day will be a little bit sweet- 
er. 

The author is a sophomore 
communication major and 
Photos & Graphics Editor 
of The Call. 



Miss Manners would not approve 




Adrienne Cain 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_acain@clarion.eclu 

My original article for 
the launch of "You. In. 
Grey." was a thoughtful 
examination of my personal 
paranoia about inanimate 
objects hating me. However, 
after Monday night's per- 
formance of "Recycled 
Percussion" 1 decided on a 
different route. While the 
band was spectacular, I 
somehow managed to find 
myself in an impossible 
pocket of people who had 
either a.) never been to a 
concert before or b.) had no 
idea about how to act at a 
concert. I seem to often find 
myself in such pockets. Now, 
I either have the worst luck 
for performances or a lot of 
people do not know how to 
properly act at performanc- 
es. Being the awesome per- 
son I am, 1 decided to dedi- 
cate this column to helping 
the uniformed. I guess I am 
just nice like that. 

For your convenience 
(and possible shame,) I will 
now list the rules of enter- 



tainment^ 

General Entertainment: 

1. Turn off your cell phone. 
. vt no point will you need it 
during the show. You do not 
need to check the clock. You 
do not need to answer a call 
or text from your 
boyfriend/girlfriend/best 
friend/pet gerbil/caped arch- 
nemesis/or a caped gerbil 
arch-nemesis. 

2. When the show starts, 
stop talking. Use silent com- 
munication like the nod of a 
head or a raise of the eye- 
brow. 

3. If you had talent, you 
would be on the 
stage/screen. Since, you are 
in the audience, it should 
tell you something. The 
actors/musicians can get 
along just fine without your 
continual shouts of encour- 
agement. Similarly, you are 
not part of the band/troupe 
and they do not need you to 
adlib for them. 

4. Actors and musicians do 
in fact know their own 
names. You know that really 
quiet, emotional part of that 
song/performance? It was 
not put there for you to yell 
out someone's name. Here is 
something you will never 
hear a star say: "I was up 
there, on stage and someone 
yelled out my name! At that 
moment I just knew I had to 
have that person on my 
team/invite that person on 



stage/sleep with that per- 
son." 

5. Do not show up late. 

Film Specific: 

1. You know that bag of 
Doritos that you smuggled 
in oh-so-slickly beneath 
your coat? It smells strongly 
and is loud. You will survive 
without grazing for two 
hours. If your food of choice 
is either pungent or comes 
in a noisy wrapper, leave it 
in the car. 

2. If you came with a friend 
who has already seen the 
film, stop asking them what 
is going to happen next. It 
will all come in due time. If 
you have seen the film and 
your friend keeps asking 
you those questions, feel 
free to hit them in the head 
with your half eaten box of 
Raisinettes. 

3. If the film is terrible, 
leave or sit quietly and com- 
plain in your head. The peo- 
ple around you ijiay actually 
be enjoying the film. What 
they do not enjoy is your 
continual pronouncements 
of "Oh, come on! This 
sucks!" 

Concert Specific^ 

1. Those people on stage are 
working hard. Nod your 
head, bob up and down or 
clap. If you stand there like 
a piece of driftwood, do not 
be surprised when you are 



summarily picked up and 
passed to the back of the 
audience. If you have no 
enthusiasm, why bother? 

2. Sometimes the people 
around you are actually 
there for the opening band 
alone. If such a person asks 
you to let them in front of 
you for the opening band, let 
them go. Similarly, if you 
are 6 foot tall and the per- 
son behind you is 5 foot tall, 
let them in front of you. 
They will not impede your 
view. 

3. Moshing. Don't. Okay? 
You paid $50 to be in the pit. 
Maybe you should actually 
listen to the music you are 
supporting. No one is 
impressed by you chicken- 
hawking around in a circle 
and slamming into people. 
In fact, such an act can often 
build ill-will. If you have to 
mosh, do it on the lawn as 
far away from the actual 
concert as possible. Try the 
parking lot. 

Theatre Specific: 

1. Do you have a real or 
imagined funky odor coming 
off of you? Here is a little 
tip, do not attempt to mask 
the scent with strong per- 
fume or cologne. Shower 
before the performance and 
use deodorant. Both things 
go a long way. 

2. Life is not Uke junior 
high. Do not "ooh","aww" or 
hoot when actors kiss or 



riaUielte to Ike Kior and I all on lou 



,^.1 1 "BJ 



■^ff^fMIPii 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmeil Student Complex 

Clarion UnlversHy of Pennsylvania 

Cfarton. PA 16214 

Ptione: 814393.2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: ciartoncail.clafkm.edu E-mail: calltdarion.edu 

Executivo Board 
20062007 



•^ 



Lindsay Grystar, 
Editor4n-Chief 

Tina Sickler, 
Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desmond, 
Features Editor 

Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 



Amy Kaylor, 
Business Manager 

Michael Balchin, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
F^otos & Graphics Editor 

josh Doran, 
Online Editor 

Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 



Dr. Susan Hilton 
Adviser 



Staff 

Hmm Natalie Kenneil, Kelly Pennlsl, Adam Mohney, 
Shakira O'Neil, Krystai Ftnkbeiner FMtofi^ Danielle 
Butcherlne, Deidra Horreil, Nicole Velasquez 
Entet^totMMifc Dominic Giatlombardo, Emily Aaron, Robyn 
Gray, Grace Regalagado S poHy Chris Parks, Michael 
WateHoo. Robert Rankin Qem BdMngi Michele Straub. 
Nicole Bovaird, Adrienne Cain MwufMruf i Lauren Couch, 
Courtney Krol, Jenna Peno, Mike Smith Biialna>i; Sarah 
Slelski, Stephanie Corso, Shawn Turner, Ben Elliot 
PhOtOIBIIBfty imd ftlSillfiK Bethany Ross, IVIike Cauvei, 
MIsha Snyder, Jenifer Pobiete, Phil Drelick, Thomas Fair 
Orcuiattoii; Eric Levy, Allison Kerr, Nicole Lawrence, John 
Biumer, Ryan Bridge, Bryan Bingham 

Policies 

The Clarton Cal! is the student-run newspaper of Ctarlon 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submlssi<Mis from all sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and obscen- 
ity; the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must bb received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays, if the author 
of a letter wish^ to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation, 

information boxes (inctuding PSAs) are published only based 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors ms^ mm & print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co^xirricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
biiities for the entire semester wiW be granted a co-cun-icuiar. 

The Clarion Call is funded l^ advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
cow is free; additional copies are $1.00. 

■ Opinions expressed /n this 
publication are those of the writer or 
speaker, and do not necessarily reflect 
the opinions of the newspaper staff, stu- 
dent t)ody, Clarion University or the com- 
munity. 



engage in any serious sensu- 
al activity/innuendo. 
Similarly, do not make out 
in the audience. 

3. Do not eat anything! 

I know now that you've 
probably read this over and 
said to yourself, "Darn! Isn't 
that a little harsh? Aren't 
there exceptions to these 
rules?" Well, of course there 
are exceptions. If you are a 
doctor, high-ranking official 
or the ruler of the universe, 
feel free to take calls and 
text as much as you want. 
Since, however, if you are 
reading this you are most 
likely none of those things, 
adhere to these little rules. 
When actors/musicians are 
pleased with the crowd, they 
tend to perform better. Take 
this little bit of advice to 
heart. It will work out for 
everyone involved. Trust 
me. 




Calling all 
students! 

Write on opbilon 
piece for the 



le«eo*^*'l«teci 




or for 



Let the student body know Itow 

you feel about a subject that Is 

important to you or raise 

awareness about an 

occun^ence that is overiooited 

on campus on in the nation. 



Submissions are 
ahvays accepted! 



I 



September 21. 2006 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



fatim 



Nakley makes example out of students, asks for feedback 



Nicole Velasquez 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_nmvalasque®clarion,edu 

A buzz of excitement 
filled the air on Oct. 19 a.s 
the seats of Hart Chapel 
began to fill with students, 
faculty and community 
members who had come to 
hear the opening speaker in 
Clarion University's Martin 
Luther King Jr. 2006-07 
Speaker Series. The theme 
for this year's series is enti- 
tled, "The World Today: 
What Would Martin Luther 
King Jr. Say?" 

As the series' opening 
speaker, Ray Nakley Jr. took 
the stage, he gave thanks to 
the hosts of the series and 
thanked the members of the 
audience who came out to 
hear him. After he informed 
the audience that, "Tonight 
you are going to be the star.s 
of the show," survey packets 
were distributed to the audi- 



ence, making for an inter- 
esting twist in the evening's 
projected agenda. 

Nakley, a native of 
Youngstown, Ohio, earned a 
bachelors degree while 
attending Youngstown State 
University. As a resident, 
Nakley has been a 
spokesman for the Arab- 
American Community 
Center of Greater 
Youngstown. 

In late June and early 
July of this year, Nakley 
traveled with Angle Shaker, 
a journalist for 

Youngstown's ABC network 
affihate WYTV News, and a 
group of others to Palestine 
and Israel for 10 days to 
lead an experiment on 
National Media Coverage of 
the Palestine-Israel conflict. 
The question behind his 
experiment was, "Would the 
local news have the same 
biases as news coverage on 
the national level?" 

Nakley presented the 
seven three minute news 



spots that aired on Channel 
33's evening news, and 
asked that the audience 
respond to them on the 
questionnaire. Each spot 
covered a different aspect of 
the Palestinian-Israeli con- 
flict. From a daunting lack 
of medical resources in 
Palestine to the Israeli's 
fear of Palestinian terror 
acts, the news segments 
shed light on the lesser- 
known features of the con- 
flict. 

The portion of the 
evening in which Nakley 
asked for the audience's 
feedback, most people 
agreed that they were more 
sympathetic toward the 
Palestine. Others felt that 
the coverage was equal for 
both the Palestinian's side 
and the Israeli's side. 

Something agreed on by 
many was that they learned 
a lot more about the 
Palestinian's point of view 
from the local media cover- 
age of the conflict than they 




Miaha Synder/rhe Clarion Call 
Ray Nakly Jr. - Nakly spoke in Hart Chapel Tuesday about the news ' portrayal of the 
Palesinian-lsraeli conflict. 



had learned from their past 
exposure to national media 
coverage. 

Nakley is aiming to col- 
lect 1000 survevs from his 



presentations. Ho is hopeful 
that these surveys will give 
an indication as to whether 
or not the news story influ- 
enced people, if it stimulat- 



ed them to gain a greater 
knowledge and to give an 
indication of how much peo- 
ple know about the matter. 



Campyf <iese'UB 




Danielle Butcherine 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_dnbutcheri@clarion.edu 

"I decided to come to 
Clarion because it wasn't 
too close to home, but not 
too far away that 1 couldn't 
go home," Ashley 

Makarevich, a graduate of 
Neshannock Senior High 
School, said. Makarevich 
also said, "Clarion has a 
highly respected education 
department," which helped 
with her choice to attend 
school here. 

Makarevich has been 
working with children her 
entire life, which is part of 
the reason she decided to 
major in early childhood and 



special education. 

"I really enjoy working 
with kids," she said. "A lot of 
teachers I had influenced 
my life. I want to be a 
teacher that influences stu- 
dents. I also have a passion 
for working with those with 
disabilities. To make a dif- 
ference in their lives would 
mean more to me than any- 
thing else." 

Makarevich has man- 
aged to earn a spot on the 
dean's list every semester 
since starting school at 
Clarion. Aside from working 
hard to keep her grades up, 
she is actively involved with 
organizations on and off 
campus. 

Makarevich is employed 
by the Career Service 



Center on campus. 

"The Career Service 
Center is a place where stu- 
dents can go to find out 
about on and off campus 
employment," Makarevich 
said. "Students can also 
have a resume set up, have 
their resumes looked over 
and participate in mock 
interviews. We do work with 
the Teacher Recruiting Fair 
and Experience Expo and 
direct students interested in 
doing volunteer work to 
agencies that need volun- 
teers." 

Makarevich's main job 
at the Career Service Center 
is serving as an administra- 
tive assistant Ms. Diana 
Brush. 

"I do a lot of clerical 



work," Makarevich said. 
"Our first priority is to cater 
to the students and employ- 
ees that come to the office. 
We also work on projects 
assigned to us, do work with 
database systems and do 
agency directory updates 
and contact reports." 

Makarevich was also 
involved with Circle K, a 
service organization on cam- 
pus that is affiliated with 
Kiwanis. 

"Last year I worked at 
the Kiwanis French fry 
stand at the Autumn Leaf 
Festival," she said. "This 
year we are doing a lot of 
work around the community 
to promote literacy." 

Makarevich is currently 
the secretary for the 
Student Council for 
Exceptional Children. 

"[The group] deals with 
individuals with special 
needs. We do a lot of work 
with the Special Olympics 
and work throughout the 
community with individuals 
with special needs," she 
said. 

As community service 
chair, Makarevich is also 
involved with Penn 
AEYC/ACEI. 

"The main goal of the 
organization is to work with 
children and their families," 
Makarevich said. "We do a 
lot to include children in the 
community, with holiday 
parties and other activities. 
We also participate in an 
annual clothing drive that 
benefits Stop Abuse for 
Everyone (SAFE), have a 
Kiddie Day Parade, make a 
float for the children at the 
Siler Center during A.L.F 



and attend different confer- 
ences throughout the year." 

The group also holds an 
event called the "Week of 
the Young Child." 

"Every year, there is a 
theme for the week," 
Makarevich said. "We go 
somewhere and set up dif- 
ferent groups and the kids 
that come to the event move 
from group to group to learn 
about ways to build them up 
in life." 

Last semester, 

Makarevich attended a 
board meeting for Campus 
Ministries. While there, she 
helped the board come up 
with different ways to help 
promote the organization on 
campus and ways to get stu- 
dents involved. 

Makarevich also worked 
at the Majors Fair last year. 
While there, she represent- 
ed of the Career Service 
Center. 

"I spoke to students on 
campus about what they can 
do to get involved," she said. 
"1 spoke to a lot of teaching 
majors about the impor- 
tance of education and what 
they need to do to get start- 
ed on their future now." 

Makarevich also kept 
herself busy by volunteering 
at the Siler Center last 
semester and organizing the 
Special Olympics Bowling 
Event, in which people 
helped those with special 
needs participate in a game. 

During the summer, 
Makarevich keeps herself 
busy by working for the 
Lawrence County 

Association for Retarded 



Citizens as a special educa- 
tion counselor. 

"The program is for chil- 
dren between the ages of 
three and 21. In the morn- 
ing, we have free time and 
take attendance to see who 
is there for the day. After 
attendance, we have anoth- 
er period of free time where 
the campers get to play on 
the playground. Then the 
campers participate in 
activities based on the 
theme of the day. After that, 
we have lunch, have more 
free time and then have 
group time," she said. 

Although Makarevich 
keeps herself busy by study- 
ing, working and participat- 
ing in numerous organiza- 
tions, she manages to find 
•some free time. 

"I like to hang out with 
my friends and my room- 
mates," she said. "I like to 
relax and not worry about 
what's due tomorrow or 
what's due next week. I also 
like to go to the Rec and 
watch movies." 

After graduating from 
Clarion, Makarevich hopes 
to get a job teaching early 
childhood or special educa- 
tion. 

"I would be happy with 
either," she said. "I would 
like to go back home and 
find a job within an hour or 
so of home, but if that's not 
possible, I am willing to 
move. I'm also planning on 
getting my master's degree 
in either special education 
or psychology, hopefully 
here at Clarion." 



Cooking game teaches household lessons 



Mike Musgrove 

The Washington Post 

Playing with your food 
is now a video game, with 
the release this week of 
Cooking Mama for the 
Nintendo DS-a goofy but 
diverting title that comes 
with nearly subliminal cook- 
ing lessons built in. 

The game's premise is 
that a mom -like character is 
teaching the player how to 
prepare some dishes. The 
Japanese title features 76 
recipes, from fried eggs up 
to more complex entrees 
such as pork curry with rice. 

Will it be a hit? Maybe, 
maybe not. But the innova- 
tive import is an example of 
the sort of oddball product 
that game fans are starting 



to appreciate about 
Nintendo's handheld sys- 
tem. Cooking Mama is just a 
game, sure, but it's one that 
latches on to the repetitive 
nature of game-playing to 
sneak in some how-to les- 
sons. 

For gamemakers 

stretching to deliver a new 
experience, it also helps that 
Nintendo's gadget has an 
innovative way to let play- 
ers interact with their 
games. Cooking Mama clev- 
erly uses the DS touch-pad 
screen-tap on an onion to 
cut it up, then swirl the 
device's stylus on the screen 
to shake a pan and make 
sure the ingredients don't 
burn. 

Although Cooking 

Mama is the first cooking 
title to hit the DS in this 



country, this is a market 
that has already found an 
audience in Japan. 

Game publisher Majesco 
Entertainment brought 
Cooking Mama, done in that 
ubercutesy style of 
Japanese animation to this 
country from Japan, where 
it was a top- 10 seller. 

Priced at $20, the game 
is a little cheaper than the 
typical new DS title, and 
Majesco is hoping this game 
will be an impulse buy for 
parents used to having to 
pay , $30 or more for a 
Nintendo DS game, said Liz 
Buckley, senior product 
manager at Majesco. 

A few years back, 
Nintendo was starting to 
seem like a laggard in the 
game console market, with 
rumors that the company 



would drop out of the hard- 
ware business to focus on 
cranking out more Mario 
and Zelda games. These 
days, as Sony seems to suf- 
fer one setback after anoth- 
er with its expensive and 
ambitious PlayStation 3, 
Nintendo is starting to look 
a bit smarter. 

Now that the DS has 
produced such a quirky cat- 
alog of fun new experiences, 
many gamers are hoping 
that Nintendo's upcoming 
console, called the Wii, will 
encourage the same amount 
of creativity from game 
designers with its unusual 
motion-detecting controller 
that lets players swing it 
like a bat if they are trying 
to hit a ball in a baseball 
game. 




Page 6 



THE CLARION CALL 



September 21. 2006 



Different platforms for different players 



Stephanie Desmoid 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond®clarion.edu 

When it comes to video 
games, there are two groups 
that one can tall into. 

The first includes the 
actual gamers. Although 
their experience levels dif- 
fer, these are the ones who 
know the difference between 
role playing and adventure 
games. 

The second group is 
made of the girlfriends of 
the members of group one 
(and sometimes boyfriends) 
who nod their heads and 
smile as their partners rant 
and rave about the latest 
game in their library. 

The latter group can 
also be divided into two sub- 
groups- those who stop at 
nodding and smiling, and 
those who embrace their sig- 
nificant other's passion. 
Members in the second 
group take on the enormous 
task of catching up on 40 
years of knowledge and 
understanding of the highly 
sophisticated systems that 
are used today. 

Everyone knows the 
classics: Pong, Pac Man, 
Asteroids and Tetris. But, 
today's market is much 
more advanced. It can be 
hard to keep up, but popu- 
larity is as high as ever. 

According to arstechni- 
ca.com, 77 percent of men 
between the ages of 16 and 
25 play video games on a 
regular basis. Games, hard- 



ware and accessories bought 
in 2001 brought in slightly 
undtT $10 billion and new 
systtMiis are released every 
year, with up to 15 games 
released per month, per 
platform. 

The first place to start is 
with the platforms them- 
selves. Three companies 
dominiite the video game 
market: Microsoft, Sony and 
Nintendo. 

Microsoft entered the 
market a reasonably long 
time after the other two 
companies, but they made 
their presence known. They 
released the Xbox in 2001. 
The company used its com- 
puter knowledge to get an 
edge over competitors, but 
they dragged behind. 

This console allows 
players to play games, 
watch movies and listen to 
music. It also includes 
access to Xbox Live, a pro- 
gram that allows players to 
compete against other play- 
ers from around the world. 
Currently, it sells for about 
$150. 

In 2005, the company 
released their second plat- 
form, the Xbox 360. All of 
the Xbox features remain 
the same, with the addition 
of some further attributes: 
the ability to view digital 
photos and talk to others 
through Xbox Live. 

Xbox 360 is offered in 
two different packages, 
which can present some con- 
fusion. 

The core system 
includes the console, a con- 



ASKWCrO'R.mCiIl'E 



Dear Doctor Eagle, 

As a freshman last year, I gained the dreaded "fresh- 
man fifteen." Over the summer I lost the excess weight. 
I don't want to gain the weight back so I was wondering 
if you had any tips that can help me. 

Signed, 

Healthy Weight 



Dear Healthy Weight, 

The reason students gain weight when they come to 
school is that their eating habits and activity levels 
change. Maintaining a healthy activity level and adher- 
ing to a well balanced diet will help control weight fluc- 
tuation. The rec center on campus is a great place to 
work out or play a sport. If you live off campus, walk to 
class instead of driving. Also, take the stairs instead of 
the elevator. 

The dining halls on campus offer a variety of high- 

£j^ . calorie and high-fat foods, 

^l^^^^^uf^^^l*/ but there are also lowcalorie 

^^HHtflH^iP^ foods available. Choose 

^ W^^BW y broiled, grilled or baked meat 

/"^Wm^^ "'' Po^^^^y instead of breaded 

{ f*^ -^^ J items such as chicken 

^- — T^r nuggets or patties. Limit 

amounts of cheese or cream 
sauces, dressing, gravy, but- 
ter, mayonnaise, and cream 
cheese because of the extra 
calorias. Add more fiber into 
your meal by having whole 
grain cereal or bread, 
legumes and vegetables. If 
you do not like the vegetables 
on the grill get some from the 
salad bar and cook them in 
the microwave. When you get 
a salad from the salad bar, watch the amount of dressing 
you use. The fiber from the vegetables will satisfy one's 
hunger without adding the extra calories. Also, drink 
water or low-fat milk instead of soda or juice. A can of 
regular soda contains around 140 calories. Frozen yogurt 
is a good deseH, but adding candy or chocolate adds 
unnecessary calories. The main thing is to watch por- 
tions and be sure to avoid overeating. 
In addition, alcohol can also contribute to the excess 
weight. A 12 oz. beer has around 140 calories, one wine 
cooler has around 260 calories, a shot of vodka or gin has 
around 120 calories, and a shot of whiskey has around 
220 calories. Avoiding alcohol and fatty foods, as well as 
staying active, can serve as the best remedy for keeping 
off that "freshman fifteen." 




Dr. Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson of the Keeling 
Health Center. For more information or to suggest a 
topic, e-mail her at s_smwilson@clarion.edu. 



troller and AV cables. 
Although this option is the 
cheaper of the two, at about 
$300, gamers' options are 
limited. Players cannot play 
original Xbox games, save 
games, use Xbox Live or 
chat with others. 

At almost $400, players 
can upgrade to a system 
that includes a hard drive, 
headset and Ethernet cord. 
These additions allow users 



released a slimmer version 
of the system that included 
a screen for portability. 

Following PlayStation's 
success, Playstation 2 was 
released in 2000. The con- 
sole included enhanced 
graphics and DVD playing 
ability. 

A redesigned version 
came out in 2005. It was a 
smaller version that includ- 
ed an Ethernet port for net- 




to do things the core system 
does not offer. 

Xbox released Halo: 
Combat Revolved in 2001. 
The game became an 
instant hit, resulting in 
three subsequent games for 
Xbox and Xbox 360. This 
allowed Microsoft to emerge 
in the market as a force to 
be reckoned with. 

In 1995, Sony released 
the Playstation to compete 
with Nintendo's Super 
Nintendo Entertainment 
system. Later, Sony 



Shasta Kuttz/The Clarion Call 

work gaming. This system 
costs consumers about $130. 

Sony also offers a 
portable version of the 
Playstation. The current 
model is the PSP, or 
Playstation Portable. This 
system includes a plethora 
of features including 
Internet capabilities and 
music play. 

The system also uses 
Memory Stick Duo to store 
personal music and movies. 
Hollywood movies are also 
available on special 



Universal Media Disks for 
PSP playback. 

Game play is enhanced 
through the high resolution 
screen and wireless capabil- 
ities. The PSP currently 
costs about $200. 

Nintendo started its 
gaming history in 1981 
when it released the first 
arcade game, Donkey Kong. 
In 1985, it released the 
Nintendo Entertainment 
System. Nintendo then 
released a portable version 
that could only display 
shades of green (later 
upgraded to full color). 
Game Boy, in 1989. 

The Super Nintendo 
Entertainment System fol- 
lowed in 1991, which includ- 
ed better graphics and a 
remodeled design. 

Three dimensional 

graphics emerged in 1996 
with the Nintendo 64 sys- 
tem. The Game Boy was 
upgraded to Game Boy 
Advance in 2001 with better 
color and graphics. 

In 2000, Nintendo 
released its most recent sys- 
tem: Gamecube. This was 
the first system in which 
Nintendo used disks instead 
of cartridges. 

The platform allows 
players to compete online, 
has state-of-the-art graphics 
and allows gamers to play 
their Game Boy through the 
system. 

The Game Boy play has 
also been advanced, through 
the Nintendo DS. Released 
in 2004, the DS includes a 
range of new features. 




On both sides of the sys- 
tem are dual screens. The 
bottom has touch-screen 
capability with a stylus. It 
also includes wireless 
access, a microphone for 
chatting and a port for 
Game Boy Advance games. 

The DS was slimmed 
down earlier this year, and 
was named the DS Lite. 

Both of Nintendo's cur- 
rent systems cost relatively 
less than its competitors. 
The Gamecube costs about 
$100 and the DS Lite runs 
for $130. 

Nintendo has developed 
such famous characters as 
Mario, Zelda and Kirby. 

Sony and Nintendo will 
be releasing new systems in 
November. 

The Playstation 3 will 
include a built-in hard disk 
drive, a new controller and 
movie play with Blue Ray 
disks. 

Nintendo's Wii is 
shaped unlike any other 
Nintendo platform. The con- 
troller is the most innova- 
tive feature. It is shaped 
like a remote control, and it 
wirelessly senses and sends 
users' movements to the sys- 
tem. 

It also includes the 
Nunchuk controller with an 
analog stick that allows 
players to move their char- 
acters on screen. 



Student wins publishing opportunity 



Deidra Horrell 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_dlhorrelli@clarion.edu 

Sarah Huth, a junior 
secondary education major, 
will have an essay pertain- 
ing to violence on television 
published in "Authors of 
Tomorrow." Throughout her 
essay, Huth discusses 
whether detrimental televi- 
sion programming can be 
accused of influencing view- 
ers to commit crimes or if 
some other reason, such as 
how much family interven- 
tion is present in a house- 
hold, is responsible. 

For Huth, violence on 
TV has been a "topic of 
interest" throughout her 
family, a high school English 
teacher and herself for quite 
some time. When a scholar- 
ship opportunity allowed 
her to express her opinion 
on the debatable issue, 
Huth made sure to apply. 

Since her freshman 
year, Huth's mother had 
registered her with fast- 
web. com. Through this 
scholarship program, Huth 
is continually presented. 



with different scholarships 
that match her interests as 
they become available. In 
July 2006, Huth became 
knowledgeable about the 
contest sponsored by Elder 
and Leemaur Publishers, 
and decided to enter. 

After doing some 
research and referring to 
articles on detrimental tele- 
vision programming, Huth 
developed her essay. Among 
all the applicants, Huth 
placed in the top 3 percent 
of over 5000 essay submis- 
sions. Her essay will go on 
to be published in a book 
entitled "Authors of 
Tomorrow." For Huth, this is 
a "very prestigious" honor 
that will hopefully "propel 
her forward" as an author. 

"Authors of Tomorrow" 
features essays that cover 
four very debatable topics. 
These include nuclear pro- 
liferation, stem cell 
research, escalating home 
prices and violence on TV. 

"I really hope it's going 
to be a feather in my cap for 
future endeavors," she said. 

As for finding out about 
the scholarship, Huth will 
know if she received it dur- 



ing the first week of 
October. Up to $10,000 in 
scholarships are available. 

During her junior and 
senior year of high school, 
Huth was also the recipient 
of VFW's Voice of Democracy 
State Scholarship. Huth 
was awarded a scholarship 
of $1000 and traveled to 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Huth's passion for writ- 
ing began at an early age. 
Ever since she was young, 
her mother stressed the 
'importance of reading" by 
finding time to read daily 
with her daughter. As she 
grew older, Huth began to 
read as many books, as well 
as book series, that she 
could get her hands on. 

"I ate books," Huth said. 

In the future, Huth 
would like to pursue a 
career as an author of chil- 
dren's books and even pro- 
vide her own illustrations. 
She is pursuing a minor in 
painting and 2D Studio Art 
along with her secondary 
English major. Jan Brett, a 
popular children's book 
illustrator, is one of Huth's 
inspirations because of her 
ability to tell "a story within 



a story." 

"I think English writing 
is one of the most powerful 
ways to convey a message," 
Huth said. "It can be applied 
to any date and time peri- 
od." 

Huth believes that writ- 
ing "affects mass amounts of 
people" and because it is an 
"open art form," it allows an 
individual to "release your- 
self," as well as be "creative, 
imaginative" and "express 
views." 

Huth is also a Resident 
Assistant in Becht Hall and 
an active member of Big 
Brothers Big Sisters, a pro- 
gram that involves role 
models with children experi- 
encing problems at home or 
school. 

Working for University 
Relations in the Sports 
Information Department, is 
also another responsibility 
Huth takes on. She typically 
works in the press box dur- 
ing football games and cov- 
ers stats for basketball. 

Aside from the universi- 
ty, Huth dances ballet and 
ballroom and rides horses in 
her free time. 



Constitution Day: U.S. flag facts 



The Washington Post 

Sunday is Constitution 
Day, the anniversary of the 
day in 1787 that the dele- 
gates to the Constitutional 
Convention met in 

Philadelphia to sign that 
important document. One 
might want to wave a U.S. 
flag in their honor this 
weekend. ' 

Our current flag, the 
one we pledge allegiance to 
at school and scout meet- 
ings, has been around since 
July 4, 1960. That was when 
a 50th star was added for 
Hawaii, which became a 
state the year before. Other 
than adding stars for new 
states, the flag hasn't 
changed since the early 



1800s. 

Some flag facts: 

■ The "Liberty Tree" flag, a 
green tree on a white back- 
ground, was flown by 
American ships in New 
England around 1775. Pine 
trees were symbols of 
strength. 

■ The Continental Navy is 
said to have flown a 
"Rattlesnake"' flag in 1775. 
The snake meant resistance 
to British authority. No orig- 
inals of this flag survive. 
The widely seen '"Don't 
Tread on Me" version is 
based on written accounts, 
and there are several styles. 

■ The "Grand Union" is con- 
sidered the nation's first 
flag. It was flown by George 
Washington's troops in 
1776. The 13 stripes repre- 



sent the 13 colonies. The 
crosses of saints George and 
Andrew were for England 
and Scotland. 

■ Betsy Ross is often credit- 
ed with making a flag with 
13 stripes and a round pat- 
tern of stars on a blue field. 
This flag bears her name 
and was the official U.S. flag 
from June 1777 to May 
1795. The original design, 
supposedly given to Ross by 
George Washington, called 
for six-pointed stars. She 
suggested five points 
because she could make 
them with one snip of her 
scissors. 

■ As of July 4, 1818, flags 
had to have 13 stripes and 
one star for each of the 20 
states, but Congress didn't 
say how to arrange the 




The Washington PostI 

stars. The "Grand Star"' flag 
put the stars in a star pat- 
tern. 

■ The Smithsonian's "Star- 
Spangled Banner," the flag 
at Maryland's Fort 
McHenry that Francis Scott 
Key wrote about, has 15 
stripes. 



Page 7 



THE CLARION CALL 



September 21. 2006 



tiUHiiiMdit 

Country takes over CampusFest '06 



Emily Aaron 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_emaaron@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 18- 
Country Stars Jamie 
O'Neal, Craig Morgan and 
Gary Allan performed in the 
Tippin Gymnasium Sunday 
evening at 6 p.m. for the 
first Fall CampusFest. 

First to perform was 
Jamie O'Neal. She hit the 
stage with "There is no 
Arizona" and got the crowd 
pumped and ready to go. 
After a few songs she 
brought her 3-year-old 
daughter, xMiyah, on stage. 
Aliyah told the audience her 
name and age. She then 
sang a verse of her mother's 
song, "Somebody's Hero." 
This was a tear jerker 
amongst the crowd. O'Neal 
then finished up the song 
with extreme passion. 



Almost every girl in the 
audience had their phones 
in the air calling their moth- 
ers. O'Neal took about six of 
the fans phones and sang 
into it for whoever was on 
the other line. 

She sang many of her 
hit songs, some of which 
were, "When I Think About 
Angels," "Trying to Find 
Atlantis," "Follow Me 
Home" and many more. 

Senior business man- 
agement major Stephanie 
Story said, "Jamie O'Neal 
was totally awesome and an 
amazing person to meet." 

O'Neal interacted with 
the audience the entire time 
she performed from grab- 
bing fans hands, to waving 
her mic out so the crowd 
could sing. Her band was 
also very much into the 
crowd. They did all they 
could to get the fans yelling 



and into the music. After 
her performance, she was 
walking around Tippin talk- 
ing to fans and taking pic- 
tures. This showed her fans 
how dedicated to them that 
she really was. 

Next to perform was 
Craig Morgan. He definite- 
ly put the audience to the 
test with his energetic 
moves and singing. When 
the crowd saw him coming, 
everyone started screaming 
with excitement. One of the 
first songs he sang was 
"Redneck Yacht Club," 
which was a huge hit with 
his fans. 

"The concert was 
rockin'," senior business 
major Josh Nolan said. "My 
favorite part was when 
Craig Morgan sang 'Red 
Neck Yacht Club.' It was 
amazing." 

Some of his other songs 




Crazy Hair Man 



Bethany Ross/Tfie Clarion Call 

Violinist Hank Singer flails his hair all around while playing during a song. 



were, "Almost Home" and 
"What I Love About 
Sundays." His drummer, 
Mike Rogers, put on a solo 
act in the middle of the per- 
formance. Morgan got very 
into the crowd by bringing 
females up on stage to slow 
dance and sing too. The 
girls seemed to be in heaven 
as he was singing. The 
crowd absolutely loved him. 

At the end of his per- 
formance, he jumped out 
into the hands of his fans 
and did a little crowd surf- 
ing. Super senior history 
major Jon DeSantis said, 
"Craig Morgan knew how to 
put on a show. He rocked my 
socks off." 

Last to perform was 
Gary Allan. The crowd 
patiently waited 30 minutes 
for him to come on stage. 
Then finally the lights shut 
off, the crowd began scream- 
ing and he came running up 
on stage. He started his 
show with, "Nothing on but 
!he Radio." It seemed as if 
everyone had been waiting 
for him to perform all night. 
There was so much energy 
from the crowd as he per- 
formed. 

Allan was so proud to 
sing "Man to Man," which 
was number one 10 years 
ago. He stated, "This song 
would have never made it to 
number one without all of 
you to put it there." 

Throughout the show, 
each band member did a 
solo for the crowd, which 
made the fans get even more 
pumped up. His guitar and 
violin player went crazy, 
jamming out and going 
nuts. 

Allan played one of his 
new songs coming out on his 
new album, named "As a 




'Somebody's Hero' 

CampusFest '06. 



Bethany RoM/Tfte Clarion Call 

Jamie 0' Neal sings onstage at 



Crow Flies." "Life ain't 
always beautiful." "I'm just 
no damn good," "Smoke 
Rings in the Dark" and the 
first song he ever released, 
"Change my ways," were 
some of the other songs he 
sang. 

He also sang a very pas- 
sionate song, "Best I Ever 
Had," which was very sym- 
bolic to him. His wife 
passed away a couple of 
years ago and one of his 
friends told him to listen to 
that song. Ever since then 
he has been performing it at 
his shows. It was probably 
the most emotional part of 
the entire concert. The 
crowd knew how important 
it was and some fans were 
even crying. Allan sang the 
song with so much emotion 
that one could see it in his 
eyes. 

After that song, he went 
into a much more upbeat 
song, "Drinking Dark 
Whiskey." The band and 
Allan took a few shots of 
Jack Daniels and got right 
into the song. 

Sadly it seemed as if the 
star was about to leave the 
stage for the night. As Allan 



and his band ran off stage, 
the crowd began chanting; 
"GARY GARY..." and all of 
a sudden he was back on 
stage performing "Songs 
about Rain." The crowd 
went crazy, jumping around 
singing. 

He sang about two more 
songs before he was 
through. At the end of his 
last song, the band jammed 
out and Allan signed fans 
hats, shirts and anything 
else they wanted. 

"When Gary came on 
stage and sang 'Best I ever 
had,' I got goosebumps," 
senior communication major 
Bethany Ross said. "He sang 
it with such raw emotion, so 
much better than Vertical 
Horizon could have ever 
sang it. It brought tears to 
my eyes to see how much he 
put into the song." 

Once the concert was 
over, the crowd poured out 
of Tippin, but all one could 
hear was the talk of how 
good the show was. The 
total ticket sales for the con- 
cert were around $800. 



Recycled items get put to good use 



Grace Regalado 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gvregalado@clarion.edu 

Shasta Kurtz 

Photography/Graphics 

Editor 

s_sdkurtz@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 18 - 
Presented by the UAB, 
Recycled Percussion's "Rock 
Your Junk Tour" jammed 
out their junk to crowd 
friendly concert goers on a 
mellow Monday night. 

Four guys from 
Goffstown, New Hampshire 
formed this unique style of 
percussion over a decade 



ago. Recycled Percussion 
plays over 200 shows a year 
with about five tons of 
equipment. 

Members of Recycled 
Percussion are Justin 
Spencer, Greg Kassapis, 
Ryan Venzia and DJ 
Pharoah. 

Spencer, the man who 
created the band's sound, 
has played drums his entire 
life. His first appearance in 
performing with recycled 
objects was in a high school 
talent show. He wanted to 
break away from the tradi- 
tional drumming scene. He 
then taught his friends on a 
bucket and started playing 
small gigs in college. The 
word spread from there. 



Alex Thompson, the 
band's English/Japanese 
translator, said, "This is 
their fourth year of being 
known for: 'Best Major 
Performance Group,' 'Best 
Entertainment Group,' or 
'Entertainer of the Year' in 
the college market." 

Dave, the director of the 
band, had said a few words 
to get the crowd psyched 
before the initial appear- 
ance. He had used words 
like, "hellacious" and said 
how the show would "blow 
your brains out." The crowd 
grew more stoked after this 
presentation and was ready 
to see the band take the 
stage. 

The band did exactly as 



the director promised. Their 
performance was upbeat, 
quick and intense. 

The lighting on stage 
was very invigorating. 
There was always a differ- 
ent lighting arrangement 
for every song. It seemed 
like the audience couldm't 
stop taking pictures 
throughout the entire show. 

The crowd was in love 
with the music and the 
atmosphere. The audience 
was actively participating 
during motivating rounds of 
clapping and roars and 
cheers from the audience 
swirled in the air. 

Sarah Moore, a junior, 
said, "They were the three 
best percussionists I have 



ever seen. I really liked the 
show; there was a lot of 
energy. It was one of the bet- 
ter concerts I have seen." 

It was obvious the per- 
formers love what they do 
and take extreme pride in 
their work. Each member of 
the band performed their 
own solo piece with either a 
different kind of trash, 
smacking out a beat on their 
stomach or beat-boxing. 

Before the last number, 
sparks were literally flying 
from the stage. All four 
members created a syn- 
cronized spark show by 
grinding down pipes with a 
background beat. It was 
easy to see that Recycled 
Percussion would be leaving 



its mark at Clarion 
University. 

Their final piece was a 
hodpodge of songs the band 
mixed together. They were 
picked from their personal 
influences such as Red Hot 
Chili Peppers, Rush, Led 
Zeppehn, Green Day, A/C 
D/C and Metallica. 

Kassapis, a member of 
Recycled Percussion, said, 
"We have all known each 
other for years. We go back. 
My favorite part of perform- 
ing is being with my best 
friends, traveling, meeting 
people and seeing them 
leave with this amazing 
experience. Branching 

around the world is one 
future aspiration." 




Vtpvi^ of (t^<^ w^ 



Flaying in the trash 



Shasta Kurtz/TTie Clarion Call 

The members of Recycled Percussion use recycled items in order to make the music that they performed in the Gemmell MPR. 



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Sept. 21-23 

Nachd 
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Page 6 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



September 21. 2006 



Different platforms for different players 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_S8desfiici"d#clarion,edu 

When it comes to video 
gameH. there are two proupn 
that one can fall into. 

The fir.st incliide?^ the 
actual gamers. Although 
their exporionco levels dif- 
fer, these are the ones who 
know the difference hetween 
Idle playing and adventure 
games. 

The second K'oup Is 
made of the girlfriends of 
the inenihers of group one 
(and sonii'times hoyfriends) 
who nod their heads and 
smile as their partners rant 
and rave ahoiit the latest 
^anie in their library. 

The latter firoup can 
also be divided into two sub- 
groups^ those who stop at 
nodding and smiling, and 
those who embrace their sig- 
nificant other's passion. 
Members in tlic x'cond 
grou|) take on the I'liorinoii.- 
task of catching up on 10 
years of knowledge and 
understanding of the highly 
sophisticated systems that 
are usi'd today. 

Kveryone knows the 
classics: I'lmg, I'ac Man. 
Asteroids and Tetris. But. 
today's market is much 
more advanced. It can be 
hard to keep up, l)ut popu- 
larity is as high as evei'. 

According to arstechni- 
ca.com. 77 percent of men 
between the ages of ]l\ and 
25 play video games on a 
I'egular basis, (tames, hard- 



ware and Hcce.«4s()ries bought 
in 2(W\ brought in slightly 
under $10 billion and new 
systems are released every 
yewr, with up to ].") games 
felea.sed per month, per 
platform. 

The fir,st place to start is 
with the platforms them- 
selves. Three companies 
dominate the \ ideo game 
market: ,\licrosoti. Sonv and 
Nintendo. 

Microsoft enti'red the 
market a ri-a.sonabh lon;^ 
time nftei' the other two 
companies, but they made 
their presence known. They 
released the Xhox in 201)1. 
The company used its ctjnr 
puter knowli'dge to get an 
eilge ovei' competitors, but 
they dragged behind. 

This console allows 
players to play games, 
watch movies and listen to 
music. It also includes 
access to Xbox l>ive. a pro- 
gram that allows players to 
compete against other play- 
ers from around the woi'ld. 
Currently, it sells for about 
SI. 50, 

In 2()0.'i. th(> I'ompany 
relea.sed their second plat- 
form, the Xho.x :?H(). .Ml of 
the Xbox features remain 
the s:nne, with the addition 
of some further attributes: 
the ability to \iew digital 
photos and talk to others 
through Xbox Live. 

Xhox 'MMl is offered in 
two different packages, 
which can present some con- 
fusion. 

The core system 
includes thi' con.sole, a coir 



n^K^ocro^'Emji'E 



Dviir Doctor PJ.'Ji.'/e, 

.'\.s .'i frv^^hnuin In^t yo:u: I f^niivd the dtvnded "fresh- 
man fifteen." Over the ^umiuci- I /(.wf the e.vce,ss weight. 
I don't \v:iut lo i::un the weii^ht h;iik so I was wondering 
if you had any lips thai run help nie. 

Signed. 

Heahhy Wejgbt 



Dear Healthy Weight. 

The rea.<oi} stmlcnis gain weight when they come to 
school is that their eating habits and activity levels 
change. Mainlaming a healthy activity level and adher- 
ing to a well halanci'd diet will help control weight fluc- 
tuation. The rec center on campus is a great place to 
work out or play .-j ,-7)0;;. If you live off campus, walk to 
class instead of driving. .M.sa. take the stairs instead of 
the elevator. 

The dining halls on campus offer a variety of high- 

calurw and high-fat foods, 
but there ai'e also lowcalorie 
foods available. Choose 
broiled, grilled or baked meat 
or poultry instead of breaded 
It cms such as chicken 
nuggets or patties. Limit 
aminints nf cheese or cream 
sauces, ilressing. gravy, but- 
ter, mayonnaise, and cream 
cheese because of the extra 
calories. .Add more fiber into 
your meal by having whole 
gram cereal or bread, 
legumes and vegetables. If 
you do not like the vegetables 
on the grill get some from the 
salad bar and cook them in 
the microwave. When you get 
a salad from the salad bar. watch the amount of dressing 
you use. The fiber from the vegetables will satisfy one's 
hunger wiihnut adding the extra calories. .i/,so, drink 
water or low -fat milk instead of .soda or juice. A can of 
regular soda contains around 1 10 calories. Frozen yogurt 
is a good desert, but adding candy or chocolate adds 
unnecessar} calories. The mam thing is to watch por- 
tions and be sure to avoid ovei-eating. 
In addition, alcohol can also contribute to the excess 
weight. .\ VJ oz. bci'r has around- 1 10 calories, one wine 
cooler has anjund ■J(M) calories, a shot of vodka or gin has 
around 120 calories, and a shot of whiskev ha> around 
220 calories. .Avoiding alcohol and fatty foods, as well as 
stayhig active, can serve as the best remedy for keeping 
off that "fre.shman fifteen." 



Dr. l-':igli- I" I (/;/(■/) by Sarah Wilson of the Keeling 
Health Center. Tor more information or to suggot a 
topic, e-mail hi'r at s smwilsonMclarion.edu. 




ti-olli'i' and .W cables. 
.Although thi,- option is the 
cheaper of the two. at about 
S;iO(). gamers' options are 
limited. Players cannot play 
original Xhox games, save 
games, use Xhox Live or 
chat with olhi'rs. 

.\t almost $100. players 
can upgrade to a system 
that includes a hard drive, 
headst't and Kthei'tiet cord. 
These additions allow users 



relesised a slimmer version 
of the HV.stetn that included 
a screen for portability 

Following PlayStation's 
success, Playstation 2 was 
released in 2000. 'I'he con- 
sole included enhanced 
graphics and |)\'|) [ilaying 
ability. 

A redesigned version 
came out in 20().'). It was a 
smaller version that includ- 
ed an Kthernet port for net- 




to do things the core syste 
does not off"" 



m 



ter 



Xbox released Halo: 
Combat Hi'volved in 200]. 
The game became an 
instant hit, resulting in 
"'' ' 'quent games for 



tnree suix><equent games tor 
Xbox a ml Xhox :m). This 
allowed .Microsoft to emerge 
in the market as a t'orcc to 
be reckoned with. 

In 199o. Son> rek-ased 
the Playstation to compete 
with Nintendo's Super 
Nintendo Entertainment 



system. Later. 



Stiasta Kurtz/ The Clarion Call 

work gaming, 'i'his .system 
costs consumers about $180. 

Sony also offers a 
portable version of the 
Playstation. The current 
model is the PSP. or 
Playstation Portable. This 
system includes a plethora 
of features including 
Internet capabilities and 
music play. 

The system also uses 
Memory Stick Duo to store 
personal music and movies, 
Hollywood movies are also 
available on special 



Unisersal Media Disks for 
PSP playback, 

(!ame play is enhanced 
through the high resolution 
screen and wireless capabil- 
ities. The PSP currently 
costs about $200. 

Nintendo started its 
gaming history in lO.Sl 
when it relea,sed the first 
arcade game. Donkey Kong, 
In 198.'), It released the 
.Nintendo Knti'rtainment 
Systiun. Nintendo then 
rek'ased a portable version 
that could only display 
shades of green (later 
upgraded to full color), 
(lame |{(»y in 1989, 

The Super Nintendo 
Kntertainment System fol- 
lowed in 1991. which includ- 
ed better graphics and a 
remodeled design. 

Three dimensional 

graphics emerged in 199(i 
with the Nintendo (il sys- 
tem. The (iame Boy was 
upgraded to CI a me Boy 
.\dvance in 2001 with better 
color and graphics. 

In 2000. Nintendo 
released its most recent sys- 
tem: Oamecube. This was 
the first system in which 
Nintendo used disks instead 
of cartridges. 

The platform allows 
players to compete online, 
has state-of-the-art graphics 
and allows gamers to play 
their Game Hoy through the 
system. 

The (!ame Boy play has 
also been advanced, through 
the Nintendo I)S. Relea.sed 
in 2001. the DS includes a 
range of new features. 




On both side.s of the sys- 
tem are dual screens. The 
bottom has touch -screen 
capability with a stylus. It 
also includes wireless 
acce8,s, a microphone for 
chatting and a port for 
(lame Boy .Advance games. 

The DS was slimmed 
down earlier this year, and 
was named the DS Lite. 

Both of Nintendo's cur- 
rent systems cost relatively 
less than its competitors. 
The (lamecuhe costs about 
$100 and the DS Lite runs 
for$i;3(). 

Nintendo has developed 
such famous characters as 
Mario. Zelda and Kirby. 

Sony and Nintendo will 
be releasing new .systems in 
November. 

The Playstation 3 will 
include a built in hard disk 
drive, a new controller and 
movie play with Blue Ray 
disks. 

Nintendo's Wii is 
shaped unlike any other 
Nintendo platform. The con- 
troller is the most innova- 
tive feature. It is shaped 
like a remote control, and it 
wirelessly .senses and sends 
users' movements to the sys- 
tem. 

It also includes the 
Nuncbuk controller with an 
analog stick that allows 
players to move their char- 
acters on screen. 



Student wins publishing opportunity 



Deidra Horrell 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_dlhorrelli@clarion.edu 

Sarah Huth. a junior 
secondary education major, 
will have an essay pertain- 
ing to violence on television 
published in "Authors of 
Tomorrow." Throughout her 
essay. Huth discusses 
whether detrimental televi- 
sion programming can be 
accu.sed of influencing view- 
ers to commit crimes or if 
some other reason, such as 
how much family interven- 
tion is present in a house- 
hold, is responsible. 

For Huth. violence on 
TV has been a "topic of 
interest" throughout her 
family, a high school English 
teacher and herself for quite 
some time. When a scholar- 
ship opportunity allowed 
her to express her opinion 
on the debatable issue. 
Huth made sure to apply. 

Since her freshman 
year. Huth's mother had 
registered her with fast- 
web. com. Through this 
scholarship program. Huth 
is continually presented 



with different scholarships 
that match her interests as 
they become available. In 
duly 200(1. Huth became 
knowledgeable about the 
contest sponsored by KIder 
and Leemaur Publishers, 
and decided to enter. 

After doing some 
research and referring to 
articles on detrimental tele- 
vision programming. Huth 
developed her essay. Among 
all the applicants. Huth 
placed in the top 3 percent 
of over .5000 essay submis- 
sions. Her essay will go on 
to be published in a book 
entitled "Authors of 
Tomorrow." For Huth. this is 
a "very prestigious" honor 
that will hopefully "propel 
her forward" as an author. 

".Authors of '^Ibmorrow" 
features essays that cover 
four very debatable topics. 
These include nuclear pro- 
liferation, stem cell 
research. e,scalating home 
prices and violence on TV, 

"1 really hope it's going 
to be a feather in my cap for 
futui'e endeavors." she said. 

As for finding out about 
the scholarship. Huth will 
know if she received it dur- 



ing the first week of 
October. Up to $10,000 in 
scholarships are available. 

During her junior and 
senior year of high school. 
Huth was also the recipient 
of VFW's Voice of Democracy 
State Scholarship. Huth 
was awarded a .scholarship 
of $1000 and traveled to 
Harrisburg. Pa. 

Huth's passion for writ- 
ing began at an early age. 
Ever since she was young, 
her mother stressed the 
'importance of reading" by 
finding time to read daily 
with her daughter. As she 
grew older, Huth began to 
read as many books, as well 
as book series, that she 
could get her hands on. 

"1 ate books." Huth said. 

In the future, Huth 
would like to pursue a 
career as an author of chil- 
dren's books and even pro- 
vide her own illustrations. 
She is pursuing a minor in 
painting and 2D Studio Art 
along with her secondary 
English major. Jan Brett, a 
popular children's book 
illustrator, is one of Huth's 
inspirations because of her 
ability to tell "a story within 



a story. 

"I think English writing 
is one of the most powerful 
ways to convey a message," 
Huth said. "It can be applied 
to an\- date and time peri- 
od." 

Huth believes that writ- 
ing "affects mass amounts of 
people" and because it is an 
"open art form," it allows an 
individual to "release your- 
self." as well as be "creative, 
imaginative" and "express 
views." 

Huth is also a Resident 
Assistant in Becht Hall and 
an active member of Big 
Brothers Big Sisters, a pro- 
gram that involves role 
models with children experi- 
encing problems at home or 
.'^chool. 

Working for University 
Relations in the Sports 
Information Department, is 
also another responsibility 
Huth takes on. She typically 
works in the press box dur- 
ing football games and cov- 
ers stats for basketball. 

Aside from the universi- 
ty, Huth dances ballet and 
ballroom and rides horses in 
her free time. 



Constitution Day: U.S. flag facts 



The Washington Post 

Sunday is Constitution 
Day, the anniversary of the 
day in 1787 that the dele- 
gates to the Constitutional 
Convention met in 

Philadelphia to sign that 
important document. One 
might want to wave a U.S. 
flag in their honor this 
weekend. 

Our current flag, the 
one we pledge allegiance to 
at school and scout meet- 
ings, has been around since 
July 1, 1960. That was when 
a 50th star was added for 
Hawaii, which became a 
state the year before. Other 
than adding stars for new 
states, the flag hasn't 
changed since the early 



1800s, 

Some flag facts: 

■ The "Liberty Tree"' flag, a 
green tree on a white back- 
ground, was flown by 
American ships in New 
England around 1775, Pine 
trees were symbols of 
strength. 

■ The Continental Navy is 
said to have flown a 
"Rattlesnake"' flag in 1775, 
The snake meant resistance 
to British authority. No orig- 
inals of this flag survive. 
The widely seen "Don't 
Tread on Me" version is 
based on written accounts, 
and there are .several styles. 

■ The "Grand Union" is con- 
sidered the nation's first 
flag. It was flown by George 
Washington's troops in 
177f). The 13 stripes repre- 



sent the 1:3 colonies. The 
crosses of saints George and 
Andrew were for England 
and Scotland. 

■ Betsy Ross is often credit- 
ed with making a flag with 
l.'i stripes and a round pat- 
tern of .stars on a blue field. 
This flag bears her name 
and was the official U.S. flag 
from June 1777 to May 
1 795. The original design, 
supposedly given to Ross by 
George Washington, called 
for six-pointed stars. She 
suggested Ave points 
because she could make 
them with one snip of her 
scissors. 

■ /Vs of July 1. 1818. flags 
had to have i;j stripes and 
one star for each of the 20 
states, but Congress didn't 
say how to airantje the 




The Washington Post/ 

stars. The "Grand Star"' flag 
put the stars in a .star pat- 
tern, 

■ The Smithsonian's "Star 
Spangled Banner." the flag 
at Maryland's Fort 
McHenry that Francis Scott 
Key wrote about, has 15 
stripes. 



Page 7 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



) 



bttmunt 



September 21. 2006 



Country takes over CampusFest '06 



Emily Aaron 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s^eniaaioiKtSclanon.edu 

CLARION. Sept, 18- 
Country Stars »lamie 
O'Neal. Craig Morgan and 
Gary .Allan performed in the 
Tippin Gymnasium Sunday 
evening at 6 p.m. for the 
flrst Kail (^unpiisFest. 

First to perforin wa.s 
Jamie O'Neal. She hi* the 
stage with "There is no 
.\rizona" and got the crowd 
pumped and ready to go. 
.\fter a few songs sh(> 
brought her ^-yearold 
daughter. .Aliyah, on stage. 
.Miyah told the audience her 
name and age. She then 
sang a verse of her mother'.s 
song, "Somebody's Hero." 
This was a tear jerker 
amongst the crowd. O'Neal 
then finished up the song 
with extreme passion. 



.Almost every girl in the 
audience had their phones 
in the air calling their moth- 
ers. O'Neal took about six of 
the fans phones and sang 
into it for whoever was on 
the other line. 

She sang many of her 
hit songs, some of which 
were, "When I Think About 
Angels," "Trying to Kind 
Atlantis," "Ktdlow Me 
Home" and nianv moic. 

Si'nior business man- 
agement major Stephanie 
Story said. "Jamie O'Neal 
was totally awesome and an 
amazing person to meet." 

O'Neal interacted with 
the audience the entire time 
she performed from grab- 
bing fans hands, to waving 
her mic out so the crowd 
could sing. Her band was 
also very much into the 
crowd. They did all they 
could to get the fans yelling 



and into the music. .After 
hi'r performance, she was 
walkuig around Tip|)in talk- 
ing to fans and taking pic- 
tures. This showed her fans 
how dedicated to them that 
she really was. 

Next to perform was 
Craig Morgan. He definite- 
ly put the audience to the 
test with his eiUM'getic 
moves and singing. W'ht'n 
the crowd saw him comuig. 
everyone started .screaming 
with excitement, One of the 
first songs he sang was 
"Redneck Yacht Vhih," 
which was a huge hit with 
his fans. 

"The concert was 
rockin'." senior business 
major Josh Nolan said. "My 
favorite part was when 
Craig Morgan sang 'Red 
Neck Yacht Club,' It was 
ama/ing. " 

Some of his other .son^s 




Betliany Ross/ The Clarion Call 
Crazy Hair Mar) - Violinist Hank Singer flails his hair all around while playing during a song. 



were. ".Almost Home" and 
"What I Love .About 
Sundays." His drummer, 
Mike Rogers, put on a .solo 
act in the middle of the per 
formance. Morgan got very 
into the crowd by bringing 
females up on stage to slow 
dance and sing too. The 
girls seemed to be in heaven 
as he was singing. The 
crowd absolutely loved him. 
.\t the end of his per- 
formance, he jump(>d out 
into the hands of his fans 
and did a little crowd surf- 
ing. Super senior history 
major Jon DeSantis said, 
"Craig Morgan knew how to 
put on a show. He rocked my 
socks off," 

Last to perform was 
Gary Allan. The crowd 
patiently waited :i() minutes 
for him to come on stage. 
Then finally the lights shut 
off, the crowd began scream- 
ing and he came running up 
on stage. He started his 
show with. "Nothing on but 
:he Radio." It .seemed as if 
everyone had been waiting 
for him to perform all night. 
There was so much energy 
fnmi the crowd as he per- 
formed. 

Allan was so proud to 
sing "Man to Man." which 
was number one 10 years 
ago. He stated. "This song 
would have never made it to 
number one without all of 
you to put it there." 

Throughout the show. 
each band member did a 
.solo for the crowd, which 
made the fans get even more 
pumped up. His guitar and 
violin player went crazy, 
jamming out and going 
nuts. 

.Allan played one of his 
new songs coming out on his 
new album, named "As a 




Bethany Ross/r/ie Clarion Call 
'Somebody's Hero" - Jamie 0' Neal sings onstage at 
CampusFest 06. 



Crow Klies." "Life ain't 
always beautiful," "I'm just 
no damn good," "Smoke 
Rings in the Dark" and the 
flrst song he ever released. 
"Change my ways." were 
.some of the other songs he 
.sang. 

He also sang a very pas- 
sionate song. "Best I Kver 
Had." which was very sym- 
bolic to him. His wife 
passed away a couple of 
years ago and one of his 
friends told him to listen to 
that song. Ever since then 
he has been performing it at 
his shows. It was probably 
the most emotional part of 
the entire concert. The 
crowd knew how important 
it was and some fans were 
even crying. .Allan sang the 
song with so much emotion 
that one could see it in his 
eyes. 

.After that song, he went 
into a much more upbeat 
song, "Drinking Dark 
Whi.-^key." The band and 
.Allan took a few shots of 
Jack Daniels and got right 
into the song. 

Sadly it seemed as if the 
star was about to leave the 
stage for the night. As Allan 



and his band ran off .stage, 
the crowd began chanting; 
"GAR\'. GARY..." and all of 
a sudden he was back on 
stage performing "Songs 
about Rain." The crowd 
went crazy, jumping around 
singing. 

He sang about two more 
songs before he was 
through. At the end of his 
last song, the band jammed 
out and .Allan signed fans 
hats, shirts and anything 
else they wanted. 

"When Gary came on 
stage and sang 'Best I ever 
had,' I got goosebumps," 
senior communication major 
Bethany Ross said. "He sang 
it with such raw emotion, so 
much better than Vertical 
Horizon could have ever 
sang it. It brought tears to 
my eyes to see how much he 
put into the song." 

Once the concert was 
over, the crowd poured out 
of Tippin, but all one could 
hear was the talk of how 
good the show was. The 
total ticket sales for the con- 
cert were around $800. 



Recycled items get put to good use 



Grace Regalatjo 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gvregalaclo@clarion.edu 

Shasta Kurtz 

Photography/Graphics 

Editor 

s_sclkurtz@clarion.edu 

CLARION. Sept. 18 - 
Presented by the UAB, 
Recycled Percussion's "Rock 
Your Junk Tour" jammed 
out their junk to crowd 
friendly concert goers on a 
mellow Monday night. 

Four guys from 
Goffstown, New Hampshire 
formed this unique style of 
percussion over a decade 



ago. Recycled Percussion 
plays over 200 shows a year 
with about five tons of 
equipment. 

Members of Recycled 
Percussion are Justin 
Spencer, Greg Kassapis. 
Ryan Venzia and DJ 
Pharoah. 

Spencer, the man who 
created the band's sound, 
has played drums his entire 
life. His first appearance in 
performing with recycled 
objects was in a high school 
talent show. He wanted to 
break away from the tradi- 
tional drumming .scene. He 
then taught his friends on a 
bucket and started playing 
small gigs in college. The 
word spread from there. 



Alex Thompson, the 
band's English/Japanese 
translator, said. "This is 
their fourth year of being 
known for: 'Best Major 
Performance Group,' 'Best 
Entertainment Group.' or 
'Entertainer of the Year' in 
the college market." 

Dave, the director of the 
band, had said a few words 
to get the crowd psyched 
before the initial appear- 
ance. He had used words 
like, "hellacious" and said 
how the show would "blow 
your brains out." The crowd 
grew more stoked after this 
presentation and was ready 
to see the band take the 
stage. 

The band did exactlv as 



the director promised. Their 
performance was upbeat, 
quick and intense. 

The lighting on stage 
was very invigorating. 
There was always a differ- 
ent lighting arrangement 
for every song. It seemed 
like the audience couldm't 
stop taking pictures 
throughout the entire show. 

The crowd was in love 
with the music and the 
atmosphere. The audience 
was actively participating 
during motivating rounds of 
clapping and roars and 
cheers from the audience 
swirled in the air. 

Sarah Moore, a junior, 
said, "They were the three 
best percussionists I have 



ever seen. I really liked the 
show; there was a lot of 
energy. It was one of the bet- 
ter concerts I have .seen." 

It was obvious the per- 
formers love what they do 
and take extreme pride in 
their work. Each member of 
the band performed their 
own .solo piece with either a 
different kind of trash, 
smacking out a beat on their 
stomach or heat-boxing. 

Before the la.st number, 
sparks were literally flying 
from the stage. All four 
members created a syn- 
cronized spark show by 
grinding down pipes with a 
background beat. It was 
easy to see that Recycled 
Percussion would 'be leaving 



its mark at Clarion 
University. 

Their final piece was a 
hodpodge of songs the band 
mixed together. They were 
picked from their personal 
influences such as Red Hot 
Chili Peppers. Rush, Led 
Zeppelin. Green Day, A/C 
D/C and Metallica. 

Kassapis. a member of 
Recycled Percussion, said, 
"We have all known each 
other for years. We go back. 
My favorite part of perform- 
ing is being with my best 
friends, traveling, meeting 
people and seeing them 
leave with this amazing 
experience. Branching 

around the world is one 
future aspiration." 




h -1 sinl- J 



Movie of the week 



. Sliasta Kurtz/The Clarion Call 

Playing in the trash - The members of Recycled Percussion use recycled items in order to make the music that they performed in the Gemmell MPR. 



Sept. 21-23 

Macho 
Libre 



whizriz: 

Gemmell 

whjzn: 

8 p.m. 



Page 8 



TttS CLARION CALL 



September 21. 2006 



Everybody, Everybody! is pretty cool 



Dominic Giallombardo 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_djgiallomb®ctarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 21 - 
Lately, I have been search- 
ing the internet trying to 
find ways to pass the time. 
After all, one can only spend 
so much time on Facebook 
or MySpace. 

In the past few days, I 
visited an old favorite, 
Homestarrunner.com. 
Everyone that matters loves 
this site. Sophomore busi- 
ness major Jessica Brooks 
said, "I enjoy it." 

Created in 1996 by Mike 



Chapman and Craig Zobel, 
this website was originally 
intended to be a children's 
book. In January of 2000, 
homestarrunner.com was 
launched and on its way to 
fame and fortune. Although 
it started small, it quickly 
balooned its way into inter- 
net notoriety. 

The best part of the 
Homestar Runner is obvi- 
ously the Strong Bad e-mail 
cartoons. Sophomore ele- 
mentary education major 
Jessica Klein said "I love the 
Strong Bad e-mails. They 
make me chuckle." My 
favorite episode, sbe- 
mailllS, is when Strong 



Bad's computer contracts a 
virus, lb be exact, his com- 
puter has contracted 
423,827 viruses. A message 
then flashes on the comput- 
er screen saying 
Computer=Zero and 
Virus=very yes. No one in 
the cartoon is able to fix the 
computer as the virus gets 
worse and worse creating all 
kinds of problems that a 
normal virus would create 
on your computer. At the 
end of the cartoon, the char- 
acter Bubs, finally shoots 
the computer and brings the 
chaos to an end. 

Other than sbemails 
there are also games, other 



cartoons, downloadables, a 
store, and of course the legal 
information about the web- 
site. 

The cartoons are funny, 
and as sophomore music 
education major Kurtis Bell 
said, "Homestar Runner is a 
pretty funny site that's good 
to blow some time on." The 
games are simple and fun to 
play. 

A classic game, 
Homestar Talker, makes 
viewers create sentences out 
of words displayed on the 
screen. My favorite sentence 
is, "Homeatar is great and is 
totally a marshmallow. I'm 
not quite sure what the 



point of this game is, but it's 
fun to play." 

An entirely new set of 
games have been launched 
recently. Although I haven't 
played them all, Rhino 
Feeder, seems to have a run- 
ning start on favorite new 
game. Sophomore secondary 
English education major 
Amy Leonard said, "I'm 
rather fond of it, it makes 
me giggle." 

Although most of the 
civilized world knows, loves 
and often reveres Homestar 
Runner, some are unaware 
of its presence in the world. 
When asked about this web- 
site, sophomore elementary 



education major Deserie 
Vendetti said, "I've never 
seen it. Is it that thing with 
the little rodent that swears 
a lot?" This type of response 
is unacceptable. (By the 
way, I do believe she is refer- 
ring to Joecartoon.cora or 
possibly Foamy from 
lllwillpress.com.) I have 
made it my personal goal in 
life to spread the goodness 
of Homestar Runner. His 
joyous singing and running 
shall soon be spread 
throughout the world to 
make everyone say in uni- 
son, "EVERYBODY! 
EVERYBODY! ElVERY- 
BODY LA DI DO DI DO!" 



'The Last Kiss" makes top four this weeic 



Robyn Gray 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rlgray@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 21 -If you 
are a fan of drama or 
romance, 'The Last Kiss" is 
a movie you would want to 
see in theatres soon. 

Released on Sept. 15, 
2006 worldwide, "The Last 
Kiss" currently sits at the 
number four spot on the Top 
Box Office list, trailing 
behind "Gridiron Gang," 
"The Black Dahlia" and 
"Everyone's Hero." This 
movie is said to be some- 
what sought-after, but 
Hollywood Reporter Michael 
Rechtshaffen claims it is, 
"the first smart movie of the 
fall season." 

Starring Zach Braff, 
Jacinda Barrett, Casey 
Affleck, Rachel Bilson, Tom 
Wilkinson, Blythe Danner, 
Eric Christian Olsen and 
Michael Weston, while 
directed by Tony Goldwyn, 



one should expect to see a 
quality film, and this is 
exactly what they get. 

Michael, played by Zach 
Braff, is unlike any charac- 
ter Braff has ever played. 
He is not as Ukeable and is 
very complex. Michael is 29 
years old and realizes that 
everything for the rest of his 
life is "planned out." He is 
still dating his longtime 
girlfriend, Jenna, played by 
Jacinda Barrett. He 
remains close with his 
three high school friends 
and college friends buddies, 
and they provide him with 
no hope for his own future. 

One is desperately chas- 
ing after a woman who 
broke up with him a long 
time ago. Another is mar- 
ried with a child and is con- 
stantly being put down by 
his wife, and feels as if noth- 
ing he does is good enough. 
He is stressed out and 
wants to end the marriage 
for the good of the child. 
Conveniently enough, 



Michael and Jenna are not 
married, and she finds out 
she is three months preg- 
nant. Michael wonders if his 
fate would be the same as 
his friend's. On the other 
hand, his third friend is a 
bartender who parties con- 
stantly and sleeps with dif- 
ferent women every night. 
Michael views him and 
thinks that he, himself, may 
not have lived life to the 
fullest, and now he really 
can not with a child on the 
way. 

Soon after this, Michael 
and Jenna speak of mar- 
riage. Michael tells Jenna 
he will marry her when she 
can name three couples that 
have been happy together 
for more than five years. 
Jenna responds with, "that 
happy couple at the pond," 
meaning ducks. Michael 
simply says, "ducks don't 
count," and Jenna is clearly 
hurt. At this point, many 
come to dislike the charac- 
ter Michael portrays and he 



is misunderstood. 

At one of Michael's 
friend's weddings, he meets 
Kim, played by Rachel 
Bilson. She is clearly a 
younger girl and comes onto 
him very strong. Viewers 
may be perplexed as to why 
a 19-year-old would want 
something to do with a 29- 
year-old, and why a 29-year- 
old would actually consider 
going along with it. Michael 
begins to feel as if he may be 
having a mid-life crisis at 29 
and ends up agreeing to 
attend a college party with 
Kim — behind his beautiful, 
loving, "everything he could 
ever want," girlfriend, 
Jenna's back. He tries to 
have his friends he for him, 
but nonetheless, Jenna 
finds out. 

From then on, the movie 
traps you into their lives 
and you find yourself want- 
ing to scream at Michael, or 
cry for Jenna. As a viewer, 
you become confused as to 
how people can act so heart- 



So much more than an ugly duckling 



Maria Elena Fernandez 
Los >Ange/es Times 

HOLLYWOOD - You could 
choose to focus on the way 
"Ugly Betty" looks. After all, 
the title of this new ABC 
comedy prods you in that 
direction. But there is some- 
thing more meaningful 
cooking on this series than 
the fact that its star, 
America Ferrera, is hiding 
her beauty under bushy eye- 
brows, braces and a mousy 
wardrobe. 

"Ugly Betty," which cen- 
ters on 22-year-old Betty 
Suarez, a homely college 
grad who grew up in the 
Queens borough of New 
York, has been called both a 
Cinderella story and an 
ugly-duckling, fish-out'of- 
water tale. 

Betty dreams of landing 
a plum job in publishing in 
Manhattan, perhaps at a 
financial magazine, and in 
the pilot, Betty sort of gets 
what she wants: She's hired 
as an assistant to the editor 
of fashion publication Mode. 
It's a "Devil Wears Prada" 
sort of setup that will pit her 
against the pretty people 
and their superficial world. 
And it is the sort of contrast 
that made 'To Soy Betty la 
Fea," the Colombian series 
on which it is based, one of 
the most popular telenove- 
las ever 

But none of that gets at 
what is truly groundbreak- 
ing about "Ugly Betty." 
Woven into Ferrera's role is 
the story of a first- genera- 
tion U.S. Latina straddhng 
cultures, a young woman as 
rooted in her Hispanic 
upbringing as she is in her 
American belief that any- 



thing can be accomplished 
with hard work. 

At home, Betty helps 
her immigrant widowed 
father (Tony Plana) deal 
with his frustrating HMO; 
at work, with her ingenuity, 
she saves her boss (Eric 
Mabius) from losing an 
important client, even 
though he has treated her 
dismissively. 

"I feel it's wonderful 
that this show is not about 
her being a Latina, and 
that's what makes her dif- 
ferent," Ferrera said, who 
starred in "Real Women 
Have Curves" and "The 
Sisterhood of the Traveling 
Pants." "Being an immi- 
grant is one story. But when 
you have family roots in 
another country, but you're 
born and raised as an 
American, that's a whole 
different struggle. Betty is a 
minority in every sense of 
the word: She's a woman, 
she's young, she's Hispanic, 
she's short and not blond 
and not blue-eyed. Yet she's 
got something inside that is 
very reassuring to watch." 

Indeed, by not harping 
on Betty's ethnic back- 
ground but reflecting the 
reality of what it feels Uke to 
grow up as both an insider 
and outsider in two cul- 
tures, never quite fitting 
into either, "Ugly Betty" dis- 
tinguishes itself from other 
shows on broadcast televi- 
sion. 

"Ugly Betty's" creator 
Silvio Horta, a Cuban 
American born in Miami, 
decided his version of the 
popular telenovela would 
work only if it depicted the 
way he grew up. 

"This is my story, living 
at home and switching 



between languages - talk- 
ing to my mother in 
Spanish, talking to my sis- 
ter in Spanglish, and you 
don't even think about it," 
Horta said. "You grow up 
thinking telenovelas are 
cheesy, and yet all the kids 
watched them because that 
is what your parents 
watched, and you got addict- 
ed. Of course, that was 
interspersed with watching 
"Three's Company" and 'The 
A-Team.' I don't think you 
really get it unless you live 
it." 

Ferrera gets it. The 
youngest of six children who 
grew up in Woodland Hills 
with their Honduran moth- 
er, Ferrera was proud of her 
heritage but wanted more 
than anything to fit in with 
her peers. Her mother spoke 
to all the kids (five girls and 
one boy) in Spanish, and 
they spoke to her in English 
because nobody in the 
neighborhood was speaking 
Spanish then. 

"Where I grew up, I 
went to tons of bar and bat 
mitzvahs, and I've never 
been to a single quincean- 
era," Ferrera said. She 
wanted to convert to 
Judaism "because it was the 
cool thing to do. When you 
are first-generation any- 
thing, you have your past, 
which is these roots, and it's 
a part of you because you're 
so deeply connected to your 
relatives. But then you have 
the society that you're sup- 
posed to blend into. You're 
supposed to find friends, 
you're supposed to make a 
life for yourself It's that 
quarrel between how much 
do I compromise on each 
side and still understand 
who I am?" 



Betty may be Mexican 
American, but Horta said 
her Mexican roots would not 
stand out at the beginning 
of the series. 

"Every Latin culture is 
different, but we're trying to 
keep them a Latin family as 
opposed to Mexican, since 
New York has the influences 
of almost every Latin cul- 
ture," Horta said. "We want 
it to be relatable to all 
Latinos and, of course, to 
the general audience as 
well." 

Ferrera, who is bound to 
break out this TV season no 
matter what happens to 
"Ugly Betty" is confident 
that Americans of all back- 
grounds will fall in love with 
Betty even if some critics 
have described the show as 
chauvinistic and the title as 
mean. 

Ferrera thinks the 
media's focus on the term 
"ugly" is hypocritical. 
"People hate the word 
'ugly,'" she said, "and there's 
irony in that, because we 
live in a society where beau- 
ty and image is an obses- 
sion. And by only showing 
and selling one image of 
what 'beautiful' means, we 
are calling everything else 
ugly. To me, I would hope 
that by the middle of the 
first season we have an 
audience who isn't thinking 
about whether she's going to 
undergo a big physical 
transformation. What I love 
the most about her is that 
you're not waiting for her to 
become a swan. You get to 
watch the other people blos- 
som into real human beings 
because she reminds them 
what it is to be real." 



less and if a relationship can 
really forgive certain things. 

Will Jenna really be the 
last girl Michael kisses? Will 
she forgive him for the 
things he has done? Will 
Michael finally feel that 
Jenna is enough for him, 
and that having no surpris- 
es for the rest of his life is 
fine? Go see this well-direct- 
ed movie with a remarkable 
soundtrack to accompany it. 

Overall, I Would give 
this movie four out of five. 
Although it has many twists 
and unexpected events, the 
end is a little predictable. 
Plus, what the ending is 
does not even seem just in 
my eyes. 

At times, I found myself 
so enraged at what Michael 
was doing to Jenna, yet at 
other times, I found myself 
wanting to punch Kim for 
the way she was acting. 
Since she is the same age in 
the movie as I currently am 



1 felt a bit of a connection to 
her. However, I could never 
see myself doing the things 
that she did. 

When everything start- 
ed to come back together, I 
felt relieved. I began to 
think that the movie was 
not at all just a series of 
misfortunate events. In 
addition, the soundtrack is 
well chosen and there is a 
really powerful part of the 
movie where no words are 
said and it is simply just 
scenes with Coldplay's 
"Warning Sign" playing in 
the background. 

Even though some may 
label this as a "chick-flick," I 
attended it with a male and 
he had no trouble sitting 
through it. It speaks the 
universal language of 
heartache. 

Also, the language gets 
to be a little much at times, 
but it is all directed and 
acted out very well. 



The 'Heroes' premiere 
their talents Monday 



Martin iVIiller 
Los Angeles Times 

HOLLYWOOD - You need 
only watch the evening 
news to realize the world is 
in danger. But to find any- 
one who can save it, you 
may have to turn to 
"Heroes," NBC's latest leap 
into serialized storytelling. 

The show, which pre- 
mieres at 9 p.m. eastern 
Monday, chronicles a small 
group of seemingly ordinary 
teens and twentysome- 
things, scattered around the 
globe, who discover they 
possess astonishing traits. 
Some can fly, others can 
move back and forth in time, 
or are indestructible. 

"I think everybody has 
the feeling now that the 
world is becoming a place 



that is overly complicated 
and difficult to figure out - 
global warming, diminish- 
ing resources and terror- 
ism," said Tim Kring, the 
show's creator and executive 
producer "The show's basic 
premise is that nature is 
providing the next evolu- 
tionary rung by populating 
the planet with people who 
are discovering their new 
abilities." 

The hourlong pilot intro- 
duces a stable of angst-rid- 
den characters alternately 
troubled and excited by 
their still well-cloaked pow- 
ers. And it makes a tacit 
promise that they will some- 
how meet someday. 



See "Heroes" contin- 
ued on page 9. 




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Page 9 



TM: CLARION CALL 



September 21. 2006 



Dept. to change admission for upcoming season 



Marilouise Michel 
Chair, Dept. of Theatre 

CLARION. Sept. 21- Like 
many other theatres at sis- 
ter schools in the SSHE 
System, Clarion University 
Theatre has been forced to 
start charging admission to 
students for the 2006-2007 
season. 

Students will be 
charged less than half of the 
price that community mem- 
bers pay to see productions, 
$5 for musicals and $3 for 
plays. Community adult 
prices are $11 for musicals 
and $9 for plays. 

It is with some regret 



that the Department of 
Theatre had to come to this 
decision. University 

Theatre is solely funded by 
the Clarion Student 
Association and the box 
office receipts from produc- 
tions performed on campus. 
For the 2005 - 2006 sea- 
son, the planned production 
of the lavish Rogers and 
Hammerstien musical 

Cinderella had to be post- 
poned because CSA was 
unable to meet the funding 
needs for this production. 
Cinderella is again on the 
season for 2006 - 2007, but 
CSA was unable to fully 
fund the University Theatre 
Season. 



When officers from the 
Student Theatre Advisory 
Council presented their case 
at the budget hearing, it 
was made clear to the 
appropriations committee 
that University Theatre 
would no longer be able to 
offer free tickets to students 
without more funding. They 
said they understood, so we 
are confident that this deci- 
sion has the support of the 
Student Association. 

Theatre is an expensive 
art form and advances in 
technology have lead to 
higher audience expecta- 
tions. It is not unusual for a 
larger school (i.e. Point 
Park, Penn State or Pitt) to 



spend on one production 
what we spend on ten. 

We feel that even if an 
audience member doesn't 
care for a particular play, 
one can never argue with 
the quality of the produc- 
tions. We are not willing to 
lower the quality of our pro- 
ductions, nor do we want to 
produce fewer shows. This 
would be detrimental to the 
community as well as the 
students pursuing degrees 
in theatre who need the pro- 
fessional quality experience 
that the department offers. 

By charging a nominal 
fee, we hope to be able to 
make up the shortfall from 
the CSA appropriation. 



"Sunshine" is better than expected 



Dr. Elisabeth Donate 
Department of Modern 
languages and Cultures 

CLARION, Sept. 18 - 
Believe it or not, when I first 
saw trailers for this film on 
TV, I thought that it was 
some stupid kid movie. I 
had not seen any reviews for 
it, so I had no clue, really, of 
what it was about. I was, 
therefore, rather surprised 
when, maybe a week to ten 
days ago, my daughter 
called me to urge me to see 
this film. Then, an internet 
friend mentioned how good 
it was. Finally, last Friday 
night, a couple of my col- 
leagues told me that they 
had seen Little Miss 
Sunshine, and strongly rec- 
ommended that I see it too. 
So, on Saturday afternoon, 
when it came to a toss-up 
between working or going to 
the movies, you can all 
guess what I picked. 

I have not regretted my 
decision since. And no, this 
is definitely not a kid movie. 

This film is your typical 
road movie, in which driving 
on the great American high- 
way to reach a goal leads to 
the goal becoming meaning- 
less, and the process becom- 
ing an agent of transforma- 
tion. But the road trip does 
not begin immediately. 
Little Miss Sunshine first 
introduces us to Olive, a 
rather mature but sill inno- 



cent seven-year old who is 
totally infatuated with 
beauty pageants and beauty 
queens. After all, for the 
first few minutes of the 
movie, we see her mimick- 
ing to a T Miss Louisiana's 
reaction to her victorj' in the 
Miss American Pageant. 
But, then, the camera cuts 
to her dad, Richard (the, oh, 
so lovely Greg Kinnear), 
who is one loser of a motiva- 
tional speaker. His wife, 
Sheryl (Toni CoUette), is 
coming somewhat unglued, 
especially since she has to 
bring home her brother 
Frank (Steve Carell), the 
world's number one Proust 
scholar, who has just 
attempted suicide because 
he's been fired from his aca- 
demic job after having been 
dumped for the world's 
number two Proust scholar 
by the (male) graduate stu- 
dent with whom he was hav- 
ing an affair. 

Never mind that 
Richard and Sheryl's other 
child, the 15-year old, 
Nietzsche-obsessed Dwayne 
(Paul Dano), who hates 
everybody, and whose eyes 
hide behind dark, shaggy 
bangs, has not spoken in 
nine month, and has 
vouched not to do so until he 
reaches his goal of entering 
the Air Force Academy and 
of piloting jet planes. And 
then there is the heroin- 
snorting grandpa (the best 
character, superbly por- 



trayed by Alan Arkin), 
whose drug habit and bla- 
tant philandering led him to 
be kicked out of the retire- 
ment community where he 
lived. Grandpa is a man who 
truly feels that, at his age, 
he cannot afford not to do 
drugs. 

We soon learn - at the 
dinner table, around the 
bucket of fried chicken meal 
that Sheryl serves, it seems, 
daily - that Olive has been 
training big time for a beau- 
ty pageant and that grand- 
pa is her coach (and you are 
in for a treat when you get 
to see the dance routine that 
he taught his granddaugh- 
ter!). Olive also learns then 
that her uncle Frank was in 
love with a boy, which she 
finds quite "silly," and that 
he tried to kill himself 
because of that boy. It is also 
then that we learn that 
Olive has qualified for the 
Little Miss Sunshine 
Pageant in Redondo Beach, 
California. The whole family 
will be taking her there 
from Albuquerque in its 
decrepit VW van. 

And just as it is a 
repeated family effort to 
push the van each time it 
needs to get started 
(because the transmission is 
somewhat busted), getting 
Olive to Redondo Beach and 
the Little Miss Sunshine 
Pageant is an undertaking 
that will lead (force might 
actually be a better word) 



each family member to 
reevaluate his or her life, 
and his or her relationship 
with others. Olive turns out 
to be the glue that puts the 
family together, but not in 
any kind of maudlin fash- 
ion, not in a traditional way. 
Needless to say that there is 
also a not-so subtle indict- 
ment of kids' pageants - 
with their dolled-up, Jon 
Bennet Ramsey look-alikes, 
and their organizers. 
Members of a same family - 
as dysfunctional as it may 
seem to be or as it really is - 
just cannot afford to hate, or 
even temporarily not like 
each other. What helps us go 
on, and get beyond the 
obstacles that life throws at 
us is the love and loyalty 
that we have for and toward 
each other because we are 
family. Beauty pageants are 
only mirages. The love of a 
husband for his wife, of a 
brother for his sister, of a 
sister for her brother, of par- 
ents for their children, of 
children for their parents, of 
a grandfather to his grand- 
child, and of his grandchild 
for him form the core of our 
most genuine reality. 

This is not a movie that 
is so hilariously funny that 
it will make you fall of your 
seat. Rather, it will make 
you chuckle at times, and be 
deeply moved at others. It is 
very well done ■ very nicely 
written and directed, and 
the cast is superb. 



Connection in ''Six Degrees" is similar to TV sliows 



Robert Lloyd 

Los Angeles Times 

HOLLYWOOD-Coincidence 
is the engine that drives 
drama, which otherwise 
would too much resemble 
the way we actually live. 

A book might last for 
20,000 pages, a movie may 
go on for six weeks before 
something interesting hap- 
pens, some little bit of 
serendipity that makes the 
hair on the back of your 
neck stand up. 

Collision and re-colli- 
sion. It can look like fate or 
like an accident, depending 
on how your philosophy 
inclines, but life would be 
less fun without it, and TV 
even worse. 

Coincidence is at the 
very heart of "Six Degrees," 
a new series from ABC pre- 
miering Thursday night 
that takes its name from the 
"six degrees of separation" 
theory, which holds that you 
can connect any two people 



through a chain of six other 
people (and sometimes less, 
obviously, unless you want 
to take the scenic route). 

It's odd, in a way, to see 
this show coming along now, 
years after John Guare's 
1990 play "Six Degrees of 
Separation" (and its movie 
version, which came out 
slightly later) planted the 
concept firmly in the pop 
culture. 

But in the way it brings 
strangers together and 
explores the idea of connec- 
tion, it has a lot in common 
with a number other shows 
this season, including "The 
Nine" and "The Class," and 
also with "Lost," whose co- 
creator J.J. Abrams is an 
executive producer here. 

New York is where our 
story unfolds, the naked city 
of eight million stories and 
the metropolis of happen- 
stance nonpareil, because 
people there are continually 
moving about on its side- 
walks and bumping up 
against one another on its 



subways. 

Certainly, you couldn't 
set that show in Los 
Angeles, where people move 
from house-pod, to car-pod, 
to work-pod, possibly stop- 
ping off at coffee-pod along 
the way, and tend to see the 
same few faces day in and 
day out. 

New York also offers the 
gift of its locations, which 
are used abundantly and 
give the show a sense of 
reality its script does not 
always earn (The actors 
take up the rest of the 
slack.). 

Essentially a rarefied 
soap opera, it has something 
of the feel - notwithstand- 
ing some fisticuffs and a bit 
of gunplay -- of what used to 
be called a "woman's pic- 
ture,"in which every sleeve 
has a heart on it and a 
handkerchief might be 
called for every 20 minutes 
or so. 

The show might as well 
be called "Six Characters in 
Search of Each Other." 



When not meeting out- 
right, they pass one another 
on the street or the subway, 
sit in the same bars; it is a 
cute concept and sort of fun 
spotting them as they go by, 
like an Alfred Hitchcock 
cameo - for a while, any- 
way. 

I suppose they ultimate- 
ly will all be on a first-name 
basis, but for now there are 
a few degrees of separation 
yet to go. 

The show has an excel- 
lent cast, topped off with a 
bit of indie cred in the form 
of Hope Davis ("About 
Schmidt"), as widowed 
mother Laura, and 
Campbell Scott ("Roger 
Dodger"), as formerly suc- 
cessful, now sober art pho- 
tographer Steve. 

As in a novel by Charles 
Dickens, that past master of 
coincidence, the characters 
represent a variety of back- 
grounds and classes, though 

I think that's just for 
color here, rather than any 
kind of social comment. 



Free Alcohol Screenings. 



Alcohol and your life: Where do you draw the line? 



Monday, OcXxyber 1, 2006 
ChcmMerVOnCn^HM 10:30 cum - 2:30 p.nu 



Drinking: 

What can you lose? 



The Department of 
Theatre certainly under- 
stands that CSA has many, 
many organizations vying 
for funding every year, and 
hope that this will be an 
acceptable compromise for 
all. 

To put it in perspective, 
tickets still cost less than a 
movie. I think that students 
will find that our produc- 
tions are of similar or higher 
quality to those offered at 
larger schools and regional 
theatres. 

On the bright side - stu- 
dents can earn vouchers for 
free tickets by working on 
the scenery or costumes for 
a particular show. They can 



call X2709 or just come by 
the theatre and talk to 
Professor Ed Powers who be 
overseeing the vouchers. 

It is our sincere hope 
that Clarion students will 
continue to support 
University Theatre, and be 
proud of the quality per- 
formances that are avail- 
able to them at such a 
reduced rate. 

When you graduate, 
you'll probably pay $25 - $65 
dollars to see performances 
of similar quality, so come 
on out to the theatre and 
enjoy your discounts while 
you're here! 



Nicholas Sparks and how 
he made me a True Believer 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_seclent@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 21 - I will 
admit first and foremost 
that I am indeed a junkie... 
a Nicholas Sparks junkie 
that is. Yes, it's true, I read 
his novels religiously. "True 
Believer," however, was dif- 
ferent to me; it stuck out of 
the crowd. 

Jeremy Marsh, a jour- 
nalist, spends his time trav- 
eling around investigating 
supernatural activities and 
figuring out why they are 
occurring (he just finished 
proving that a man who 
nationally claimed to be psy- 
chic, was in fact not at all). 
He is contacted by a woman 
named Doris McClellan, 
who ironically is the psychic 
of her hometown (meaning 
she can tell the gender of 
unborn babies), regarding 
strange lights that have 
been happening in her local 
cemetery. Thus begins the 
inevitable trip to Boone 
Creek, North Carolina. 

Being a New Yorker, 
Marsh has never actually 
experienced small town life, 
but he gets his fair share 
during his stay in Boone 
Creek. On his first visit to 
the cemetery, he encounters 
a beautiful woman who baf- 
fles him and stops him in 
his tracks. He dwells on this 
woman, but then places her 
in the back of his mind in 
order to accomplish what he 
came to do. 

His investigation 

requires him to do a lot of 
research, which takes him 
to the town library. When he 
enters the library, he sees 
the beautiful woman again 
and realizes that she works 
there. The woman, Lexie 
Darnell, turns out to be the 
granddaughter of 

McClellan, the woman who 
initially contacted him. 

The relationship 

between Marsh and Darnell 
starts out very rocky, but 
after spending every day 
there, Marsh begins to grow 



on Darnell. His obsession 
with her is ridiculous, con- 
sidering she shows absolute- 
ly no interest in him at first. 
We find out later that 
Darnell does in fact believe 
in these lights, or ghosts, 
because she thinks that her 
deceased parents have come 
to her in cemetery in the 
form of these lights. 

Marsh and Darnell 
never realized that their 
meeting would be a life- 
changing occurrence, as 
most of the relationships are 
in Sparks books. Of course, 
complications arise here and 
there, but the ending is 
always a happy one, that 
seems to always make me 
cry. 

The reason that this 
book particularly stuck out 
to me was because it was 
unlike any of Sparks other 
books, but similar in the 
same way. "True Believer" 
focuses more on the mystery 
of the cemetery than the 
relationship between Marsh 
and Darnell, which is noth- 
ing like any other Sparks 
novel. The climax of this 
story is when Marsh discov- 
ers the truth behind the 
lights, instead of anything 
having to do with the rela- 
tionship. 

Overall, I really liked 
this novel. I would give it a 
four out of five. But for those 
readers who have yet to 
experience a Sparks (I will 
take insanity or illiteracy as 
an excuse in that case), this 
is not his typical work. I'd 
recommend to those Sparks 
virgins something along the 
lines of "The Notebook," 
which in my perspective is a 
classic, or "Nights in 
Rodanthe." 

Also to add to the list, 
Sparks did indeed come out 
with a sequel to "True 
Believers," which I have 
actually purchased but have 
not had the time to read. "At 
First Sight" tells the story 
about Marsh and Darnell 
after they are married and 
are expecting their first 
child. 



"Heroes" continued from 
page 8. 

Making a character fly, say, 
or spontaneously regenerate 
a mangled hand requires a 
fair amount of special 
effects. So does creating the 
illusion that parts of the 
show were shot in Tokyo, 
New York and London, 
though all the filming was 
in Los Angeles. But don't 
expect the show to be a 
weekly special-effects fest. 
"We can't compete with a 
$200 million feature film," 
Kring said. "We're going to 
use them sparingly." 

"Heroes" has been com- 
pared to "X-Men," which 



centers on genetic mutants 
who develop superhuman 
powers shortly after puber- 
ty, but Kring said the show 
was actually inspired by 
Pixar's "The Incredibles" 
and Charlie Kaufman's 
"Eternal Sunshine of the 
Spotless Mind." 

At the show's heart, he 
explained, is answering the 
question everyone faces. "I 
really liked the idea of tak- 
ing these Kafkaesque hyper- 
anonymous characters and 
infusing them with special 
abilities and have them deal 
with the existential mean- 
ing of their lives " to figure 
out what is their purpose. 
It's something all people can 
tap into." 



Page 10 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



September 21. 2006 



tlissitieis 



(ireek \k Travd Einplojinent For Mi Persoils, anil lieDerdl ids 




Happy 21st Birthday Jenna 
and Maria! 

V Your AZ Sisters 

Happy 23rd Birthday 
Walker, and 22nd Birthday 
Endler! 

V AZ 

CJood Luck to everyone run- 
ning for homecoming court! 
1» Your AZ 

Alpha Sigma Tau, next time 
you have a bon-fire in your 
kitchen call us! 
- KAll 



^m 




('(line IIUH'I 



fhr 



Ambassadors every 1st & 
3rd Wednesday of the 
month. 6 p.m. at the Alumni 
Association Building. 

Interested in earning com- 
munity service hours? Join 
the fun-filled Clarion Dance 
Marathon by dancing or 
joining one of the eight com- 
mittees. For more informa- 
tion contact cdm4chil- 
dren@hotmail.com 

2 Students looking for 1 stu- 
dent to share apt.- 5 min. 
from CUP. Each has own 
BR. Low rent. Available for 
Fall and Spring Semesters. 



814-745-2215. cell 221-0480 
or 814-764-3754. 

FIZZ! FOCUS! FUEL 
GOOD with LIFT-OFF! 
NEW Effervescent Energy 
Drink Fight fatigue ~ 
Improve Mental 

Performance. Contact SAN- 
DRA AMATO Local 
Herbalife Independent 
Distributor (814) 764-3446 
www.getliftoffnow.com/ 
samato. 

Beautiful blue like-new elec- 
tric guitar for sale. Includes 
lOw. amp, case, electric 
tuner and more. Contact 
8_sdkurtz(!a)clarion.edu 

Brand new TV show for 
WCUB-TV 

A new series for the campus 
television station is being 
developed, and we are look- 
ing for writers, actors, and 
tech crew. This show is 
going to be a sketch comedy 
series, similar to SNL. If 
you are interested, or would 
like more information, 
please email Tom 

McMeekin, WCUB 

Production Manager, at 
s_tjmcmeekin@clarion.edu. 
For other information about 
WCUB-TV, contact Station 
Manager Dan Rinkus at 
s_dprinkus@clarion.edu 




One bedroom apt. fully fur- 
nished. Available Fall 2006- 



Spring 2007. Accomodates 
1-2. Call Patty at 814-745- 
3121 or 814-229-1683. www. 
lakenapartments.com 

Two Bedroom apt. Fully fur- 
nished. Available Fall 2006- 
Spring 2007. Call Patty at 
814-745-3121 or 814-229- 
1683. www. lakenapart- 
ments.com 

A selection of houses and 
apts. available for Fall 2006- 
Spring 2007. Some close to 
campus. Fully furnished. 
Accomodations from 1-8 
people. Call Patty at 814- 
745-3121 or 814-229-1683. 
www. Iakenapartraents.com 

Room in Victorian Home 
close to University, reason- 
abe, includes all utilities & 
cable. Available Fall & 
Spring. Call 814-226-5442 
or after 1 p.m. 814-226- 
5651. 

Serious Students! Are you 
looking for a FREE PLACE 
to live? Do you like horses? 
We offer free room and 
board in our home for occa- 
sional chores and house sit- 
ting. 7 miles from campus. 
Call Gwen at 814- 379-3759 
or gwwills@pennswoods.net 

House for rent, with five 
bedrooms/2-baths for five 
students. Available for 
spring and fall 2007 and 
spring 2008. Washer, Dryer, 
Stove and Refrigerator 



included, off street parking, 
$1050.00 per semester per 
student + utilities. Call 814- 
226-8185 and leave a mes- 
sage. 




Travel with STS to this 
year's top 10 Spring Break 
Destinations! Best deals 
guaranteed! Highest rep 
commissions. Visit 

www.ststravel.com or call 1- 
800-648-4849. Great Group 
Discounts. 




Congratulations to the 
newly elected officers for 
PRSSA! 2006-2007! 

Hey roomies, fun times and 
road trips taking place this 
year! 

Next game Steelers are 
gonna win! 

A shout out to my girls! 
- pinky 

Alisha, 
GREYS! 

-Amy 

Yeah blue balls! SAC! 

Dom, 

Do your homework slacker. 

-Amy 

Goal Tonight: u p.m. 



Mary Walter Leadership Devdopnent Series 

Fall 2006 ' In the Gemmeli Student Complex at 7-8 pm 

Sponsored by the Office of Campus Life 
Questions can be directed to Student Coordinator Ashley Walker at MWLeadership@clanon.edu 



5? 



Session!; Wed Oct. 4 

"Missed Opportunities 
Room 250-252 



Session 4; Wed. Oct. 25 

"Getting Involved Within 

Your College Community" 

Room 250-252 



tosion 2: Wed« Oct 11 

"Abandon the Path and Leave a Trail" 
Room 250-252 



Session 5: Wed. Nov. 1 



Session 3; Wed. Oct 18 

"Going the Extra Mile: 

A Parable of Success" 

Room 146 

Session 6: Tne. Nov. 7 

"Choosing to Be Champions in Life" "Why Does It Matter Now?' 
Room 250-252 Room 250-252 

Session 7; Wed. Nov. 15 

"Benefits of Being Involved" 
Room 250-252 




IKIE or 



IME YEAR 



Take The Clarion Call "Rookie of the Year^ Quiz! 
by Bryan Bingham 

1.) The Cubs owner told Jack that he would make what 
percent of Henry's profits? 

a. 15% c. 50% 

b. 10% d. 35% 

2.) One of Henry's best friends is named George, what 
is the other's name? 

a. John c. Clark 

b. Andy d. Jim 

3.) Brickmans number is? 

a. 43 c. 

b. 60 , d. 23 

4.) What soda company sponsors Henry? 

a. Coca-Cola c. Pepsi 

b. Sprite d. Dr. Pepper 

5.) How many people did John Candy say were attend- 
ing the first game of the season? 

a. 205 . c. 100 

b. 300 d. 1000 



6.) Henry's coach told him to throw when he first 

got on the mound? 

a. the stinky cheese c. strikes 

b. the heat d. at the batter 

7.) WTiat was the first team Henry pitched to? 

a. Mets c. Giants 

b. Phillies d. Mariners 

8.) The Cubs tried to trade Henry to the? 

a. Marlins c. Yankees 

b. Tigers d. Braves 

9.) Henrys last major league pitch was a? 

a. change-up c. home run 

b. fast ball d. floater 

10.) In the beginning Henry played what position on his 
little league team? 

a. catcher c. outfield 

b. pitcher d. second base 

3 COX P ("6 3 ("8 B CL q ("9 q ('9 3 Ct- B (8 3 {Z q ("I :SJ8MSUB 



Aye Aye Captain Tay Tay. 
-Amy 

~LC- 

When it's painful... just sing 

"The Song"... 

^ Me 

Dearest Mikeypooh, 
You complicate my life. 
-Amy 

Confusious says, 

No eat roommate's pizza 

and leave empty box in 

fridge. 

Hi Brian. 

- Kathy 

Tangula! 

- Brian 

I love all my Bigs. 

V your little Jamie Beebe 

Carissa, 
I love you. 

- Mike 

The world is a wonderful 
place. 

- Mike 

Happy 22nd Birthday Tom. 
I'll make you a cake when I 
have time I promise. 

- Tina 

Goal Tonight: 11 p.m. 

Chelsey, 

Way to show up. 

-Us 

Blazin' Buffalo, 



I can't wait to have some 
kiasables and cake with you 
this weekend. I hope you 
like it. See you soon. 
ff Fiery Habanero 

The Call misses Dan 
Edington. Stop in more 
often. 

Mr. Anderson, 

The atmosphere has been 
legs profane since you left. 
Groping and harassment no 
longer exist, it's quite nice. 

- Little me 

Get me a screwdriver now! I 
need to unscrew it to see 
what kind of light bulb it 
takes. 

- Pumpkin 

Amy, 

I'm going to the coat room to 

make out, don't eat my 

chicken. 

t-dub, 

you are a cute aUigator! 

If g*star 

BK, 

Spill coffee on anyone in the 

middle of class lately? 

If your fabulous roommate 

Shannon & Chris, 
Happy 5 months! 

- Steph 

Sarah belle- 
Dinner date- Don't Forget. 
Love you! 
V B 




Check 

hack 

next 

week for 

the 

answer! 




September 21. 2006 



THE CLARION CALL 



PageJl 



Tennis team goes undefeated on 
three day, three game road trip 



Michael Waterloo 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

S_mrwaterloo@clarion.edu 

CMRION, Sept. 19 - After 
a rough start losing to St. 
Vincent College in the sea- 
son opener, the Clarion girls' 
Tennis team volleyed back 
to their winning ways. With 
three games in three days, 
the team was away at West 
Chester and Kutztown and 
home against University of 
Sciences-Philadelphia. 

They defeated West 
Chester and Kutztown 8-1 
and University of Sciences- 
Philadelphia 6-1 respective- 
ly. The doubles teams of 
Kristen flack/Corin Rom- 



bach. Amy Robertson/Lisa 
Baumgartner and Megan 
Robertson/Brittany 
Bovalino. were astounding 
winning all their matches 
for the three days. 

"Winning all of our 
matches this weekend really 
meant a lot to us. It was a 
huge confidence boost after 
losing the opener to St. 
Vincent," Senior Co-Captain 
Kristen Jack said. Megan 
Robertson put forth a terrif- 
ic effort by winning all of the 
matches she took part in, 
Jack added. 

The team is now concen- 
trated on their match today 
against Millersville. "Our 
keys to victory are to play 
smart and don't get discour- 



aged," Jack stated. The 
team still has some key sec- 
tional matches left includ- 
ing California, one of the top 
teams. Jack has a good out- 
look for the season though. 
"I feel we will come out with 
a winning record. We have 
a very deep team that is 
very talented, so I'm not 
worried at all." 

Three people get to 
attend the individual tour- 
nament at Bloomsburg. 
After taking seventh place 
in regionals last year, the 
team hopes the individuals 
that attend will be able to 
exceed that ranking. 




Photo Courtesy of Tennis Coach Lorl Sabatose 
Road Warriors - The Clarion University Tennis team went 30 this past weekend on a road trip to 
West Chester and Kutztown. From left to right Kristen Jack, Megan Robertson, Lisa Baumgartner, 
Amy Robertson, Brittany Bovalino, Corin Rombach and Mary Loveless. 



Lions are making a mess of 
IVIike IVIartz's offensive system 



Dan Pompei 
Washington Post 



Asking the Lions to exe- 
cute Mike Martz's offense 
might seem like asking a 
bunch of butchers to per- 
form brain surgery. And so 
far, well, let's just say they 
have made quite a mess on 
their aprons. 

At issue is whether the 
Lions have the players who 
can operate this system, 
which historically puts up 
points as if the game were 
pinball instead of football. 
After two games, it's safe to 
say not all of these players 
fit the offense. 

No player can have suc- 
cess working for Martz if he 
doesn't have a high football 
I.Q., which makes sense 
given Martz's football I.Q. is 
higher than the aggregate 
weight of his offensive Une. 
Martz is known for having 
dramatically different game 
plans from week to week. 
They are voluminous and he 
sometimes calls plays that 
are not even in that week's 
game plan. He likes to chal- 
lenge his players mentally 
because he believes it keeps 
them fresh. 

And there are other special 
requirements for positions 
in this offense. 

Martz's quarterbacks 
have to be accurate, and 
they have to be accurate 
pronto; that means making 
fast decisions and having a 
quick release are important. 
Kurt Warner, who has com- 
pleted 65.6 of his passes in 



his NFL career, is the proto- 
type for this system. 

A Martz quarterback 
also has to be tough, on mul- 
tiple levels. He's going to 
take some hits in an attack 
that tries to stretch the 
field, so he has to be 
durable. He also has to be 
mentally strong enough to 
not be crushed by Martz, 
who demands precision. 

Jon Kitna, who came 
into the season with a 58.8 
percent career completion 
rate, is accurate enough, 
tough enough and smart 
enough to play for Martz. 
His release could be quicker 
and he does not have the 
strongest arm, but Martz 
can win with a quarterback 
such as Kitna. 

Kevin Jones is different 
from Marshall Faulk, but he 
has all the skills to be a Pro 
Bowl player in this system. 

A back like Faulk, who 
enhances the passing game, 
is the best fit for this 
offense. First and foremost, 
that means the back has to 
have the intelligence, tough- 
ness and technique to be 
able to pass-block. He also 
should be able to run routes 
efficiently and catch the 
ball. Running style is sec- 
ondary. 

"They can be big, they 
can be little, they can be 
fast, they can be slow, just 
as long as they can beat a 
corner one-on-one," Martz 
says. "If you can't do that, 
you can't play." 

Martz's receivers also 
are required to run more 
than most and disciplined 
route running is a necessity. 



The Lions don't have the 
type of receivers Martz 
needs and this has been 
their most glaring problem 
so far. Roy Williams has the 
ability to excel in any sys- 
tem, but he has not tapped 
into his talent consistently. 
Mike Williams hasn't shown 
any fire. The others arc 
average Joes. 

If Martz doesn't have 
two tackles who can pass 
protect he almost needs two 
left tackles this system 
won't hit on all cylinders. 

The system calls for 
having as many players 
running routes as possible. 
That means Martz prefers 
to leave his tackles without 
a lot of help. Pass protection 
killed the Lions in their 34- 
7 loss to the Bears last 
Sunday, when they gave up 
six sacks. 

Detroit probably needs 
some upgrades on the line, 
but it's early to pass judg- 
ment on this unit because 
two starters have missed 
time. 

At least Martz has vet- 
erans. Young linemen could 
struggle in this offense 
because he can use close to 
20 protections in a game, 
and blockers have to be able 
to adjust to the defensive 
changes caused by all the 
pre-snap motioning Martz 
uses with his skill position 
players. 

So far, it appears that 
what Martz needs to run his 
offense and what he has are 
not entirely the same thing. 



Padres' GM Kevin Towers takes shots at former catciier IVIirabelli 



David Heuschkel 
Washington Post 

BOSTON - Doug MirabelU 
was supposed to be a savior, 
at least according to a sign a 
Red Sox fan held up May 1 
at Fenway Park. 

There is another sign on 
the bulletin board in manag- 
er Terry Francona's office 
from that night that reads, 
"Welcome Home Mirabelli." 

That brings to mind 
what could be the worst 
trade made by Red Sox gen- 
eral manager Theo Epstein, 



a deal he may regret for 
years and one that could lift 
the Padres into the postsea- 
son. 

The May 1 trade that 
brought Mirabelli back to 
Boston in exchange for 
switch-hitting catcher Josh 
Bard and rookie reliever Cla 
Meredith became a topic of 
conversation Tuesday. And 
not because Epstein was 
fleeced by his former boss. 
Padres GM Kevin Towers, 
for the second time in as 
many years. 

Towers blasted Mira- 
belli in Tuesday's San Diego 



Union-Tribune, portraying 
him as a malcontent in his 
brief time in San Diego. 

"I don't miss him. These 
guys don't miss him," 
Towers said. 

Towers said Mirabelli, a 
backup most of his career, 
was upset when the Padres 
signed Cooperstown-bound 
catcher Mike Piazza 
because it would cut into his 
playing time. Mirabelli dis- 
puted that, saying he was 
upset at his agent, who also 
represents Piazza. 

"They trade for me and 
I'm going to be the guy that 



goes in there and gets a lot 
of playing time," Mirabelli 
said. "Then they sign Piazza 
and then I realize that I'm 
not going to get a lot of play- 
ing time. That changes the 
whole situation of why I'm 
there. If I'm going to be a 
backup catcher, which is 
what I am, I wanted to be 
here with (Jason) Varitek 
and these guys that I've 
known for a long time, in my 
comfort zone." 

Varitek, who read the 
story, said Mirabelli is "the 
exact opposite" of what 
Towers said. 



"I would think that (the 
Padres) have other fish to 
fry right now," Varitek said. 
According to Towers, 
Mirabelli once said he could- 
n't play because he was so 
intent on playing for the 
Red Sox after talking to 
some of his former team- 
mates. 

"I said, 'You're catching 
today. Theo ain't paying you. 
I'm paying you,'" Towers 
said. "Then in the worst 
way, I wanted to trade him 
to the Yankees. In the worst 



way 



Mirabelli was upset that 



a private conversation he 
had with Towers was pub- 
licly revealed. 

"If he could do it to me, 
he could do it to anybody," 
Mirabelli said. "Why do you 
have a closed-door conversa- 
tion? If you wanted it in 
public, you would just say it 
out in the clubhouse or you 
would just say it publicly. 
It's always known that air- 
ing your laundry in the 
media is not good business. 
For some reason, he chose 
Doug Mirabelli as a guy that 
he really has strong ill-will 
feelings toward." 






Flag Football Results 



9/19/6 






YGFT 


Free Bailers 


53-5 


Dirty Sth Boyz 


Get Em Boyz 


36-€i 


Just Ball 


GameTlrne 


39-11 


Dudes we Cant 


Little Giarits 


9D-9 


Mac Attack 


Nuphies 


56-22 


Dynast/ 


The Pitts 


F 


Dynasty 


YGFT 


33-15 


Cheefe 


Click-Clack 


35-20 


Crazy Joe Rog, 


Wait 4 It 


48-0 


Flag Football Playe 


rs 



interested in playing in a 
7 on 7 Regional Tournament? 

Contact Doug Knepp for more into, 

Field Goal Contest 

lues. 9/2 6 at 6pm at the stadium 

Please park in the Main Lot, 

DO NOT park beside the 

stadium. 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intrarrural, Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393-1667 



GOLF SCRAMBLE 

Monday, 9/2S or Tuesday, 9/26 

Clarion Oaks Countty Oub 

Register your team (up to 4 players) 
at the Rec center, then call the 
course at 226-8838 to reserve a tee 
time. This is an 18 hole best ball 
scramble. Students golf for /s price- 
111.50, Cart INCLUDED, 

(Please follow all course policies.) 
To qualify for the IM prize you must 
turn your completed scorecard into 
the IntJ'amural office by YV'ednesday, 
9.'27 by noon. In case of a tie, a 
scorecard playoff will be used. 

CLUB SPORTS UPDATE: 
Ultimate Frisbee and 
Equestrian 

Clubs are now forming. 
Check the REC Center for more details, 
I Pitch Softball Tournament 

SATURDAY. OCTOBER 14^ 
COST $20 PER TEAM 

CLARION COUNTr PARK 
Tourney will be limited to the fir^t 12 
teams to register by 10/12 and pay the 
fee. This is a Co-Rec Tournament and 
all njles are posted at the REC Center, 




9/2 1. '06 




Volleyball Results 



9/19/6 






Teeeaaanrnm 


Colb. Stare 21-18,21-15 


Spike Anyv^^here 


Hartnian 21-18,21-18 


Team Sex App, 


Pink Flam 21-11,21-17 


9/1 3'6 






Off in Shower 


Delta 2eta2 1-14, 21 


-13 


Down to Business 


TheCont 216,21- 


15 


Down to Business 


Team Sig. Forfeit 




9/12/6 






Brusin' Blues 


Fly Itches 25-23,25-11 


Ligej^ 


AT's2l-l3,2l-9 




at Night 


Atf^ Chill III 21-8,21 


-14 


Dodgeball Results 




9/19/6 






Ave. Joe's Gym 


TheB.A.M.Fs 


20 


Team Ramrod 


The Rtts 


F 


Girl Set Trp. 419 Big Bois 


20 


Trash Monkeys 


The n. W.O 


20 


9/ 13' 6 






The n.W.o 


The Pitts 


F 


Trash Monkeys 


Satan's 


20 


Dynasty 


Team Ramrod 


20 


Ave. Joe's Gym 


Big Bois 


20 


9/12/6 






The B.AM.Fs 


The Pitts 


20 


Girl Set Troop 419 Gritynasty 


2-1 


Purple Cobras 


Delta Zeta 


F 


Gritynasty 


Ave joe's Gym 


20 



United Way S K Run 

Saturday, 9,' 30 9:00 a.m. 

Kick off the Autumn Leaf festivities with 
a 5K road race to benefit the United 
Way, For more info - stop by the Rec 
Center, or call 226-8760, All pre- 
registered racers will receive a long 
sleeve T-shirt and food provided by 
Sheetz, Special cost is |I2 for all CUP 
students. In addition, Incamurals will 
reimburse half the cost for CUP students 
that turn in a request after the race. 
Race day registration starts at 7:30am 
and ends at 8:45am. The road race 
begins at the corner of Main St and 2*^ 
Ave, and ends on the CUP track. Cash 
prizes and awards to v%finners of various 
divisions! 

Intramarah on the Web 
clarion.edu/intramurals 

Or from the CUP home page: 
Click on Athletici then Intnmurali. 

Find out details about t^tr^ sport including 
rules, roster limitations, schedules and 
results. See your teami in action with new 
pictures posted ever;.' week. 
''REGISTER Of4-UNE" 
E-Mail questions / comments 



Page 10 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



SlmitMs 



September 21. 2006 



liri'ck Ills, Tiiivii fjiipliiiiiinil. Fur Itcnl, hmuk iind lieneml Ids 




lla|jpy 21:^t Birthday Jenna 

and Maria! 

^ Nniir \/ Sisters 

Ha|)[)y 2:>rd Birtluiay 
Walkfi-. and 22nd Birthdav 
h:ndier! 
^ \Z 

( !<<()d Iak k to everyone run- 
ning For homecoming court! 
V Voui' \/ 

Alpha Siijiiia Tau. next time 
>ou have a hon-fire in your 
kitchen call iisl 
- K\II 

fiEIIERAL 

'mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 
Come mopt the Ha^de 
.\tni)as-ad(iis exi'ry l.st & 
•Srd Wediie.-^day of the 
month. () p.m. at the Alumni 
.Association Building. 

Interested in earning com- 
munity service hours? Join 
the fun-filled Clarion Dance 
Marathon by dancing or 
joining one of the eight com- 
mittees. For more informa- 
tion contact cdm Ichil- 
dren" hot mail.com 

2 Students looking for 1 stu- 
dent to share apt.- 5 min. 
from CUP. Each has own 
liH Low rent. .Available for 
Fall and Spring Semesters. 



Hi l-7ir)-22ir), cell 22 1-0 180 
or8]4-7H4-8754. 

FIZZ! FOCUS' FUFL 
(JOOI) with LIFT-OFF' 
NKW Effervescent Energy 
Drink Fight fatigue 
Improve Mental 

Performance. Contact SAN- 
DRA AMATO Local 
Herbalife Independent 
Distributor (814) 764-H446 
www.getliftoffnow.com/ 
samato. 

Beautiful blue like-new elec- 
tric guitar for sale. Includes 
lOw. amp. case, electric 
tuner and more. Contact 
ssdkurtz" clarion.edu 

Brand new lA' show for 
VVCUB-TV 

.\ new series for the campus 
television station is being 
developed, and we are look- 
ing for writers, actors, and 
tech crew. This show is 
going to be a sketch comedy 
series, similar to SNL. If 
you are interested, or would 
like more information, 
please email Tom 

McMeekin, WCUB 

Production Manager, at 
s_tjmcmcekin(fl/clarion.edu. 
For other information about 
W(TJB-TV. contact Station 
Manager Dan Rinkus at 
s_dprinkus(f')clarion.edu 



PtW8£NT 



«mmmm 



One bedroom apt. fully fur- 
nished. Available Fall 2006- 



Spring 2007. Accomodates 
1-2. Call Patty at 814-74rr 
:il21 orH14-229-1683. www. 
lakenapartnients com 

Two Bedroom apt. Fully fur- 
nished. .Available Fall 2006- 
Spring 2007. Call Patty at 
H14-745-3I21 or cS14-229- 
1683. www. lakenapart- 
ment.s.com 

A selection of houses and 
apts. available for Fall 200tr 
Spring 2007. Some close to 
campus. Fully furnished. 
Accomodations from 1-8 
people. Call Patty at 814- 
745-3121 or 814-229-1683. 
www. lakenapartments.com 

Room m Victorian Home 
close to University, reason- 
abe, includes all utilities & 
cable. .Available Fall & 
Spring. Call 814-226-5442 
or after 1 p.m. 814-226- 
5651. 

Serious StudentsI Are you 
looking for a FREE PMCE 
to live? Do you Uke horses? 
We offer free room and 
board in our home for occa- 
sional chores and house sit- 
ting. 7 miles from campus. 
Call Gwen at 814- 379-3759 
or gwwills 'tpennswoods.net 

House for rent, with five 
bedrooms/2-baths for five 
students. Available for 
spring and fall 2007 and 
spring 2008. Washer, Dryer. 
Stove and Refrigerator 



included, off street parking. 
$1050.00 p(M- .semester per 
student + utilities. Call 814- 
226-8185 and leave a nies 
sage. 



Travel with 8TS to this 
year's top 10 Spring Break 
Destinations! liest deals 
guaranteed! Highest rep 
commissions. Visit 

www.ststravel.com or call 1 • 
800-648-4849. Great Group 
Discounts. 

Congratulations to the 
newly elected officers for 
PRSSA! 2()06-2007' 

Hey roomies, fun times and 
road trips taking place this 



Next game Steelers are 
gonna win! 

A shout out to my girls! 

- pinky 

Alisha, 
GREYS! 

- Amy 

Yeah blue balls! SAC! 

Dom, 

Do your homework slacker. 

- Amy 

Goal Tonight: 11 p.m. 



.Ave Aye Captain Tay Tay. 
.Amy 

LC 
When It's painful... just sing 
'The Song"... 
V .Me 

Dearest Mikeypooh, 
You complicate my life. 
.Amy 

Confusions says. 

No eat roommate's pizza 

and leave empty box in 

fridge. 

Hi Brian. 
Kathy 

Tangula! 
Brian 

I love all my Bigs. 

V your little -lamie Beebe 

Carissa, 
I love vou. 
- Mike 

The world is a wonderful 

place. 

- Mike 

Happy 22nd Birthday Tom. 
I'll make you a cake when I 
have time I promise. 
Tina 

Goal Tonight: 11 p.m. 

Chelsey, 

Way to show up. 

-Us 

Blazin' Buffalo, 



I can't wait to have some 
kissables and cake with you 
this weekend. I hope you 
like it. See you soon. 
^ Fiery Habanero 

The Call misses Dan 
Edington. Stop in more 
often. 

Mr. Anderson, 

The atmosphere has been 
less profane since you left. 
Groping and harassment no 
longer exist, it's quite nice. 

- Little me 

Get me a screwdriver now! I 
need to unscrew it to see 
what kind of light bulb it 
takes. 

- Pumpkin 

Amy, 

I'm going to the coat room to 

make out, don't eat my 

chicken. 

t-dub, 

you are a cute alligator! 

1^ g*star 

BK, 

Spill coffee on anyone in the 

middle of class lately? 

V your fabulous roommate 

Shannon & Chris, 
Happy 5 months! 
- Steph 

Sarah belle- 
Dinner date- Don't Forget. 
Love you! 
^ B 



Mary Walter Leadership Development Series 

Fall 2006 - In the Gemmell Student Complex at 7-8 pm 

Sponsored by the Office of Campus Life 
Questions can be directed to Student Coordinator Ashley Walker at MWLeadership@clarion.edu 



Session 1 ; Wed. Oct. 4 

"MLssed Opportunities" 
Room 250-252 



Session 4; Wed. Oct. 25 

"Getting Involved Within 

Your College Community" 

Room 250-252 



Session 2: Wed. Oct. n 



Session 3: Wed. Oct. 18 



"Abandon the Path and Leave a Trail" "Going the Extra Mile: 
Room 250-252 A Parable of Success" 

Room 146 



Session 5: Wed. Nov. I 



Session 6: Tue. Nov. 7 



"Choosing to Be Champions in Life" "Why Does It Matter Now?'' 
Room 250-252 Room 250-252 

Session?: Wed. Nov. 15 

"Benefits of Being Involved" 
Room 250-252 




OK III; 01 



Take The Clarion Call "Rookie of the Year" Quiz! 
by Bryan Bingham 

1.) The Tubs owner told Jack that he would make what 
pciccnt of Henry's profits? 

■>■ I''"" c. 50% 



1). ]()"() 



d. 35% 



6.) Henry's coach told him to throw 

got on the mound? 

a. the stinky cheese c. strikes 

b. the heat d. at the batter 



2.) One of Henry's best friends is named George, what 

is the other's name? 

a. John c.-Clark 

''■ Andy d. Jim 



■ i.) Brickman's number is? 

a. i:> c, 

I) 60 d. 2.i 

1.) What soda company sponsors Henry? 
a. ("oca-Cola c. Pepsi 

h. Sprite d. Dr. Pepper 

5.) How many people did John Candy say were attend- 
ing the first game of the .season? 
^1 205 c. 100 

b. 300 d. 1000 



7.) What was the first team Henry pitched to? 

a. Mets c. Giants 

b. Phillies d. Mariners 

8.) The Cubs tried to trade Henry to the? 

a. Marlins c. Yankees 

b. Tigers d. Braves 

9.) Henrys last major league pitch was a? 

a. change-up c. home run 

b. fast ball d, floater 

10.) In the beginning Henry played what position on his 
little league team? 

a. catcher c. outfield 

b. pitcher d. second base 

3 (01 P Ce ^ ('8 B (7. q CB q C9 •' V\ « Cl' o C? q Ci :SjaMsuK 




when he first 







September 21. 2006 



Tennis team goes undefeated on 
three day, three game road trip 



TTffi CLARION CALL 



Page 11 



Michael Waterloo 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s mrwaterloo@clarion.edu 

CL.AKION. Sept. 10 After 
a rough start losing to St. 
Vincent College in the .sea- 
son opener, the Clarion girls' 
Tennis team volleyed back 
to their winning ways. With 
three games in three days. 
the team was away at West 
Chester and Kutztown and 
home against Uni\'ersity of 
Sciences- Philadelphia. 

They defeated West 
Chester and Kutztown 8-1 
and University of Sciences- 
Philadelphia fi-l respective- 
ly. The doubles teams of 
Kristen Jack/Corin Rom- 



bach. .\iii\ RobertHon/Lisa 
Haumgartner and Megan 
K o b e r t s o n / B r i 1 1 a n >■ 
nova lino, were astounding 
winning all their matches 
for the three days. 

"Winning all of our 
matches this weekend really 
meant a lot to us. It was a 
huge confidence boost after 
losing the opener to St. 
Vincent," Senior Co-Captain 
Kristen Jack said. Megan 
Robertson put forth a terrif- 
ic effort by winning all of the 
matches she took part in, 
f.'ack added. 

The team is now concen- 
trated on their match today 
against Millersville. "Our 
keys to victory are to play 
smart and don't get di.'^cour 



aged." Jack stated. The 
team still has some key sec- 
tional matches left includ- 
ing California, one of the top 
tennis. Jack has a good out- 
look for the season though. 
"I feel we will come out with 
a winning record, We have 
a very deep team that is 
\('iy talented, so I'm not 
worried at all." 

Three people get to 
attend the individual tour- 
nament at Bloomsburg. 
After taking seventh place 
in regionals last year, the 
team hopes the individuals 
that attend will be able to 
exceed that ranking. 



Lions are making a mess of 
Mike IVIartz's offensive system 




Photo Courtesy of Tennis Coach Lori Sabatose 
Road Warriors - The Clarion University Tennis team went 3-0 this past weekend on a road trip to 
West Chester and Kutztown. From left to right Kristen Jack. Megan Robertson. Lisa Baumgartner, 
Amy Robertson, Brittany Bovalino. Corin Rombach and Mary Loveless. 



Dan Pom pel 
Washington Post 



Asking the Lions to onc 
cute Mike Martz's offen.se 
might seem like asking a 
buiu'h of butchers to per- 
form brain surgery. .And sn 
far, well, let's just say they 
have made quite a mess on 
their aprons. 

At issue is whether the 
Lions have the players who 
can ojierate this system, 
which historically puts up 
points as if the game were 
pinball instead of football. 
After two games, it's saf<' to 
say not all of these players 
fit the offense. 

No player can have suc- 
cess working for Martz if he 
doesn't have a high football 
I.Q., which makes sense 
given Martz's football l.Q. i.s 
higher than the aggregate 
weight of his offensive line. 
Martz is known for having 
dramatically different game 
plans from week to week. 
They are voluminous and he 
.sometimes calls plays that 
are not even in that week's 
game plan. He likes to chal- 
lenge his players mentally 
becau.se he believes it keeps 
them fresh. 

And there are other special 
requirements for positions 
in this offense. 

Martz's quarterbacks 
have to be accurate, and 
they have to be accurate 
pronto; that means making 
fast decisions and having a 
quick release are important. 
Kurt Warner, who has com- 
pleted 65.6 of his passes in 



his NI'L career, is the proto- 
type for this system. 

A Martz quarterback 
also has to be tough, on mul- 
tiple levels. He's going to 
take .some hits in an attack 
that tries to stretch the 
field, so he has to be 
durable. He also has to be 
mentally strong enough to 
not be crushed by Martz, 
who demands precision, 

Jon Kitna, who came 
into the season with a nH.H 
percent career completion 
rate, is accurate enough, 
tough enough and smart 
enough to play for Martz. 
His release could be quicker 
and he does not have the 
strongest arm, but Martz 
can win with a quarterback 
such as Kitna. 

Kevin -Jones is different 
from Marshall Faulk, but he 
has all the skills to be a Pro 
Howl player in this system. 

A back like Faulk, who 
enhances the passing game, 
is the best fit for this 
offen.se. First and foremost, 
that means the back has to 
have the intelligence, tough- 
ness and technique to In- 
able to pass-block. 111' .ilso 
should be able to run routes 
efficiently and catch the 
ball. Running style is sec- 
ondary. 

"They can be big, they 
can be little, they can be 
fast, they can be slow, just 
as long as they can beat a 
corner one-on-one." Martz 
says. "If you can't do that, 
you can't play." 

Martz's receivers also 
are required to run more 
than most and disciplined 
route running is a necessity. 



The Lions don't have the 
type of receivers Martz 
needs and this has been 
their most glaring problem 
so far. Hoy Williams has the 
ability lo cxicl in .'in\ sys- 
tem, but he has not tapped 
into his talent consistently 
Mike Williams hasn't shown 
any fire, The others an' 
average Joes, 

If Martz doesn't have 
two tackles who can pass 
protect he altnost needs two 
left tackles this system 
won't hit on all cylinders. 

The svsf(>m calls for 
having,; .i- many players 
running routes as possible. 
That means Martz prefers 
to leave his tackles without 
a lot of help. Pass protection 
killed the Lions in their ;M- 
7 loss to the Bears last 
Sunday, when they gav(> up 
six sacks. 

Detroit probably needs 
some upgrades on the line, 
but it's early to pass judg- 
ment on this unit becau.se 
two starters have missed 
time. 

At least Martz has vet- 
erans. Young linemen could 
sti-ui^i;l(' in this offense 
because he can use close to 
20 protections in a game, 
and blockers have to be able 
to adjust to the defensive 
changes caused by all the 
pre-snap motioning Martz 
uses with his skill position 
players. 

So far, it appears that 
what Martz needs to run his 
offense and what he has are 
not entirely the same thing. 



Padres' GIVI Kevin Towers tal<es sliots at former catclier iVIirabelli 



David Heuschkel 
Wastiington Post 

BOSTON - Doug Mirabelli 
was supposed to be a savior. 
at least according to a sign a 
Red Sox fan held up May 1 
at Fenway Park. 

There is another sign on 
the bulletin board in manag- 
er Terry Francona's office 
from that night that reads, 
"Welcome Home Mirabelli." 

That brings to mind 
what could be the worst 
trade made by Red Sox gen- 
eral manager Theo Epstein, 



a deal he may regret for 
years and one that could lift 
the Padres into the postsea- 
son. 

The May 1 trade that 
brought Mirabelli back to 
Boston in exchange for 
switch-hitting catcher Josh 
Bard and rookie reliever Cla 
Meredith became a topic of 
conversation 1\iesday, And 
not because Kpstein was 
fleeced by his former boss. 
Padres GM Kevin Towers, 
for the second time in as 
many years. 

Towers blasted Mira- 
belli in T\iesday's San Diego 



Union-Tribune, portraying 
him as a malcontent in his 
brief time in San Diego. 

"I don't miss him. These 
guys don't miss him," 
Towers said. 

Towers said Mirabelli, a 
backup most of his career, 
was upset when the P;ulres 
signed Cooperstown-bound 
catcher Mike Piazza 
because it would cut into his 
playing time. Mirabelli dis- 
puted that, saying he was 
upset at his agent, who also 
represents Piazza. 

"They trade for me and 
I'm going to be the guy that 



goes in there and gets a lot 
of playing time," Mirabelli 
said. "Then they sign Piazza 
and then 1 realize that I'm 
not going to get a lot of play- 
ing time. That changes the 
whole situation of why I'm 
there. If I'm going to be a 
backup catcher, which is 
what I am. I wanted to be 
here with (Jason) Varitek 
and these guys that I've 
known for a long time, in my 
comfort zone." 

Varitek. who read the 
story, said Mirabelli is "the 
exact opposite" of what 
Towers said. 



"I would think that (the 
Padres) have other fish to 
fry right now." Varitek said. 
According to Towers, 
Mirabelli once said he could- 
n't play becau.se he was so 
intent on playing for the 
Red Sox after talking to 
some of his former team- 
mates, 

"I said, 'You're catching 
today, Theo ain't paying you, 
I'm paying you.'" Towers 
said. "Then in the worst 
way, I wanted to trade him 
to the Yankees. In the worst 
way. " 

Mirabelli was upset that 



a private conversation he 
had with Towers was pub- 
licly re\'ealed. 

"If he could do it to me, 
he could do it to anybody," 
Mirabelli said. "Why do you 
have a closed-door conversa- 
tion? If you wanted it in 
public, you would just say it 
out in the clubhouse or you 
would just say it publicly. 
It's always known that air- 
ing your laundry in the 
media is not good business. 
For some reason, he chose 
Doug Mirabelli as a guy that 
he leally has strong ill-will 
feelings toward," 





ROI\iTl/\C 

/\CIS 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Dou;? Kfiepp - lritr.irr«jr.il, Recre-ition, ':< Cluh Sport Directur 3'.?:!- 1 667 



f/nonnco Ifc 



t Mi 



Flag Football Results 



'?/l9V6 






YGFT 


Free Ballet-s 


53-5 


Ditt/ Sth Boyz 


Get Em Boyz 


36 -fl 


Just Ball 


Game Time 


3'MI 


Dudei" we Ci/'it 


Little Giaj-its 


50-'^ 


MacAtt-icl.. 


Nuphies 


56-22 


Dynasty 


The Pitts 


F 


Dyri-isty 


YGFT 


33- 15 


Cheets 


Click-Clack 


35-20 



Crazy Joe Rog. Wait 4 It 



48 -t) 



Flag Football Players 

interested in playinj in a 
7 on 7 Regional Tournament? 

Contact Dou;? Knepp for more into, 

Field Goal Contest 

Tues. '?'/26 at 6pm at the stadium 

Pieas€ park in the Main Lot, 

DO NOT park beside the 

stadium. 



GOLF SCRAMBLE 

Monday, %'2S or Tuesday. 9/26 

Clarion Oaks Country Club 

Register your te;im (up to 4 players) 
at the r'.ec center, then call the 
course at ^'i'b-uttit' to reserve a tee 
time. This IS an IS hole best ball 
scramble. Students :?,olt tor '.'n price- 
I'll.SO. Cart INCLUDED, 

I. Fiease tollovv all course policies,) 
To qualify tor the IM prize you nriust 
turri your completed scorecard into 
the InD'aiTiural office by Wednesday, 
y.''2/ by noon, In case of a tie, a 
scorecard playoff will be used. 

CLUB SPORTS UPDATE: 
Ultimate Frisbee and 
Equestrian 

Clubs are now forming. 
Check the FiEC Center for more details. 
I Pitch Softball Tournament 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14"^ 
CO':.T$20PERTEAM 

CLARIOfg COUf^JTr PARK 
Tourney will be limnted to the fir'st 12 
tearre to register by 10/12 aj'id pay the 
tee. This IS a Co -Pec Tournament and 
all njles are posted at the REC Center, 




'?/2IA)b 




Volleyball Results 

T e e e aaarrrnrn C o I b . Stare 21-18,21-15 

Spike Anywtiere Haftmari 2 1-18, 2 I -18 

T e am S e< App , F'l n k F I ami 21-11,21-17 

9/1:3' 6 

Off in Showe r- Delta Zeta 21-14,21-13 

Dcv/n to 6u;ir,e>; The Cont. 2 I -8, 2 I -1 5 

Down no Bujine;;': Team 'Mg. Forleit 

9/12/6 

B r us I n ' B I u es F ly Itc h es 2 5 -2 3, 2 5 - 1 1 

Ligers AT'5 2l-l3,2l-9 

at Niitit .A.tj', aiiiiiii 2 M3, 21-14 

Dodgeball Results 

9/1'?/ 6 



Ave. Joe's Gym TheB.A.M.Fs 

Team F'.amrod The Rtts 

Girl Set. Ttp, 419 Big Bois 
Trash Monkevs Then.VV.O 



20 
F 

2-0 
2 V 

The n.'vV.o The Pitts F 

Trash f"1 on keys Sat-i/Vs 20 

Dynasty Team Ramrod 2<i 

Ave. joe's Gyrn Big Bois 



9/1 3'6 



2-0 



9/12/6 



The B.AM.Fs 



The Pitts 



G I rl Set T ro o p 4 1 9 G rity n,ist;,' 

Purple Cobras 

Gritynastv 



2Ci 
2-1 
Delta Zeta F 

Ave Joe's Gvm 2-'0 



United Way 5 K Run 

Saturday. 9'30 9:00 a.m. 

Kick off the ,Autumn Le-it festivities with 
a Sf( road race to benefit the United 
VVay, For more into - stop bv the Pec 
Center, or call 226-8760, All pre- 
registered racers will receive a Ion? 
sleeve T-shirt and food provided by 
bheetz, 'I'peciai cost is '|->l2 for all CUP 
students, In addition, lnt}"amurals will 
reimburse half the cost for CLiP students 
that turn in a request after the race, 
F'ace day registratiori starts at 7:-jOiiT\ 
and ends at b:45ami, The road race 
begins at the corner of f lairi 'jt arid 2"^ 
Ave. and ends on the CIJP track. Cash 
prizes and awards to winners of various 
divisions! 

Intromurah on the Web 
clarion.edu/intramurals 

Or from the CUP home page: 
Click on Athletics then IntramuraJi. 

Find out details about every sport including 
r'ules, roster limitations, schedules and 
r'esults. See your team in action vvith new 
pictures posted ever*/ week. 
"REGISTER ON-LINE" 
E-Mail questions / comments 



Page 12 



Tm CLARION CALL 



September 21. 2006 



Sftrts 



Todaj: Fiiotbiiil (Imps km opener Gull (« wins Hal Hansen 



Football falls to West Chester in home opener 



Chris Parks 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

8_cspar(<s®clarion.edu 

CLARION. Sept. 16 - After 
losing their first two games 
on the road to Tiffin and 
Kutztown, the Golden Eagle 
Football team was looking 
forward to returning to 
Memorial Stadium in front 
of their fans. 

Things looked promis- 
ing in the first half, but 
West Chester scored 22 
unanswered points in the 
second half and Clarion fell 
49-21. This was the most 
points that Clarion has 
given up in a game since 
last year's homecoming 
game where they lost to 
East Stroudsburg 56-0. 

Clarion jumped out to 
an early 14-6 lead on a 64 
yard touchdown pass from 
freshman quarterback Mark 
Rupert to receiver Pierre 
Odom with about nine min- 
utes remaining in the quar- 
ter. But West Chester went 
on to score the next 21 
points in the first and sec- 
ond quarters. Brent 
Steinmetz had a two yard 
touchdown run to give the 
Rams a 14 to 13 lead, then 
running back Osagie 
Osunde ran in a two yard 
touchdown of his own and 
then caught a 15 yard 
touchdown pass from Matt 
Brudalski to give the Rams 
a 27-14 advantage. Clarion 
struck once more before the 
end of the first half when 




always been very good at 
Clarion and this year is no 
exception, they have only 
given up three sacks all year 
long. Coach Foster also 
pointed out some key play- 
ers that have Clarion fans 
excited entering PSAC West 
play in 2 weeks. 

"Eddie Emanuel, Jim 
Simmons and Mark 
Foradora at tight end has 
added a nice dimension, and 
have about a dozen 



we 



Mike Cauvel/r/ie Clarion Call 
Kickoff - West Chester traveled to Clarion on Saturday and spoiled the Golden Eagle's home open- 
er. Clarion lost to West Chester 49-21. Next up for the Golden Eagles is a trip to Bloon)sburg this 
Saturday to face the number nine ranked team in the Division II poll. 



Matt Foradora caught a 
seven yard touchdown pass 
from Rupert who threw for 
302 yards and two touch- 
downs. Clarion Head Coach 
Jay Foster continues to like 
what he sees out of Rupert. 

"Mark is getting better 
each week," he stated, and 
his statistics have proved it. 

The second half 
belonged to West Chester as 



they scored all 22 points, 
including Dean Millard 
touchdown runs of 65 yards 
and one yard. The Ram 
defense did not give in one 
bit as West Chester got their 
first victory of the season 
improving to 1-2. 

Even though the score 
may have been lopsided, the 
Golden Eagles had a ton of 
high points in this game. 



Odom had a career day 
with 246 yards receiving on 
six catches and Coach 
Foster was very happy 
about that, but he stressed 
consistency. 

"Obviously, Pierre had a 
tremendous game last 
Saturday, but we need that 
consistency from him on a 
weekly basis," he said. 

The offensive line has 



freshmen who have been 
thrown into the fray and 
have responded very well." 

But on the flipside of 
things, a 0-3 record was not 
the vision Clarion had in 
mind to open the 2006 sea- 
son. Defensively the team 
needs to be stronger and 
Foster could see that in the 
West Chester game. 

"We plan on working on 
our tackhng on defense after 
the performance versus 
WCU," Foster said. 

So expect the Golden 
Eagles to get a good workout 
from the coaching staff this 
week as they prepare for 
Bloomsburg on the road this 
coming Saturday at noon. 
The Huskies went 11-1 last 
season which helped them 
earn the number nine spot 
in the Division H preseason 
poll which they still hold 
after jumping out to a 2-1 
start this season. It will be 
another test for the new 
look Golden Eagles and 
Coach Jay Foster. 



Golf team wins Hal Hansen Invitational 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s_ekbowser@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 18 - The 
Golden Eagles Golf team 
took advantage of playing 
on their home course this 
weekend and finished first 
out of 15 teams in the Hal 
Hansen Invitational held at 
Clarion Oaks Golf Club. 

Clarion finished with a 
total of 584 (-1-8) to beat out 
Concord University by one 
stroke in the two day event. 
Ohio Valley University fin- 
ished in third place, six 
shots off the pace set by the 
Golden Eagles. 

"Playing on your home 
course is always an advan- 
tage, but teams do not 
always take advantage," 
Coach Al Lefevre said. 
"This time we did." 

The Golden Eagles were 
led to victory by senior 
Justin Scott and junior 
Justin Moose. Both Scott 
and Moose finished at 2- 
under par 142 for the two 
day event and were tied 
with Concord's Darcy 
Donaldson and Jesse 
Hiddleston for the individ- 
ual lead. Scott defeated 
Donaldson on the second 
playoff hole to take medalist 
honors. 

"Everyone performed 
well and Justin Scott and 
Justin Moose had a great 
tournament, but we are 
always looking to improve." 
Lefevre said. 

Scott shot a 5-under par 
67 on Sunday, the first day 
of the event. "Justin had 
one of the best tournaments 
in the history of the school." 
Lefevre said. 

The 5-under par round 
tied the low round in 
Clarion University histor>' 



held by Anthony Tacconelli 
who set the record in 2000 
and Matt Guyton who did it 
twice in 2002. On Monday, 
Scott was named the PSAC 
golfer of the week. 

Thanks in part to Scott's 
low round, the Golden 
Eagles set another school 
mark on Sunday. The team 
collectively shot a 5-under 
par 283 which bested the old 
mark of 2-under par set in 
2002. The Golden Eagles 
had five members of the 
team in the top 20 of the 
final individual standings 
for the event. 

Clarion took advantage 
of its only home match on 
the fall schedule. The 
Golden Eagles will hit the 
road this week for the 
Wheeling Jesuit 

Invitational on Monday and 
Tuesday which will be held 
at Moundsville Country 




Mike Cauvel/Tfte Clarion Call 
Get in the hole - The Clarion University Golf team finished first in the Hal l-lansen Invitational held 
at Clarion Oaks Golf Club. Next up for the Golden Eagles is the Wheeling Jesuit Invitational. 



Club. The Golden Eagles 
finished in fourth place at 
the event last year which 
was won by Concord. 







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Sports Briefs 




Sports briefs courtesy of 
Sports hformatlon 



Scott named PSAC 
golfer of the week 

Clarion University 
senior Justin Scott is the 
PSAC Golfer of the Week. 

Scott won medalist 
honors in a playoff at the 
Hal Hansen Invitational, 
which was hosted by the 
Golden Eagles at Clarion 
Oaks Golf Club. His vic- 
tory helped propel 
Clarion to the tea title at 
the two-day event. 

Scott shot a two- day 
total 2-under par 142 
and then won the playoff 
on the second hole. He 
also registered the low 
round of the tournament, 
a 67, on the opening day. 
The 5-under par first 
round tied a school 
record. 



Gentile reaches 1,500 
career digs 




Vicky Gentile 



Clarion University 
junior Vicky Gentile, a 
member of the women's 
volleyball team, become 
the second player in 
school history to reach 
1,500 career digs when 
she bad 14 digs vs. Lock 
Haven Tuesday. 

Gentile now has 
1,513 career digs and is 
second in school history 
behind Melanie Bull's 
2,000 career digs. 

This season, she 
leads the PSAC in digs 
per game (6.03) and has 
235 digs. She is the 
school-record holder for 
digs in a season (711 in 
2004) and also had the 
fourth most digs in a sea- 
son in Clarion history 
when she recorded 567 in 
2005. 

Gentile was a 2004 
second-team Daktronics 
Division H Volleyball All- 
Atlantic Region team 
member as a freshman. 

Clarion is 8-4 overall 
and 0-3 in the PSAC 
West this season. The 
Golden Eagles have won 
20 or more games for a 
school record five 
straight seasons and 
made appearances in the 
NCAA Division H play- 
offs in 2002, 2003 and 
2004 while also qualify- 
ing for the PSAC Playoffs 
in 2004. Clarion returns 
to action this weekend at 
the PSAC Crossovers at 
Lock Haven. 





Golf wins Wheeling Jesuit 

Invitational see sports page 12 




One copy free 




ECL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 




CALL 



Volume 93 Issue 3 



September 28, 2006 







3.1 Poat News Service 




fU<, 



liospitai B^ at near 
tewklf^ point 

WASHINGTON 
Kmcrgei at 

many h^pitais are rou* 
tinely »tretchcrf i 
breaking point, 
ncems that thty 
able to handle victims^ 
uring a terrorist attack 
natural d4»a»ter, 
ccording to conpessiojii; 

testimony Wedne 

;nd a new federal stu^ 

Between 40 pern 

land 50 percent of e 

wency departments expe* 

fenced crowding during 

2003 and 2004, the study. 

by the Centers for 

Disease Control and 

Prevention found. 

It deemed an em&r 
gencyroomtobecimrded. 
if m many patients flood- 
ed in that ambulance* 
had to be diverted to 
other hospitals, or people' 
in ui^ent need of care 
had to wait an average of 
more than an hour, or at 
least three percent of 
patients simply gave up 
and left befor » n« mg 



* 



Wmx of pact on 
! F^Mstan's trfbai 

ona uf^ertaln m 
PAKISTAN - Three 
weeks after Pakistan's 
preeident, Gen. Pervez 
Musharraf, announcrMi a 
peace pact with Taliban 
radicals in a tribal ai^a 
bordering Afghanistan, 
rwent visitors say there 
is now pin-drop silence in 
a territory that once 
shook with artillej^' ami 
bomb blasts, and that 
religious patrols are 

Knforcing law and order 
a place of Pakistan army 
troops who have with- 
drawn to their barracks. 
But as the toil of vio' 
lenTO rises across the bosr 
der, with suicide bomb 
ings killing 22 peoples 
three Afghan cities 
week, there are renorta 
that militant Pak 
tribal leadeire, whil 
plying with their pieage 
reduce the presence of 
rmgn Islamic fighters, 
tend to defy the peace 
act by sending more 
local Taliban suppr>»'t*>'-e 
into Afghanistan 
insttrgents and s 
bombers. 

Rlaor^a arrets four 
ru^tanofflMfsoa 

GEOHGIA - Geon 
Arreets Four Ruas: 
Officers on Sp 
CharBes Russian mil 




hefw demaiidmg tha 





College Republicans revamp club 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bekoebler®clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 27 - The 
Clarion University College 
Republicans elected new 
leaders and will hold a 
meeting on Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. 
in room 204 of Founder's 
Hall. 

The College 

Republicans originated in 
2003 and have started off 
this semester with new 
leadership. 

Newly elected College 
Republican President, Mike 
Armstrong, has given the 
campus group an aggressive 
agenda for the upcoming 
year. 

Currently, the club 
boasts the largest member- 
ship of any political organi- 
zation on campus. 

"Since the beginning of 
the fall semester, our mem- 
bership has grown from less 
then 10 to nearly 80 mem- 
bers," said Armstrong. 

College Republican sec- 




Provided by Greg Mortimer 
College Republicans- (L-R) President Micheal Armstrong, Vice-President l\/latthew Petruna, 
Secretary Anna Welsh, Treasurer Valerie Heigel, and advisor, Barry Sweet. 



retary, Anna Welsh said, "I 
became involved in the 
College Republicans after 
the now-president, Michael 
Armstrong informed me 
that he wanted to re-vamp 
the already existing club 



and really try and make it 
more influential around 
campus." 

The most recent addi- 
tion to the executive board 
of the organization is the 
webmaster, Dan Kelosky. 



Armstrong has assigned 
the group's members to a 
variety of new committees, 
including: campaigns and 
activism, special events, 
banquets, fundraising and 
budgeting. 



"We're very pleased to 
see the enthusiasm and 
hard work ... we hope to 
integrate many of these stu- 
dent volunteers into our 
county Republican activities 
also," said Clarion County 
GOP Chairman, Greg 
Mortimer. 

"We are planning a mul- 
titude of activities this 
semester," said Vice- 
President, Matthew 
Petruna. "We will have a 
float in the A.L.F. parade." 

The College 

Republicans hosted College 
Republicans Rock Concert 
in the Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room on Sept. 24 
and will work on various 
campaign events, a fall ban- 
quet, a "Rock the Vote" 
event, with the Young 
Democrats organization and 
possibly a campaign event 
featuring U.S. Sen. Rick 
Santorum. 

See "FACULTY" 
continued on page 2. 



Faculty senate to select deans 




Adam Mohney 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ajmohney®clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 25 - On 
Sept. 25 the CUP Faculty 
Senate met in Hart Chapel 
and approved search com- 
mittees that will select a 
dean for the College of Arts 
and Sciences and the 
College of Education and 
Human Services. 

The proposed slate for 
the search committee, which 
will select a new dean for 
the College of Arts and 
Sciences includes Beth 
Jackson and Dana Madison, 
Mathematics; Sharon 

Montgomery, Physics! 

Uraina Pack, English; 
Eleanor ter Horst, Modern 
Languages; Joe Thomas, 
Art. Jackson will represent 
Venango campus. 

The proposed search 



committee for selecting a 
dean for the College of 
Education and Human 
Services will include 
Jonathan Brown and Sonja 
Heeter, Education; William 
Buchanan, Library Science; 
Young-Gyoung Kim and 
Shari Wynkoop, Special 
Education; Mary-Pat 

McCarthy, Communication 
Sciences and Disorders. 
Wynkoop will represent 
Venango Campus. 

President Joseph 

Grunenwald commended 
the Committee on 

Committee and Rules (CCR) 
for their selections for the 
proposed search commit- 
tees. "CCR did an excellent 
job selecting these search 
committees. There is great 
minority representation on 
the proposed slates," he 
said. 

Dr. Todd Pfannestiel, 
Chair of the Faculty Senate, 
sees the approval of the pro- 
posed committees as the 
most important thing the 
Senate covered on Monday. 
'These are two very impor- 
tant searches for the univer- 



sity community, especially 
with regard to academic 
affairs," he said. 

The proposed commit- 
tees will now go to President 
Grunenwald for his final 
approval. "After [President 
Grunenwald's] approval, the 
search committees will meet 
and begin the process of hir- 
ing the two new deans," 
Pfannestiel said. 

Grunenwald announced 
the final enrollment totals 
for the Fall 2006 freeze date 
in his president's report. 
Undergraduate enrollment 
was 6,951, up from 6,581 at 
the beginning of the semes- 
ter. Graduate enrollment 
had also increased to 664, 
up from 656 at the begin- 
ning of the semester. 

The budget for the 2006- 
2007 school year was also 
approved by the Council of 
Trustees, according to 
Grunenwald. He said the 
budget deficit is just under 
$2 million, which is signifi- 
cantly less than it was last 
year. Budget planning for 
the 2007-2008 school year 
will begin within the next 



month, as approximated by 
Grunenwald. 

Grunenwald also 

announced plans to poten- 
tially hire a web marketeer 
at the university. "This 
would be a content person, 
not a technology person, 
who would strive to make 
our website more user 
friendly," he said. 

Grunenwald said inten- 
tions of purchasing new hir- 
ing software for CUP were 
also underway. Grunenwald 
said a committee will be 
selected to review and ana- 
lyze several different types 
of software. He also added 
the software would be used 
for hiring all occupations at 
the university. 

Junior, Joshua Pierce, a 
student senator, issued the 
Student Senate report. 
Pierce announced that 
freshman elections will take 
place within the next few 
weeks. Pierce also 

added that the annual 
Safety Walk, which was held 
Sept. 21 was successful. He 
said the Student Senate will 
begin planning Casino 



Night, which will take place 
in December. 

Dr. Jamie Phillips 
announced Student Affairs 
will meet this week for the 
first time to elect their first 
chair. Phillips was also 
announced as chair of the 
General Education depart- 
ment for this school year. 

Dr. Patricia Kolencik, 
chair of Faculty Affairs, 
announced Robert Nulph 
was elected as chair of the 
Technology Department for 
the 2006-2007 school year. 

Dr. David Lott offered 
the Venango report. He 
announced that the commit- 
tee search for a new director 
of the School of Nursing has 
been approved. The search 
will begin on Oct. 1. 

CCR, Academic 

Standards, the Budget, and 
Faculty Affairs all offered no 
report. 

Pfannestiel hopes to 
make CUP a better univer- 
sity for students while he is 
the chair of the Faculty 
Senate. 

See "FACULTY" 
continued on page 2. 



Nationally ranked debate team begins season 



Shaklra O'Neil 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_soneil@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 27 - The 
Clarion University Debate 
Team began their season on 
Sept. 20 at the King's 
Tournament in Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. 

The champion Debate 
Team has ranked fourth in 
the Nation for two consecu- 
tive years. 

The team consists of 25- 
40 students with some of 
them being new to campus. 

The topic for this year 
debate is "Resolved: The 
U.S. Supreme Court Should 
Overrule One or More of 
These Decisions^ Planned 
Parenthood vs. Casey, 
Morrison vs. United States, 
Milliken vs. Bradley, and 
Exparte Quirin vs. United 
States." 

Topics for debate are 



chosen by the American 
Debate Association. 

The teams debating on 
the topics spend time on 
both the negative and affir- 
mative sides of the topic. 

The team consists of 
four levels of competition. 
Varsity, which implies that 
you have extensive back- 
ground with several years of 
debating experience; Junior 
Varsity, which implies that 
you have two or more years 
of experience with place- 
ment at two or more tourna- 
ments; and Novice, which 
are debaters in their first 
year of competition. 

The most important 
goal for the Debate Team is 
to continue to do well and 
rank nationally. This year 
the Debate Team had a 
$1,500 donation that they 
will be using to provide 
scholarships to team mem- 
bers. 



With this first time 
scholarship money, there is 
a hope that promising high 
school debaters will come 



sists of members^ Bill 
Dummett, a senior microbi- 
ology major; Kelly Goodrich, 
a senior political science 



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Photo courtesy of the Newswire 
Chamf^on debaters - (L-R) Bill Dummett, Jessica Zezulewicz 

forward. major; Rob Noerr, a senior 

The debate team con- speech communication 



major; Taylor Hahn, a sen- 
ior anthropology major; 
Ryan Adamiak, a sophomore 
political science major; Dave 
Durney, a junior philosophy 
major; Tom Toner, a fresh- 
man secondary education 
earth and space science 
major; Emily Brytus, a 
freshman art major; 
Heather Morrow, a senior 
early childhood education 
major; Emannuel Jones, a 
junior speech communica- 
tion major; Brad Kapp, a 
freshman accounting major; 
Megan Shewell, a freshman 
secondary education 

English major; Matt Tenney, 
a sophomore • sociology 
major; and Mary Loveless, a 
freshman political science 
major. 

Novice debater, Jones 
said "I see why we are 
nationally ranked," said 
Jones, "It's intimidating to 
be on the team." 



Pafle 12 



THE CLAKION CALL 



September 21. 2006 



Sf9rtS 



Tiiilin : Fiiiil liiill ilnips liiiiiie \]\wm M \m\\ m Hal Hansen 



Football falls to West Chester in home opener 



Chris Parks 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

S_cspaiks@clarion,edii 

CLARION. Sept. 16 .Mtti 
losing tht'ir first two i^arnes 
on the road to Tiffin aiul 
Kutztown, the (lolden Kagle 
Football team was looking 
forward to returning to 
Memorial Stadium in front 
of their fans. 

Things looked promis- 
ing in the first half, hut 
West Chester scored 22 
unanswered points in the 
second half and Clarion fell 
49-21. This was the most 
points that C^larion has 
given up in a game since 
last year's homecoming 
game where they lost to 
East Stroudshurg n&O. 

Clarion jumped out to 
an early 11-6 lead on a M 
yard touchdown pass from 
freshman quarterback Mark 
Rupert to receixcr Pierre 
Odom with about nine min- 
utes remaining in the quar- 
ter. But West Chester went 
on to score the next 21 
points in the first and sec- 
ond quarters. Brent 
Steinmetz had a two yard 
touchdown run to give the 
Rams a 14 to 13 lead, then 
running back Osagie 
Osunde ran in a two yard 
touchdown of his own and 
then caught a 13 yard 
touchdown pass from Matt 
Brudalski to give the Hams 
a 27-14 advantage. Clarion 
struck once more before the 
end of the first half when 




Mike Cauvel/rfte Clarion Call 
Kickoff • West Chester traveled to Clarion on Saturday and spoiled the Golden Eagle's home open- 
er. Clarion lost to West Chester 49-21. Next up for the Golden Eagles is a trip to Bloomsburg this 
Saturday to face the number nine ranked team in the Division II poll. 



Matt F'oradora caught a 
seven yard touchdown pass 
from Rupert who threw for 
H02 yards and two touch- 
downs. Clarion Head Coach 
Jay Foster continues to like 
what he sees out of Rupert. 

"Mark is getting better 
each week." he stated, and 
his statistics have proved it. 

The second half 
belonged to West Chester as 



they scored all 22 points, 
including Dean Millard 
touchdown runs of 65 yards 
and one yard. The Ram 
defense did not give in one 
bit as West Chester got their 
first victory of the season 
improving to 1-2. 

Even though the score 
may have been lopsided, the 
Golden Eagles had a ton of 
high points in this game. 



Odom had a career day 
with 246 yards receiving on 
six catches and Coach 
Foster was very happy 
about that, but he stressed 
consistency. 

"Obviously. Pierre had a 
tremendous game last 
Saturdav; but we need that 
consistency from him on a 
weekly basis." he said. 

The offensive line has 



always been very good at 
Clarion and this year is no 
exception, they have only 
given up three sacks all year 
long. Coach Foster also 
pointed out some key play- 
ers that have Clarion fans 
excited entering PSAC West 
play in 2 weeks. 

"Eddie Emanuel. Jim 
Simmons and Mark 
Foradora at tight end has 
added a nice dimension, and 
we have about a dozen 
freshmen who have been 
thrown into the fray and 
have responded very well." 

But on the flipside of 
things, a 0-3 record was not 
the vision Clarion had in 
mind to open the 2006 sea- 
son. Defensively the team 
needs to be stronger and 
Foster could see that in the 
West Chester game. 

"We plan on working on 
our tackling on defense after 
the performance versus 
WCU," Foster said. 

So expect the Golden 
Eagles to get a good workout 
from the coaching staff this 
week as they prepare for 
Bloomsburg on the road this 
coming Saturday at noon. 
The Huskies went 11-1 last 
season which helped them 
earn the number nine spot 
in the Division II preseason 
poll which they still hold 
after jumping out to a 2-1 
start this season. It will be 
another test for the new 
look Golden Eagles and 
Coach Jav Foster. 



Golf team wins Hal Hansen Invitational 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s_ekbowser@clarion.edu 

CLi\R10N, Sept. 18 - The 
Golden Eagles Golf team 
took advantage of playing 
on their home course this 
weekend and finished first 
out of 15 teams in the Hal 
Hansen Invitational held at 
Clarion Oaks Golf Club. 

Clarion finished with a 
total of 584 (-1-8) to beat out 
Concord University by one 
stroke in the two day event. 
Ohio Valley University fin- 
ished in thii'd place, six 
shots off the pace set by the 
Golden Eagles. 

"Playing on your home 
course is always an advan- 
tage, but teams do not 
always take advantage," 
Coach Al Lefevre said. 
"This time we did." 

The Golden F^agles were 
led to victory by senior 
Justin Scott and junior 
Justin Moose. Both Scott 
and Moose finished at 2- 
under par 142 for the two 
day event and were tied 
with Concord's Darcy 
Donaldson and Jesse 
Hiddleston for the individ- 
ual lead. Scott defeated 
Donaldson on the second 
playoff hole to take medalist 
honors. 

"Everyone performed 
well and Justin Scott and 
Justin Moose had a great 
tournament, but we are 
always looking to improve." 
Lefevre said. 

Scott shot a 5-under par 
67 on Sunday, the first day 
of the event, "flustin had 
one of the best tournaments 
in the history of the school," 
Lefevre said. 

The 5-under par round 
tied the low round in 
Clarion University history 



held by Anthony Tacconelli 
who set the record in 2000 
and Matt Guyton who did it 
twice in 2002. On Monday 
Scott was named the PSAC 
golfer of the week. 

Thanks in part to Scott's 
low round, the Golden 
F]agles set another school 
mark on Sunday. The team 
collectively shot a 5-under 
par 283 which bested the old 
mark of 2-under par set in 
2002. The Golden Eagles 
had five members of the 
team in the top 20 of the 
final individual standings 
for the event. 

Clarion took advantage 
of its only home match on 
the fall schedule. The 
Golden Eagles will hit the 
road this week for the 
Wheeling Jesuit 

Invitational on Monday and 
Tuesday which will be held 
at Moundsville Country 




Mike Cauvel/T/ie Clarion Call 
Get in the hole - The Clarion University Golf team finished first in the Hal Hansen Invitational held 
at Clarion Oaks Golf Club. Next up for the Golden Eagles is the Wheeling Jesuit Invitational. 



Club. The Golden Eagles 
finished in fourth place at 
the event last year which 
was won by Concord. 







I 



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NI4 226-WHIO 

www.clMritinhinik.cum 



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C O M M tj N I r t 1} A \ K 



Spoils Briefs 




Sports briefs courtesy of 
Sports Information 



Scott named PSAC 
golfer of the week 

Clarion University 
senior Justin Scott is the 
PSAC Golfer of the Weelc. 

Scott won medalist 
honors in a playoff at the 
Hal Hansen Invitational, 
which was hosted by the 
Golden Eagles at Clarion 
Oaks Golf Club. His vic- 
tory helped propel 
Clarion to the tea title at 
the two-day event. 

Scott shot a two-day 
total 2-under par 142 
and then won the playoff 
on the second hole. He 
also registered the low 
round of the tournament, 
a 67, on the opening day 
The 5-under par first 
round tied a school 
record. 



Gentile reaches 1,500 
career digs 




Vicky Gentile 



Clarion University 
junior Vicky Gentile, a 
member of the women's 
volleyball team, become 
the second player in 
school history to reach 
1,500 career digs when 
she had 1 4 digs vs. Lock 
Haven Tuesday. 

Gentile now has 
1,513 career digs and is 
second in school history 
behind Melanie Bull's 
2,000 career digs. 

This season, she 
leads the PSAC in digs 
per game (6.03) and has 
235 digs. She is the 
school-record holder for 
digs in a season (711 in 
2004) and also had the 
fourth most digs in a sea- 
son in Clarion history 
when she recorded 567 in 
2005. 

Gentile was a 2004 
second-team Daktronics 
Division H Volleyball All- 
Atlantic Region team 
member as a freshman. 

Clarion is 8-4 overall 
and 0-3 in the PSAC 
West this season. The 
Golden Eagles have won 
20 or more games for a 
school record five 
straight seasons and 
made appearances in the 
NCAA Division II play- 
offs in 2002, 2003 and 
2004 while also qualify- 
ing for the PSAC Playoffs 
in 2004. Clarion returns 
to action this weekend at 
the PSAC Crossovers at 
Lock Haven. 




I 



Check out the party 

forecast see "News" page 2 ""^^J^T^iwr 




Golf wins Wheeling Jesuit 

Invitational see sports page 12 



Eigtith annual Food Stock 



See "News ' page 2 



One copy free 



THE 




Clarion. Pennsylvania 16214 



Volume 93 Issue 3 




Nationol/" 
rlef$ ' 



Lo8 Angeles Times - 
Washington Pc^t News Service 



Report warns of 
hospital ERs at near 
breaking point 

WASHINGTON 
Emergency rooms at 
many hospitals are rou- 
tinely stretched to the 
breaking point, raising 
concerns that they won't 
be able to handle victims 
during a terrorist attack 
or natural disaster, 
according to congression- 
al testimony Wednesday 
and a new federal study. 

Between 40 percent 
and 50 percent of emer- 
gency departments expe- 
rienced crowding during 
2003 and 2004. the study 
by the Centers for 
Disease Control and 
Prevention found. 

It deemed an emer- 
gency room to be crowded 
if 80 many patients flood- 
ed in that ambulances 
had to be diverted to 
other hospitals, or people 
in urgent need of care 
had to wait an average of 
more than an hour, or at 
least three percent of 
patients simply gave up 
and left before being 
seen. 

Effect of pact on 
Paltistan's tribai 

regions uncertain 

PAKISTAN - Three 
weeks after Pakistan's 
president, Gen. Pervez 
Musharraf, announced a 
peace pact with Taliban 
radicals in a tribal area 
bordering Afghanistan, 
recent visitors say there 
is now pin-drop silence in 
a territory that once 
shook with artillery and 
bomb blasts, and that 
religious patrols are 
enforcing law and order 
in place of Pakistan army 
troops who have with- 
drawn to their barracks. 
But as the toll of vio- 
lence rises across the bor- 
der, with suicide bomb- 
ings killing 22 people in 
three Afghan cities this 
week, there are reports 
that militant Pakistani 
tribal leaders, while com- 
plying with their pledge 
to reduce the presence of 
foreign Islamic fighters, 
intend to defy the peace 
pact by sending more 
local Taliban supporters 
into Afghanistan to be 
insurgents and suicide 
bombers. 

Georgia arrests four 
mssian officers on spy- 
ing charges 

GEORGIA - Georgia 
Arrests Four Russian 
Officers on Spying 
Charges Russian military 
officers were arrested on 
spying charges 

Wednesday, and police 
surrounded a Russian 
military headquarters 
here demanding that a 
fifth Russian officer be 
handed over to local 
authorities. 



September 28, 2006 



College Republicans revamp club 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 

CLXKION. Sept. 27 - The 
Clarion University College 
Republicans elected new 
leaders and will hold a 
meeting on Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. 
in room 204 of Founder's 
Hall. 

The College 

Republicans originated in 
200.'} and have started off 
this semester with new 
leadership. 

Newly elected College 
Republican President, Mike 
Armstrong, has given the 
campus group an aggressive 
agenda for the upcoming 
year. 

Currently, the club 
boasts the largest member- 
ship of any political organi- 
zation on campus. 

"Since the beginning of 
the fall semester, our mem- 
bership has grown from less 
then 10 to nearly 80 mem- 
bers," said Armstrong. 

College Republican sec- 




Provided by Greg Mortimer 

College Republicans- (L-R) President Micheal Arrvstrong, Vice-President f^atthew Petruna, 
Secretary Anna Welsh. Treasurer Valerie Heigel, and advisor, Barry Sweet. 



retary, Anna Welsh said, "1 
became involved in the 
College Republicans after 
the now-president, Michael 
Armstrong informed me 
that he wanted to re-vamp 
the already existing club 



and really try and make it 
more influential around 
campus." 

The most recent addi- 
tion to the executive board 
of the organization is the 
webmaster. Dan Keloskv- 



Armstrong has assigned 
the groups members to a 
variety of new committees, 
including^ campaigns and 
activism, special events, 
banquets, fundraising and 
budgeting. 



"We're very pleased to 
see the enthusiasm and 
hard work ... we hope to 
integrate many of these stu- 
dent volunteers into our 
county Republican activities 
also," said Clarion County 
GOP Chairman. Greg 
Mortimer. 

"We are planning a mul- 
titude of activities this 
semester," said Vice- 
President, Matthew 
Petruna. "We will have a 
float in the A.L.F. parade." 

The College 

Republicans hosted College 
Republicans Rock Concert 
in the Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room on Sept. 24 
and will work on various 
campaign events, a fall ban- 
quet, a "Rock the Vote" 
event, with the Young 
Democrats organization and 
possibly a campaign event 
featuring U.S. Sen. Rick 
Santorum. 

See "FACULTY" 
continued on page 2. 



Faculty senate to select cleans 




Adam Mohney 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ajmohney@clarion.edu 

CLi\RION. Sept. 25 - On 
Sept. 25 the CUP Faculty 
Senate met in Hart Chapel 
and approved search com- 
mittees that will select a 
dean for the College of Arts 
and Sciences and the 
College of Education and 
Human Services. 

The proposed slate for 
the search committee, which 
will select a new dean for 
the College of Arts and 
Sciences includes Beth 
Jackson and Dana Madison, 
Mathematics; Sharon 

Montgomery, Physicsi 

Uraina Pack, English: 
Eleanor ter Horst, Modern 
Languages; Joe Thomas, 
Art. Jackson will represent 
Venango campus. 

The proposed search 



committee for selecting a 
dean for the College of 
Education and Human 
Services will include 
Jonathan Brown and Sonja 
Heeter, Education; William 
Buchanan, Library Science; 
Young-Gyoung Kim and 
Shari Wynkoop. Special 
Education; MaryPat 

McCarthy. Communication 
Sciences and Disorders. 
Wynkoop will represent 
Venango Campus. 

President Joseph 

Grunenwald commended 
the Committee on 

Committee and Rules (CCR) 
for their selections for the 
proposed search commit- 
tees. "CCR did an excellent 
job selecting these search 
committees. There is great 
minority representation on 
the proposed slates," he 
said. 

Dr. Todd Pfannestiel. 
Chair of the Faculty Senate, 
sees the approval of the pro- 
posed committees as the 
most important thing the 
Senate covered on Monday. 
"These are two very impor- 
tant searches for the univer- 



sity community, especially 
with regard to academic 
affairs," he said. 

The proposed commit- 
tees will now go to President 
Grunenwald for his final 
approval. "After [President 
Grunenwald's] approval, the 
search committees will meet 
and begin the process of hir- 
ing the two new deans," 
Pfannestiel said. 

Grunenwald announced 
the final enrollment totals 
for the Fall 2006 freeze date 
in his president's report. 
Undergraduate enrollment 
was 6.951. up from 6.581 at 
the beginning of the semes- 
ter. Graduate enrollment 
had also increased to 664, 
up from 656 at the begin- 
ning of the semester. 

The budget for the 2006- 
2007 school year was also 
approved by the Council of 
Trustees. according to 
Grunenwald. He said the 
budget deficit is just under 
$2 million, which is signifi- 
cantly les.s than it was last 
year. Budget planning for 
the 2007-2008 school year 
will begin within the next 



month, as approximated by 
Grunenwald. 

Grunenwald also 

announced plans to poten- 
tially hire a web marketeer 
at the university. "This 
would be a content person, 
not a technology person, 
who would strive to make 
our website more user 
friendly, " he said. 

Grunenwald said inten- 
tions of purchasing new hir- 
ing software for CUP were 
also underway. Grunenwald 
said a committee will be 
selected to review and ana- 
lyze several different types 
of software. He also added 
the software would be used 
for hiring all occupations at 
the university. 

Junior, Joshua Pierce, a 
student senator, issued the 
Student Senate report. 
Pierce announced that 
freshman elections will take 
place within the next few 
weeks. Pierce also 

added that the annual 
Safety Walk, which was held 
Sept. 21 was successful. He 
said the Student Senate will 
begin planning Casino 



Night, which will take place 
in December. 

Dr. Jamie Phillips 
announced Student Affairs 
will meet this week for the 
first time to elect their first 
chair. Phillips was also 
announced as chair of the 
General Education depart- 
ment for this school year. 

Dr. Patricia Kolencik, 
chair of Faculty Affairs, 
announced Robert Nulph 
was elected as chair of the 
Technology Department for 
the 2006-2007 school year. 

Dr. David Lott offered 
the Venango report. He 
announced that the commit- 
tee search for a new director 
of the School of Nursing has 
been approved. The search 
will begin on Oct. 1. 

CCR, Academic 

Standards, the Budget, and 
Faculty Affairs all offered no 
report. 

Pfannestiel hopes to 
make CUP a better univer- 
sity for students while he is 
the chair of the Faculty 
Senate. 

See "FACULTY" 
continued on page 2. 



Nationally ranked debate team begins season 



Shakira O'Neil 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_soneil@ciarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 27 - The 
Clarion University Debate 
Team began their season on 
Sept. 20 at the King's 
Tournament in Wilkes- 
Barre. Pa. 

The champion Debate 
Team has ranked fourth in 
the Nation for two consecu- 
tive years. 

The team consists of 25- 
40 students with some of 
them being new to campus. 

The topic for this year 
debate is "Resolved; The 
U.S. Supreme Court Should 
Overrule One or More of 
These Decisions; Planned 
Parenthood vs. Casey, 
Morrison vs. United States, 
Milliken vs. Bradley, and 
Exparte Quirin vs. United 
States." 

Topics for debate are 



chosen by the American 
Debate Association. 

The teams debating on 
the topics spend time on 
both the negative and affir- 
mative sides of the topic. 

The team consists of 
four levels of competition. 
Varsity, which implies that 
you have extensive back- 
ground with several years of 
debating experience; Junior 
Varsity, which implies that 
you have two or more years 
of experience with place- 
ment at two or more tourna- 
ments; and Novice, which 
are debaters in their first 
year of competition. 

The most important 
goal for the Debate Team is 
to continue to do well and 
rank nationally. This year 
the Debate Team had a 
$1,500 donation that they 
will be using to provide 
scholarships to team mem- 
bers. 



With this first time 
scholarship money, there is 
a hope that promising high 
school debaters will come 



sists of members; Bill 
Dummett, a senior microbi- 
ology major; Kelly Goodrich, 
a senior political science 




Photo courtesy of the Newswire 
Champion debaters - (L-R) Bill Dummett, Jessica Zezulewicz 

forward. major; Rob Noerr, a senior 

The debate team con- speech communication 



major; Taylor Hahn, a sen- 
ior anthropology major; 
Ryan Adamiak, a sophomore 
political science major; Dave 
Durney, a junior philosophy 
major; Tom Toner, a fresh- 
man secondary education 
earth and space science 
major; Emily Brytus, a 
freshman art major; 
Heather Morrow, a senior 
early childhood education 
major; Emannuel Jones, a 
junior speech communica- 
tion major; Brad Kapp, a 
freshman accounting major; 
Megan Shewell, a freshman 
secondary education 

English major; Matt Tenney, 
a sophomore sociology 
major; and Mary Loveless, a 
freshman political science 
major. 

Novice debater, Jones 
said "I see why we are 
nationally ranked," said 
Jones, "It's intimidating to 
be on the team." 



Page 2 



TM CLARION CALL 



September 28. 2006 



lews 



Student senate reports Increase 
in enrollment, graduation rate 

SmKNT 




Tina Sickler 

Clarion Call Managing Editor 

s_tjsickler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 25 - The 
third meeting of the Student 
Senate started with a dis- 
cussion about the increase 
in enrollment amongst all of 
Clarion University campus- 
es. 

Student Trustee Garrett 
Sell attended the 

Pennsylvania Council of 



Trustees meeting at 
Venango campus in which 
enrollment and graduation 
rates were discussed. 
Enrollment is up 239 stu- 
dents which is 3.5 percent 
increase from the 2005-2006 
school year. Venango cam- 
pus alone has 854 students, 
while Allied Health 
Program in Pittsburgh has 
about 150 students. The 
total number of students 
attending Clarion this year 
is 6,581. Graduation rates 
from the 2005-2006 school 
year has also increased by 
1.1 percent from the previ- 
ous year. 

Heather Puhalla and 
Willy West were slated in as 
freshmen sentors, due to the 
fact that they met all of the 
requirements and were the 
only two that applied. 



Vice-President Jenna 
Agostino announced Kelsi 
Wilcox as the Senator of the 
Week. Wilcox was recog- 
nized for planning the 
Safety Walk that was held 
on Thursday Sept. 21. 

Upcoming Events were 
discussed and include: 

President Justin 

Dandoy announced that the 
Political Science 

Association, College 

Republicans and College 
Democrats will be hosting a 
"Rock the Vote" campaign on 
Oct. 28 and need organiza- 
tions to co-sponsor this 
event with them. 

Vice-president Agostino 
announced that the Mary 
Walter Leadership 

Development series will 
begin next Wednesday. 

The Board of Directors 



will meet on Tuesday, Oct. 3 
at 5 p.m. in room 246 
Gemmell. 

Panhellenic Council will 
sponsor National Anti-haz- 
ing week. The event will 
include speaker Mark 
Sterner on DUI issues. 
Gamma and Kappa Delta 
Ro will be giving out infor- 
mational handouts. 

UAB will host a car 
show Thursday Sept. 28 
from 1-4 p.m. on the basket- 
ball courts above Wilkson 
Hall and Nair Hall. The 
UAB movie of the week will 
be "Superman Returns." 
The movie will be shown in 
the Gemmell Multi- Purpose 
Room at 8 p.m. Thursday 
and Friday and 8 p.m. in the 
Gemmell Food Court on 
Saturday. The meeting 
adjourned at 7^50 p.m. 



Immigration iaw enforcement begins 



Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

CHARLOTTE, N.C.— Pohce 
here operated for years 
under what amounts to a 
"don't ask, don't tell" policy 
toward illegal immigrants. 

As elsewhere in the 
United States, law enforce- 
ment officers did not check 
the immigration status of 
people they came into con- 
tact with, and in the vast 
majority of cases, a run-in 
with the law carried little 
threat of deportation. 

But that accommoda- 
tion for the burgeoning ille- 
gal population ended 
abruptly in April, when the 
Mecklenburg County sher- 
iff's office began to enforce 
immigration law, placing 
more than 100 people a 
month into deportation pro- 
ceedings. 

Some of them had been 
charged with violent crimes, 
others with traffic infrac- 
tions. 

The program takes one 
of the most aggressive 
stances in the United States 
toward illegal immigrants, 
and officials in scores of 
communities have been con- 
sidering adopting their own 
version. 

The House earlier this 
month was weighing a 
measure "reaffirming" the 
authority of local law 
enforcement agencies to 
arrest people on suspicion of 
violating immigration laws. 

Some law enforcement 



agencies elsewhere have 
shied away from enforcing 
immigration laws, saying 
that doing so would rupture 
any trust they have devel- 



lated the law — however 
insignificant it may seem to 
some people," he said. "I've 
heard sad stories about 
folks wanting to come up 




Los Angeles Times-Washington Post News Service 

Illegal Immigrants - U.S. begins enforcing immigrant policies. 



oped in Latino neighbor- 
hoods. But advocates see it 
as a way to catch illegal 
immigrants who slip 
through porous federal 
enforcement measures and 
then run afoul of state or 
local police. 

Mecklenburg County 
Sheriff Jim Pendergraph 
says there should be little 
sympathy for illegal immi- 
grants caught by his pro- 
gram: They have already 
broken the law once by 
being here illegally, and 
then been arrested on suspi- 
cion of another crime. 

"When any of them cross 
that border without proper 
documentation, they've vio- 



here and have a better life 
and earn money for their 
family. I've arrested bank 
robbers who've had the 
same excuse." 

While the program has 
led to the removal of many 
illegal immigrants charged 
with felonies, people arrest- 
ed for lesser charges such as 
traffic violations are also 
subject to deportation. 

That, according to 
Hispanic leaders, has creat- 
ed a constant worry for peo- 
ple who are in the United 
States illegally and now fear 
deportation after a simple 
traffic stop. 

Many illegal immi- 
grants lack vahd licenses. 



As a result, they now risk 
not only arrest but also 
deportation whenever they 
drive. 

"The law enforcement 
community is split on this 
issue," said Gene Voegtlin, 
legislative counsel for the 
International Association of 
Chiefs of Police. 

The local agencies 
against enforcing immigra- 
tion law "are concerned 
about the chilling effect it 
will have on immigrants' 
cooperation with law 
enforcement," he said. 

In Mecklenburg County, 
about 1,200 foreign-born 
people have been arrested 
since April, on charges rang- 
ing from traffic violations 
and trespassing to sex 
crimes, and nearly 600 have 
been found to be here ille- 
gally 

Besides Mecklenburg, 
six other state and local law 
enforcement agencies have 
started similar programs in 
recent years. 

A dozen more are being 
worked out with U.S. 
Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement. 

And in the past three 
months, hundreds of state 
and local departments have 
inquired about similar 
efforts, said Robert J. Hines, 
who heads the program for 
the ICE. 

"When you are removing 
the criminal element from 
the community, it's hard to 
point a finger and say it's a 
bad thing," Hines said. 



The Clarion Call Weather for Sept. 28 - Oct. 4 






7-Day Forecast 



THURSDAY 

T-storms Likely 
High: 58 Low: 44 

FRIDAY 

Few Showers 
High: 54 Low: 37 

SATURDAY 

Few Showers 
High: 59 Low: 45 

SUNDAY 

Showers Likely 
High: 61 Low: 43 

MONDAY 

Mostly Sunny 
High: 62 Low: 44 

TUESDAY 

Mostly Sunny 
High: 67 Low: 50 

WEDNESDAY 

Few Showers 
High: 67 Low: 52 







Local In-Depth Forecast 



Today we will see cloudy skies with a 90% 
chance of showers and thunderstorms, high 
temperature of 58", humidity of 80% and an 
overnight low of 44". The record high temper- 
ature for today is 77" set in 1971. The record 
low temperature is 31" set in 1964. Friday, 
skies will be mostly cloudy with a 40% chance 
of showers, high temperature of 54", humidity 
of 65% and an overnight low of 37". 



Local Almanac Last Week 



Date Hi/Lo Normal Precip 

Wednesday, 9/20 55/39 72/46 0.00" 

Thursday, 9/21 62/37 72/46 0.00" 

Friday 9/22 64/41 72/45 0.00" 

Saturday, 9/23 71/57 71/45 0.10" 

Sunday, 9/24 68/54 71/45 0.09" 

Monday 9/25 62/48 70/44 0.01" 

Tuesday 9/26 64/44 70/44 0.00" 

Total rainfall last week 0.20" 

Normal rainfall last week 1.12" 

Departure from normal -0.92" 

Data reported from Du Bois-Jefferson County Airport 




Party Forecast 



Friday Night 

Clear 

Temps: Lower 40s 
Precip Chance: 0% 
Saturday Night 

Showers Likely 
Temps: Upper 40s 
Precip Chance: 60% 



Weather Trivia 



What is the dijference between a M 
hurricane and a typhoon? L 



uooifd^l e paiie.i si 
3UB3iJinq B MijpBj ujaisea oqi u| uouBaoT :J3ttniV 



Moon Phases 






9/30 10/6 10/13 10/22 

© 2006. Accessweather.com, Inc. 




T' a synopsii of all crimiimi 

iii*.-r.i,iKuiii.un MS ruijumitjii by the Clarion Univemty 
Public Safetv for the month of September 2006, 
All 1 ao^ssed on the Public Safety 

Web page. 

a Joseph Af noto, 23. of Corsica, Pa., has charges land- 
ing for a DUI after he was stopped on Main Street for 
CToasing the center line several times on Sept. 21 at 
2^21 a.m. Arnato failed sobriety checks and PBT. 
Charges are pending blood insults, 

■ Sept. 1 7, an unknown individual egged a vehicle in 
parking lot 8. Video tapes are being reviewed. 

M Vanessa Gabler, 22, of St. Marys, Pa., was cit«l for 
public dninkennesa while attending a concert in l^ppin 
Gym. 

at Clifford Park, 20, of Summerville, Pa., was observed 
staggering in Tippin Gym during a concert. Park was 
found to be under the infleunce of alcohol and was cited 
for underage consumption and public drunkenness. 



■ Ijaurie Grieshober, 18, of Erie, Pa., was cited for 
underage consumption on Sept. 15 while in Nair Hall. 

■ Paul Duris U, 18, of Erie, Pa., was cited for underage 
consumption on Sept. 15 while in Nair Hall. 

■ Timothy Novi, 18, of Monroeville, Pa., was cited for 
underage consumption on Sept. 15 while in Nair Hall. 

■I l^e Barclay. 20, of Derrick City, Pa., was cited for 
underage consumption and public drunkenness on 
Sept. 15. Police were called to Wilkineon HaH and saw 
Barclay staggering and rioticed slurred speech and 
blood shot eym, and a strong odor of alcohol. 

■ Eachary Karcz, 18, of Monaca.Pa,, h^s been charged 
with an underage consumption on Sept. 15. ,. 








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Tlffi CLARIOW C ftLL 



Page 3 



hm 



Reservations recommended for symposium 



Natalie Kennel I 
Clamn Call Staff Writer 

s.neKennelOclarlon.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 27 - 
Clarion University will host 
Hip-Hop: The Politics of 
Morality symposium on Oct. 
18 in the Gemmell Student 
Center. 

Student panelists for 
the symposium are Matt 
Allen, freshman, informa- 
tion systems; Emmanuel 
Jones, junior, speech com- 
munication; and Michelle 
Williams, sophomore, eco- 
nomics major. 

"I'm seeing an excite- 
ment among students, espe- 
cially those who have volun- 
teered to work on the sym- 
posium, said communication 
professor and symposium 
organizer. Dr. Joanne 
Washington. 'This has real- 
ly been an exercise in 
human relations as stu- 
dents, including several 
returning adults, from vari- 
ous backgrounds, are com- 
ing together and working 
towards a common goal." 

Guests, Bakari Kitwana 
and Akiba Solomon's will 
have a book signing session 
at 1:30 p.m. and their books 
will also be sold on location. 

Students are still able to 
volunteer their time for the 
symposium by attending the 
mandatory meeting Sept. 28 
at 6 p.m. in room 124 in 
Becker. There are several 
different areas of interest 
volunteers may choose to be 
involved in such as guest 
services, high school discus- 
sion leaders, hospitality, 
information services, logis- 
tics, multimedia, publicity, 



and registration. 

Student volunteers are 
also able to gain co-curricu- 
lar credit for their involve- 
ment. 

"I believe faculty who 
participate in the sympo- 
sium with their students 
will gain an appreciation of 
the convergence of hip-hop 
and their disciphnes," 
Washington said. "Certainly 
hip-hop has had a great eco- 
nomic, cultural and pohtical 
impact on mainstream 
America." 

The symposium is free 
and open to the public, how- 
ever, you must reserve your 
seat on the Web site, 
http://jupiter.clarion.edu/~hi 
phopsymp. Information per- 
taining to reservation of 
seats can also be obtained 
by e-mail at 

hiphopsymp@clarion.edu or 
at 814-393-1883. 

The deadline to reserve 
seats is Oct. 11. 

Attendees will include 
high school students, teach- 
ers, university students, fac- 
ulty, and community mem- 
bers. The expected atten- 
dance is around 500 people 
at each session. 

The goal of the sympo- 
sium is to ultimately incor- 
porate Hip-Hop tactics into 
a classroom setting. 
Stanford University, Kansas 
State University, the 
University of Rhode Island, 
Northeastern University, 
and Oakland University are 
some of the universities that 
have already pioneered this 
vision. 

Public schools across 
America use Hip-Hop to 
teach such subjects as Social 
Studies and English. Native 



American and other indige- 
nous groups use Hip-Hop to 
communicate their culture 
and connect with their 
youth. 

Several grants have 
been issued to support the 
symposium including The 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education, Office 
of the Chancellor and a 
Three-Year Presidential 
Advancement Award along 
with Dr. Marite Haynes, Dr. 
Jamie Phillips, Dr. Sandra 
Trejos and Michael Torres. 
As well, Dr. Washington, 
Merrilyn Dunlap and Blair 
Betts wrote a grant to bring 
minority student leaders 
from regional high schools 
to the event. Financial sup- 
port was also received from 
the Department of 
Communication, Black 
Student Union, Martin 
Luther King Jr. Committee, 
The Edna R. Brown 
Community Program Fund, 
Women's Studies, 

Presidential Commission on 
Human Relations, College of 
Arts and Sciences, Office of 
the Dean, Office of the 
President and Office of the 
Provost. 

Students should begin 
to see posters up around 
campus. Bill Reese, a gradu- 
ate student in the communi- 
cation department is design- 
ing the website. Students 
are able to sign up for the 
symposium at hiphop- 
8ymp@clarion.edu. Senior, 
communication major, 

Jenna Angelos, designed an 
informational brochure that 
will be available soon. 

"In general, anyone who 
has an interest in Hip-Hop 
will find something of inter- 







8j30 lum. - 7:00 


Ke^tftrtition ((Closed for Lunch and Dinner) and 
Art Shovyr 


10K».11:30 


Sewion Once Hip-Hop, I AM a Cultural mnA 
Economic BcploMon -William Devlin (V^tr^ 
FresiOtfit, Indpendencf Pkmnmg Group and Foundkr, 
Uyfban Famify Counctl\ Li«a Ellis {PresiOmi, Sony 
Uftan Musk), Bakari Kihvana {co-founder cf^te 
'Naiioned Hxp-Hop Poltical Convention, Marcyliena 
M oi^an (Projector, Dept. ofContmunicatloiv 
Founder and Dmctor cftke HpHop Archife% 
Stanford Unip.\ Emmanuel J ones (Junwr, Ckmon 
Unw.) 


ll:30-12rf» p.m. 


Break- out Set sions 


12.-0D-160 


Lunch Break (on your own) and Student 
Performances 


l-.3O2:00 


Bi«ak 


2s00^3:3D 


StMloB Two: Hip-Hop, I AM Image Jdcnttty 
and Mmral Cholcca -Monica Haynes 
iEnteriaimnent CoJumnisi Pittsburgh Pcst-Garjii^, 
Gary H ortofv (Pitsidmi Em Urtain ConwmnHxf 
Dsi^o^^^mcnlCoiT?,) Bakari Kitwanfl^ Akl>a 
Solomon {Pormer Smiot Editor, Vibe Vixen Mag)^ 
Matt Allen (Fres^moy; Oaricn liftm) Michelle 
Williams {Sophanor^ Ckirion Unw.) 


3:30-4:00 


Break-Out Sessions 


4:00-6.-00 


Student Peif ormances 


6:00-7:00 


Dinner Break (on yowr ocm) 


7<)(ysm 


l^caal«B Tkree Hip Hop, I AM Media Influence 
amd tlia Voice of »p-Hop 

ftihnaon Ckrmicte^ BET) and Questlove, {ThePjoois) 



est." said Washington. 

In addition to the speak- 
ers and organized discus- 
sions, several student 



groups and individuals are 
performinf including David 
Banks, Mike Barron, Adam 
Evans, the Clarion Dance 



Team, the Hip-Hop Team 
and KUDETS, a new uni- 
versity step team group. 



Alpha Phi Omega hosts 
eighth annual Food Stock 



Krystal Finkbeiner 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_knfinkbein@clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 27 - On 
Sept. 29-30 Clarion 
Universities Co-ed 

Fraternity, Alpha Phi 
Omega, will host the 8th 
annual Food Stock event. 

This event will be held 
outside the courthouse for 
24 hours and will benefit 
less fortunate families. 

This year Alpha Phi 
Omega, a community serv- 
ice Co-ed fraternity, will be 
the organizing Food Stock. 

Sophomore and 

President of Alpha Phi 
Omega, Oliva Osche, is run- 
ning the event this year. 

"Clarion Ministries, 
Charitable Deeds, Clarion 
Gun Owners have done this 
in the past and are very 
excited about helping out 



again," said Osche. 
Alpha Phi Omega has been 
working with other fraterni- 
ties, sororities and local 
shops to get them involved 
in the event. 

"Many organizations are 
involved in this event. Alpha 
Sigma Tau, Student Honors 
Association, Cub Scouts and 
many more have been a very 
big help in pulling together 
a huge beneficial project for 
others," said Osche. 

According to Osche, 
many of the surrounding 
communities will help col- 
lect monetary and non-per- 
ishable food items. 

"Organizations from the 
University volunteered to 
pass out bags throughout 
the community on Monday, 
"Sept. 25 these bags go to 
local shops and homes 
throughout the Clarion com- 
munity who agreed to par- 
ticipate. These bags will 



then be picked up on Sept. 
27," said Osche. 

Although Food Stock is 
going to be held in Clarion 
the surrounding communi- 
ties; Knox, Strattanville, 
and Sligo, are participating 
and are a huge help accord- 
ing to Osche. 

"Other organizations 
and individuals volunteer to 
work the actual event on 
Friday they are doing two 
hour increments" said, 
Osche. 

"I am looking forward to 
participating in this event, I 
think it is awesome that col- 
lege students can finally 
give back to their communi- 
ty, even if it is only two 
hours, famihes in need will 
really appreciate it," said 
sophomore and Sigma Alpha 
Iota member, Carrie Vatter. 

"I think that this event 
is very important to the 
Clarion Area. Many families 



will be fortunate to receive 
items donated by this event 
I believe that the support of 
the community is one of the 
most important things in 
making this a successful 
event" said Vatter. 

Sophomore, Ashley 
Rodgers said, "We're going 
to feed America, if we keep 
this food drive going 
strong." 

"I believe this project 
brings the community closer 
to the University as we 
work for one common goal," 
said Rodgers. 

"We [Alpha Phi Omega] 
are very thankful to all of 
the organizations that are 
willing to help," said Osche. 
"Every little bit is greatly 
appreciated, and each bit of 
help is what makes this 
event- successful with the 
help of the surrounding 
community, this event is 
sure to be a success." 



Ensle named 
assistant to 
executive dean 



Counseling services offer alcolioi 
screenings in Cliandler dining iiaii 



Kelly PennisI 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kpennisi®clarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 27 - On 
Oct. 2 volunteer alcohol 
screenings will take place 
at Clarion University in 
Chandler Dining Hall 
between 10:30 a.m. and 
2^30 p.m. by counselors 
from the Department of 
Counseling Services. 

The screenings will be 



done by the counselors, 
Mary Ann Fricko, Jason 
Braun, and Kay King. 

Students may also take 
the screening tests online 
on Clarion's online counsel- 
ing homepage. 

The screenings will take 
place before A.L.F. because 
there is more concern sur- 
rounding drinking. 

The screening process will 
be a questionnaire. 

The questions will 
cover various topics about 



the consumption of alcohol. 
The students will receive 
the results within 10 min- 
utes of completing the 
screening. After the stu- 
dents have gone through 
the screening they will 
receive the results in about 
ten minutes. If for some 
reason, students are reluc- 
tant to receive their results 
in person, they can go 
online and obtain their 
results. 

Senior, Ryan Eisenman 



said, "I guess if it's volun- 
teer-based then it's a good 
idea." 

Once the tests are 
scored students can ask 
additional questions if they 
wish to do so. The coun- 
selors can also then refer 
people to other counseling 
services in the county. 

Freshman Rachel 

Mackey said, "I think it's a 
good idea to make students 
more aware if they have 
alcohol problems." 



Shakira O'Neil 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_sjoneil@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 27 - Kay 
Ensle, a life long Oil City 
resident and community 
service advocate, has been 
named the assistant to the 
executive dean at the 
Venango campus. 

She will work with aca- 
demic colleagues to manage 
campus academic budgets 
and advocate the develop- 
ment of new programs to 
meet regional needs. 

"The assistant to the 
Executive Dean position will 
enable me to develop new 
skills and sharpen the ones 
that I already have in a 
brand new environment," 
said Ensle. "As a member of 
the management team, I 
look forward to supporting 
the overall growth and 
development of Venango 
Campus. My immediate 
goal is to become familiar 
with my new position 
responsibilities as soon as 
possible." 

Mrs. Ensle has a very 
impressive track record as 
community member of Oil 
city. She attended Oil City 
Area High School, and 
received a master of library 
science degree from Clarion 
University. She was pre- 
voiualy an elementary 
school teacher for the 
Franklin Area School 
District and also served as 
the assistant Ubrary direc- 
tor for the Oil City library. 
In addition to being success- 



ful career wise she is also a 
community service advo- 
cate. 

"My former position as 
the director of the Oil City 
Library for over 20 years 
helped me to prepare skills 
that are transferable to 
many of the responsibilities 
of my position," said Ensle. 
"My colleagues will be very 
helpful as I transition to the 
academic environment! I 
look forward to being a part 
of the exciting things that 
are happening at the 
Venango campus." 

Ensle is involved in a 
number of community serv- 
ice organizations such as 
the First Book of Venango 
County, American Red 
Cross, Venango County 
Association for the Blind, 
United Way of Venango 
County and the Venango 
County Humane Society. 

She also received the Oil 
City Area Jaycees 
Distinguished Service 

Award in 1984. 

The Venango campus is 
the oldest regional campus 
in the Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher 

Education. 

"Venango campus is 
committed to meeting the 
needs of the community," 
said Ensle. "The small cam- 
pus atmosphere is extreme- 
ly conductive to learning 
and the faculty and staff are 
top notch individuals with a 
shared vision of making the 
campus a center of excel- 
lence. It is an honor to join 
the Venango Campus team." 



Page 2 



TTffi CLARION CALL 



September 28. 2006 



lews 



Student senate reports increase 
In enrollment, graduation rate 



SiaDEMT 
SMATE 




Tina Sickler 

Clarion Call Managing Editor 

s_tjsickler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 25 - The 
third meeting? of tho Student 
Senate started with a dis- 
cussion about the increase 
in enrollment amongst all of 
Clarion University campus- 
es. 

Student Trustee Garrett 
Sell attended the 

Pennsvlvania Council of 



Trustees meeting at 
Venango campus in which 
enrollment and graduation 
rates were discussed. 
Knrollment is up 2.'59 stu- 
dents which is ;J.5 percent 
increase from the 2U05-2()()6 
school year. Venango cam- 
pus alone has 854 students, 
while Allied Health 
I'rogi-ani in Pittsburgh has 
about 150 students. The 
total number of students 
attending Clarion this year 
is 6,581. Graduation rates 
from the 2()05-20()6 school 
year has also increased by 
1.1 percent from the previ- 
ous year. 

Heather Puhalla and 
Willy West were slated in as 
freshmen sentors. due to the 
fact that they met all of the 
requirements and were the 
only two that applied. 



Vice-President Jenna 
.\gostino announced Kelsi 
Wilcox as the Senator of the 
Week. Wilcox was recog- 
nized for planning the 
Safety Walk that was held 
on Thursday Sept. 21. 

Upcoming Events were 
discussed and include: 

President Justin 

Dandoy announced that the 
Political Science 

Association. College 

Republicans and College 
Democrats will be hosting a 
"Rock the Vote" campaign on 
Oct. 28 and need organiza- 
tions to co-sponsor this 
event with them. 

Vice-president Agostino 
announced that the Mary 
Walter Leadership 

Development series will 
begin next Wednesday. 

The Board of Directors 



will meet on Tuesday, Oct. 3 
at 5 p.m. in room 216 
Gemmell. 

Panhellenic Council will 
sponsor National Anti-haz- 
ing week. The event will 
include speaker Mark 
Sterner on DUI issues. 
Gamma and Kappa Delta 
Ro will be giving out infor- 
mational handouts. 

UAB will host a car 
show Thursday, Sept. 28 
from 1-4 p.m. on the basket- 
ball courts above Wilkson 
Hall and Nair Hall. The 
UAB movie of the week will 
be "Superman Returns." 
The movie will be shown in 
the Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room at 8 p.m. Thursday 
and Friday and 8 p.m. in the 
Gemmell Food Court on 
Saturday. The meeting 
adjourned at 7:50 p.m. 



Immigration law enforcement begins 



Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post Newsservice 

CHARLOTTE, N.C.— Police 
here operated for years 
under what amounts to a 
"don't ask. don't tell" policy 
toward illegal immigrants. 

As elsewhere in the 
United States, law enforce- 
ment officers did not check 
the immigration status of 
people they came into con- 
tact with, and in the vast 
majority of cases, a run-in 
with the law carried little 
threat of deportation. 

But that accommoda- 
tion for the burgeoning ille- 
gal population ended 
abruptly in April, when the 
Mecklenburg County sher- 
iff's office began to enforce 
immigration law, placing 
more than 100 people a 
month into deportation pro- 
ceedings. 

Some of them had been 
charged with violent crimes, 
others with traffic infrac- 
tions. 

The program takes one 
of the most aggressive 
stances in the United States 
toward illegal immigrants, 
and officials in scores of 
communities have been con- 
sidering adopting their own 
version. 

The House earlier this 
month was weighing a 
measure "reaffirming" the 
authority of local law 
enforcement agencies to 
arrest people on suspicion of 
violating immigration laws. 

Some law enforcement 



agencies elsewhere have 
shied away from enforcing 
immigration laws, saying 
that doing so would rupture 
anv trust thev have deveh 



lated the law — however 
insignificant it may seem to 
some people," he said. "I've 
heard sad stories- about 
folks wanting to come up 




Los Angeles Times-Washington Post News Service 
Illegal immigrants - U.S. begins enforcing immigrant policies. 



oped in Latino neighbor- 
hoods. But advocates see it 
as a way to catch illegal 
immigrants who slip 
through porous federal 
enforcement measures and 
then run afoul of state or 
local police. 

Mecklenburg County 
Sheriff Jim Pendergraph 
says there should be httle 
sympathy for illegal immi- 
grants caught by his pro- 
gram: They have already 
broken the law once by 
being here illegally, and 
then been arrested on suspi- 
cion of another crime. 

"When any of them cross 
that border without proper 
documentation, thev've vio- 



here and have a better life 
and earn money for their 
family. I've arrested bank 
robbers who've had the 
same excuse." 

While the program has 
led to the removal of many 
illegal immigrants charged 
with felonies, people arrest- 
ed for lesser charges such as 
traffic violations are also 
subject to deportation. 

That, according to 
Hispanic leaders, has creat- 
ed a constant worry for peo- 
ple who are in the United 
States illegally and now fear 
deportation after a simple 
traffic stop. 

Many illegal immi- 
grants lack valid licenses. 



As a result, they now risk 
not only arrest but also 
deportation whenever they 
drive. 

"The law enforcement 
community is split on this 
issue," said Gene Voegtlin. 
legislative counsel for the 
International Association of 
Chiefs of Police. 

The local agencies 
against enforcing immigra- 
tion law "are concerned 
about the chilling effect it 
will have on immigrants' 
cooperation with law 
enforcement," he said. 

In Mecklenburg County, 
about 1,200 foreign-born 
people have been arrested 
since April, on charges rang- 
ing from traffic violations 
and trespassing to sex 
crimes, and nearly 600 have 
been found to be here ille- 
gally. 

Besides Mecklenburg. 
six other state and local law 
enforcement agencies have 
started similar programs in 
recent years. 

A dozen more are being 
worked out with U.S. 
Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement. 

And in the past three 
months, hundreds of state 
and local departments have 
inquired about similar 
efforts, said Robert J. Hines. 
who heads the program for 
the ICE. 

"When you are removing 
the criminal element from 
the community, it's hard to 
point a finger and say it's a 
bad thing." Hines said. 



The C 



7-Day Forecast 



ept. 28 - Oct. 



Local In-Depth Forecast 









THURSDAY 

T-stonns Likely 
High: 58 Low: 44 

FRIDAY 

few Showers 
High: 54 Low; 37 

SATURDAY 

Lew Showers 
High: 59 Low: 45 

SUNDAY 

Showers [jkely 
High: 61 Low; 43 

MONDAY 

Mostly Sunny 
High: 62 Low: 44 

TUESDAY 

Mostly Sunny 
High; 67 Low; 50 

WEDNESDAY 

Lew Showers 
Hiuh: 67 Low; 52 



Today we will see cloudy skies with a 90% 
chance of showers and thunderstorms, high 
temperature of 58", humidity of 80% and an 
overnight low of 44". The record high temper- 
ature for today is 77" set in 1971. The record 
low temperature is 31" set in 1964. Friday, 
skies will be mostly cloudy with a 40% chance 
of showers, high temperature of 54", humidity 
of 65% and an overnight low of 37". 



Local Almanac Last Week 



Pate Hi/Lo Normal Prccip 

Wednesday, 9/20 55/39 72/46 0.00" 

Thursday, 9 '21 62/37 72/46 0.00" 

Friday, 9 22 64/41 7245 O.OO" 

Saturday, 9/23 71/57 71/45 0.10" 

Sunday, 9/24 68/54 71/45 0.09" 

Monday. 9/25 62/48 70/44 O.Ol" 

Luesday. 9/26 64 44 70/44 0.00" 

Total rainfall last week 0.20" 

Normal rainfall last week 1.12" 

Departure from normal -0.92" 

Data reported from Du Bois-Jejferson County Airport 



Party Forecast 



Friday Nig ht 

Clear 

Temps: Lower 40s 
Precip Chance: 0% 
Saturday .Nig ht 

Showers Likely 
Temps: Upper 40s 
Precip Chance: 60% 





Weather Trivia 



What is the diffeivnce between 
hurricane and a typhoon? 



? 



uooi|dA'i 
ClUn.-lUJIH) V. Mynn,! UJ.-5IVC.-1 .141 ll| IIOIIR.W 



Moon Phases 



V, pOIIlM SI 




ik : 




9/30 10/6 10/13 10/22 

t 2006. .4i. ccsswealhcrcom. hu. 




The Clarion Call provides a synopsis of all criminal 
investigations as conducted by the Clarion University 
Public Safety for the month of September 2006. 
All information can be accessed on the Public Safety 
Web page. 

■ Joseph Arnato, 23, of Corsica, Pa., has charges pend- 
ing for a DUI after he was stopped on Main Street for 
crossing the center line several times on Sept. 21 at 
2:21 a.m. Arnato failed sobriety checks and PBT. 
Charges are pending blood results. 

■ Sept. 17, an unknown individual egged a vehicle in 
parking lot 8. Video tapes are being reviewed. 

■ Vanessa Gabler, 22, of St. Marys, Pa., was cited for 
public drunkenness while attending a concert in Tippin 
Gym. 

■ Clifford Park, 20. of Summerville, Pa., was observed 
staggering in Tippin Gym during a concert. Park was 
found to be under the infleunce of alcohol and was cited 
for underage consumption and public drunkenness. 

■ Laurie Grieshober, 18, of Erie, Pa., was cited for 
underage consumption on Sept. 15 while in Nair Hall. 

■ Paul Duris II, 18, of Erie, Pa., was cited for underage 
consumption on Sept. 15 while in Nair HaU. 

■ Timothy Novi, 18, of Monroeville, Pa., was cited for 
underage consumption on Sept. 15 while in Nair Hall. 

■ Lee Barclay, 20, of Derrick City, Pa., was cited for 
underage consumption and public drunkenness on 
Sept. 15. PoUce were called to Wilkinson Hall and saw 
Barclay staggering and noticed slurred speech and 
blood shot eyes, and a strong odor of alcohol. 

■ Zachary Karcz, 18, of Monaca, Pa., has been charged 
with an underage consumption on Sept. 15. 




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September 28. 2006 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 3 



1 



im 



Reservations recommendecl for symposium 



Natalie Kennell 
Oarior) Call Staff Writer 

s_nekennel@clarlon.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 27 - 
Clarion University will host 
Hip-Hop: The Politics of 
Morality symposium on Oct. 
18 in the Gemmell Student 
Center. 

Student panelists for 
the symposium are Matt 
Allen, freshman, informa- 
tion systems; Emmanuel 
Jones, junior, speech com- 
munication; and Michelle 
Williams, sophomore, eco- 
nomics major. 

Tm seeing an excite- 
ment among students, espe- 
cially those who have volun- 
teered to work on the sym- 
posium, said communication 
professor and symposium 
organizer. Dr. Joanne 
Washington. "This has real- 
ly been an exercise in 
human relations as stu- 
dents, including several 
returning adults, from vari- 
ous backgrounds, are com- 
ing together and working 
towards a common goal." 

Guests, Bakari Kitwana 
and Akiba Solomon's will 
have a book signing session 
at 1:30 p.m. and their books 
will also be sold on location. 

Students are still able to 
volunteer their time for the 
symposium by attending the 
mandatory meeting Sept. 28 
at 6 p.m. in room 124 in 
Becker. There are several 
different areas of interest 
volunteers may choose to be 
involved in such as guest 
services, high school discus- 
sion leaders, hospitality, 
information services, logis- 
tics, multimedia, publicity, 



and registration. 

Student volunteers are 
also able to gain co-curricu- 
lar credit for their involve- 
ment. 

"I believe faculty who 
participate in the sympo- 
sium with their students 
will gain an appreciation of 
the convergence of hiphop 
and their disciplines," 
Washington said. "Certainly 
hip-hop has had a great eco- 
nomic, cultural and political 
impact on mainstream 
America." 

The symposium is free 
and open to the public, how- 
ever, you must reserve your 
seat on the Web site, 
http://jupiter,clarion.edu/~hi 
phopsymp. Information per- 
taining to reservation of 
seats can also be obtained 
by e-mail at 

hiphopsymp@clarion.edu or 
at 814-393-1883. 

The deadline to reserve 
seats is Oct. 11. 

Attendees will include 
high school students, teach- 
ers, university students, fac- 
ulty, and community mem- 
bers. The expected atten- 
dance is around 500 people 
at each session. 

The goal of the sympo- 
sium is to ultimately incor- 
porate Hip-Hop tactics into 
a classroom setting. 
Stanford University, Kansas 
State University, the 
University of Rhode Island, 
Northeastern University, 
and Oakland University are 
some of the universities that 
have already pioneered this 
vision. 

Public schools across 
America use Hip-Hop to 
teach such subjects as Social 
Studies and English. Native 



American and other indige- 
nous groups use Hip-Hop to 
communicate their culture 
and connect with their 
youth. 

Several grants have 
been issued to support the 
symposium including Tho 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education. Office 
of the Chancellor and a 
Three-Year Presidential 
Advancement Award along 
with Dr. Marite Haynes, Or 
Jamie Phillips. Dr. Sandra 
Trejos and Michael Torres, 
As well. Dr. Wa.shington, 
Merrilyn Dunlap and Blair 
Betts wrote a grant to bring 
minority student leaders 
from regional high schools 
to the event. Financial sup- 
port was also received from 
the Department of 

Communication, Black 

Student Union. Martin 
Luther King Jr. Committee, 
The Edna R. Brown 
Community Program Fund. 
Women's Studies, 

Presidential Commission on 
Human Relations. College of 
Arts and Sciences. Office of 
the Dean. Office of the 
President and Office of the 
Provost. 

Students should begin 
to see posters up around 
campus. Bill Reese, a gradu- 
ate student in the communi- 
cation department is design- 
ing the website. Students 
are able to sign up for the 
symposium at hiphop- 
sympw^clarion.edu. Senior, 
communication major, 

Jenna Angelos, designed an 
informational brochure that 
will be available soon. 

"In general, anyone who 
has an interest in Hip-Hop 
will find something of inter- 





Tlmt 


Erml 


8:30 a.m. - 7:00 
p.m. 


Registration (Closed for Lunch and Dmner) and 
Art Show 


10:00-11:30 


Secsion One Hip-Hop, I AM a Cultural mid 
EcotiomicExplonoii - William Devlin (V'iCfi' 
President, Independetice Ptamtmg Group and FounOer, 
Urinn Famty Council), LtsaElhs (Presidmt, Smy 
UrUn Musk), Bakari Kitwana {co-faiftder of me 
Nationai Hjp-Hop PolUwaJ Corivottton, Marcyliena 
Morgan (Professor, Dept. of Communicatioiv 
Founder and Director cfthe HrpHop ArcJwes, 
Stanford Urtrv.), Emmanueljones (/wwwr, Cfarton 
Unn/.) 


11:30-12:00 p.m. 


Break- out Sessions 


12:00-1 i30 


Lunch Break (on your own) and Student 
Performances 


1:302:00 


Break 


2:00-3:33 


ScMionTwo: Hip-Hop, I AM Image, Identity 
And Moral Choices -MonicaHaynes 
(Entertamment Columntsi Pittsburgh Pcst-Qizea^, 
GaryHortor^ {President, ErwUrfxin Corrmiuntty 
D«w7c^m«??i Corp,) Bakari Kitwana^ Akiba 
Solomon {Former Senior Editor, Vibe Vuen Mag), 
Matt Allen {Freshman, Cianon Unrv. ) Michelle 
Williams (So;pffomor^ Cianon Untv,) 


3:30-4:00 


Break-Out Sessions 


4:00-6:00 


Student Performances 


6£i0-7:00 


Dinner Break (o«yo«r aum) 


7^)0-8:30 


Scwion Three Hip Hop, I AM Media Influence 
amdthc Voice of Hip-Hop 

J eff ) ohns n ( Political expert and host of The Jeff 
Johnson Chromcles, BET) and Questlove, ( Tfie Roots) 



est," said Washington. groups and individuals are Team, the HipHop Team 

In addition to the speak- performing including David and KUDETS, a new unr 

ers and organized discus- Banks, Mike Barron. Adam versity step team group, 

sions, several student Evans, the Clarion Dance 



Alpha Phi Omega hosts 
eighth annual Food Stock 



Krystal Finkbeiner 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_knfinkbein@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 27 - On 
Sept. 29-30 Clarion 
Universities Co-ed 

Fraternity, Alpha Phi 
Omega, will host the 8th 
annual Food Stock event. 

This event will be held 
outside the courthouse for 
24 hours and will benefit 
less fortunate families. 

This year Alpha Phi 
Omega, a community serv- 
ice Co-ed fraternity, will be 
the organizing Food Stock. 

Sophomore and 

President of Alpha Phi 
Omega, Oliva Osche, is run- 
ning the evont this year. 

"Clarion Ministries, 
Charitable Deeds, Clarion 
Gun Owners have done this 
in the past and are very 
excited about helping out 



again," said Osche. 
Alpha Phi Omega has been 
working with other fraterni- 
ties, sororities and local 
shops to get them involved 
in the event. 

"Many organizations are 
involved in this event. Alpha 
Sigma Tau, Student Honors 
Association, Cub Scouts and 
many more have been a very 
big help in pulling together 
a huge beneficial project for 
others," said Osche. 

According to Osche, 
many of the surrounding 
communities will help col- 
lect monetary and non-per- 
ishable food items. 

"Organizations from the 
University volunteered to 
pass out bags throughout 
the community on Monday, 
Sept. 25 these bags go to 
local shops and homes 
throughout the Clarion com- 
munity who agreed to par- 
ticipate. These bags will 



then be picked up on Sept. 
27," said Osche. 

Although Food Stock is 
going to be held in Clarion 
the surrounding communi- 
ties! Knox. Strattanville. 
and Sligo, are participating 
and are a huge help accord- 
ing to Osche. 

"Other organizations 
and individuals volunteer to 
work the actual event on 
Friday they are doing two 
hour increments" said. 
Osche. 

"I am looking forward to 
participating in this event. 1 
think it is awesome that col- 
lege students can finally 
give back to their communi- 
ty, even if it is only two 
hours, families in need will 
really appreciate it." said 
sophomore and Sigma Alpha 
Iota member. Carrie Vatter. 

"I think that this event 
is very important to the 
Clarion Area. Manv families 



will be fortunate to receive 
items donated by this event 
1 beUeve that the support of 
the community is one of the 
most important things in 
making this a successful 
event" said Vatter. 

Sophomore, Ashley 
Rodgers said. "We're going 
to feed America, if we keep 
this food drive going 
strong." 

"I believe this project 
brings the community closer 
to the University as we 
work for one common goal," 
said Rodgers. 

"We [Alpha Phi Omega] 
are very thankful to all of 
the organizations that are 
willing to help," said Osche. 
"Every little bit is greatly 
appreciated and each bit of 
help is what makes this 
event successful with the 
help of the surrounding 
community, this event is 
sure to be a success." 



Ensle named 
assistant to 
executive dean 



Counseling services offer aicoliol 
screenings in Cliandier dining iiaii 



Kelly Pennisi 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kpennisi@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 27 - On 
Oct. 2 volunteer alcohol 
screenings will take place 
at Clarion University in 
Chandler Dining Hall 
between 10:30 a.m. and 
2^30 p.m. by counselors 
from the Department of 
Counseling Services. 

The screenings will be 



done by the counselors, 
Mary Ann Fricko, Jason 
Braun, and Kay King. 

Students may also take 
the screening tests online 
on Clarion's online counsel- 
ing homepage. 

The screenings will take 
place before A.L.F. because 
there is more concern sur- 
rounding drinking. 

The screening process will 
be a questionnaire. 

The questions will 
cover various topics about 



the consumption of alcohol. 
The students will receive 
the results within 10 min- 
utes of completing the 
screening. After the stu- 
dents have gone through 
the screening they will 
receive the results in about 
ten minutes. If for some 
reason, students are reluc- 
tant to receive their results 
in person, they can go 
online and obtain their 
results. 

Senior, Rvan Eisenman 



said. "I guess if it's volun- 
teer-based then it's a good 
idea." 

Once the tests are 
scored students can ask 
additional questions if they 
wish to do so. The coun- 
selors can also then refer 
people to other counseling 
services in the county. 

Freshman Rachel 

Mackey said, "I think it's a 
good idea to make students 
more aware if they have 
alcohol problems." 



Shakira O'Neil 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_sjoneil@clarion.edu 

CLARION. Sept. 27 - Kay 
Ensle. a life long Oil City 
resident and community 
service advocate, has been 
named the assistant to the 
executive dean at the 
Venango campus. 

She will work with aca- 
demic colleagues to manage 
campus academic budgets 
and advocate the develop- 
ment of new programs to 
meet regional needs. 

"The assistant to the 
Executive Dean position will 
enable me to develop new 
skills and sharpen the ones 
that 1 already have in a 
brand new environment," 
said Ensle. "As a member of 
the management team, I 
look forward to supporting 
the overall growth and 
development of Venango 
Campus. My immediate 
goal is to become familiar 
with my new position 
responsibilities as soon as 
possible." 

Mrs. Ensle has a very 
impressive track record as 
community member of Oil 
city. She attended Oil City 
Area High School, and 
received a master of library 
science degree from Clarion 
University. She was pre- 
voiusly an elementary 
school teacher for the 
Franklin Area School 
District and also served as 
the assistant library direc- 
tor for the Oil City library. 
In addition to being success- 



ful career wise she is also a 
community service advo- 
cate. 

"My former position as 
the director of the Oil City 
Library for over 20 years 
helped me to prepare skills 
that are transferable to 
many of the responsibilities 
of my position." said Ensle. 
"My colleagues will be very 
helpful as 1 transition to the 
academic environment! 1 
look forward to being a part 
of the exciting things that 
are happening at the 
Venango campus." 

Ensle is involved in a 
number of community serv- 
ice organizations such as 
the First Book of Venango 
County, American Red 
Cross, Venango County 
Association for the Blind, 
United Way of Venango 
County and the Venango 
County Humane Society. 

She also received the Oil 
City Area Jaycees 

Distinguished Service 

Award in 1984. 

The Venango campus is 
the oldest regional campus 
in the Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher 

Education. 

"Venango campus is 
committed to meeting the 
needs of the community," 
said Ensle. "The small cam- 
pus atmosphere is extreme- 
ly conductive to learning 
and the faculty and staff are 
top notch individuals with a 
shared vision of making the 
campus a center of excel- 
lence. It is an honor to join 
the Venango Campus team." 



Page 4 



Tffi CLARION CALL 



September 28. 2006 



lfiii$t 



Editorial liellers lo the Editor and I iill on \m 



I believe in a tiling caiied love 




Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_smdesmoncl@clarion.edu 

We all know them, the 
guys with the lines and the 
smooth" moves, the ones who 
make girls feel like they're 
special. Then, a year later, 
when she hasn't heard from 
him since the night they 
spent together, she runs into 
a girl with whom she has a 
lot in common^ they were 
both played. 

These players (and play 
erettes for that matter) are 
in it for some kind of sexual 
pleasure. They avoid any 
type of serious relationship 
and decide that they are bet- 
ter off without the "hassles" 
of a significant other. 

To them, I say you have 
a whole lot to learn. 

RewindtoOct. 21, 2002. 
as two teenagers anxiously 
sit at computers in their 
houses across town. After a 
bit of awkward banter, the 
guy asks the girl to be his 
girlfriend. She makes him 
squirm a bit then gladly 
accepts. 

That girl was me and 
the guy was David, ray 
boyfriend of almost four 
years now. We finished high 
school together, moved into 
college together and enjoyed 
every minute of it. 

When I tell people how 
long I've been with Dave, I 
get one of three answers. 

The first typically comes 
from adults. They shake 
their head disapprovingly 
and follow with some sort of 
lecture. A few of them ask 
questions, attempting to 
sound truly interested, but 
are usually just trying to fig- 
ure out if I'm a complete 
idiot or not. 

Second come those who 
are also currently in rela- 



tionships. Their responses 
go something like this, 
"Aww! That's so cute!" 

And last are the 
responses that stem from 
the fact that these people 
are having no luck in the 
love department: "You 
suck!" 

After dealing with the 
first response for the past 
four years from family, 
teachers and co-workers, I 
have gotten used to it. 
Usually I smile at them and 
shrug my shoulders, send- 
ing the signal that I don't 
really care what they say. 

I always brush off their 
disapproval, I but it really 
makes me think about why 
most adults are never in 
favor of me having such a 
serious relationship at my 
age. 

Many times they think I 
should be out experiencing 
the many wonders of dating. 
As much as they may want 
me to have a run-in with the 
many players out there, I 
think I'll pass. 

But, I think deep down 
no one believes we can real- 
ly know what love is at such 
a young age. With the 
uncertainty of anything 
dealing with love these 
days, I find that many peo- 
ple believe a relationship 
between adults is inevitably 
doomed, and one between 
teenagers is a ticking time 
bomb. 

What gives a man or 
woman in their 30s so much 
more certainty than Dave 
and I have? 

We are now young 
adults who met when we 
were only 15 years old. I 
believe I can safely say no 
one knew we would last this 
long, aside from Dave and 
me of course. 

The age of 15 typically 
starts the dating stage in a 



teenager's life. Guys and 
girls alike go from partner 
to partner, looking for that 
"special something." I just 
found mine the first try. 

Some will argue that one 
has to meet multiple people 
to really know what that is, 
so over time they know what 
they want. 

But, with all of the 
emphasis on women being 
independent and empow- 
ered, why is it so hard to 
believe that I know that I 
found what I want in the 
man I've been with for such 
a long time? 

A human being of any 
sex and any age should 
know what they want to 
begin with. Just as one 
should not change for anoth- 
er, they shouldn't change 
what they want based on 
who they meet. 

In fact, according to a 
study done by the 
University of Minnesota, 
teenagers who had multiple 
relationships from the ages 
of 15-17 were more likely to 
have troubled marriages. 

So far, I've learned 
about putting my partner's 
needs over my own, that not 
everything is worth battling 
over and that laughter is the 
best medicine for any pain. 
And that's only the start. 

If I've learned that all 
already, I can only imagine 
what I'll learn in the next 
four years. 

A lot of the time, the dis- 
approving ones are giving 
their advice based off of 
their experiences in life. 
They believe because they 
were divorced or ended up 
hurt in the long run, I will 
turn out the same way. 

When visiting an elemen- 
tary school teacher my sen- 
ior year, we began to talk 
about my upcoming college 
experience. She had gone to 
Clarion, too, and met her 
husband there. Well, ex- 
husband by then. 

Upon finding out that I 
planned to continue my 
relationship with Dave 
while I was at school, the 
looks of disapproval began. 

She warned me against 
staying with him through 
college and encouraged me 
to explore my options. 



Obviously, I didn't take her 
advice, but the only reason 
she advised against it was 
her recent divorce. 

I will never understand 
how a person can believe 
that just because their rela- 
tionship ended in failure 
means mine will, too. 

Basically, my teacher 
believes her college experi- 
ence wasn't as good as it 
could've been because of her 
relationship. 

I truly believe mine has 
only been better because of 
Dave. He is there for me 
when I need him, calms me 
down when I get stressed 
and encourages me to follow 
my own path. 

Dave has become my 
best friend, and it's amazing 
to know that I have someone 
I fully trust with me. 

He has been there 
through some of the most 
difficult times in my life and 
guided me through all of 
them. He is my confidant 
with whom I can come to 
with everything. 

When I want to have 
fun, I can look to him. When 
I want to cry, he's always 
there to tickle it out of me. 
When I'm being difficult, he 
confronts me. When I think 
of love, I think of him. 

So, to all of the players 
out there who think their 
lives are better without 
someone special with them, 
I hope that special someone 
comes along who changes 
everything, and shows what 
I have is possible and amaz- 
ing. 

And to all of those who 
disapprove of my decision to 
pursue a long-term relation- 
ship, I ask them to look at 
how happy I am and explain 
why I should've given up on 
love. I beUeve love is pure 
and true, and I found that 
with Dave. 

Sure, there have been 
arguments and heartache, 
but that doesn't cancel out 
yvhat we have deep down. It 
may sound a bit cliche, but 
even if it ends tomorrow, I 
wouldn't trade the past four 
years for anything in the 
world. 

The author is a sophomore 
communication major and 
Features Editor of The Call. 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 QommeU ^u(tont Comptex 

Clarion Unhwr^ of P»nnsylvania 

Ciailon. PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fw: 814 303-2857 

\W^: darioncall.darton.^tu Email: call9clarton.«Ai 



Executive Board 
2006-2007 




Clarion Students: 

Are you aware of traffic rules? 



It seems to me that the 
students of Clarion 
University have a problem 
understanding that lighted 
hand on the crosswalk 
signs. On any given day if 
you watch the crosswalk at 
the intersection of 

Greenville Avenue and Main 
Street you will see this. The 
students there daily' run, 
and walk in front of vehi- 
cles. One of these days 
someone is going to hit the 
gas instead of the brake. As 
per Pennsylvania. CODE., a 
pedestrian suddenly leaving 
the curb or other place of 
safety and walk or run into 
the path of a vehicle is a 
violation of the law. If you 
cannot get out of the cross- 
walk before the vehicle gets 
to the intersection, you are 
in violation of the law. I 
think it is time for the 
Clarion Police to start hand- 
ing out citations for this vio- 
lation. These students do 
cause a hazard. It is only a 
matter of time that death or 




serious injury will result. I ' 
you think you are invincible 
students, think again. It 
seems these students do not 
know what common sense 
is. I would invite the par- 
ents of these children to 
watch the intersection and 
see if your children are part 
of the problem. I think that 
the parents should stay in 
Clarion, hold their little 
boys and girls hand and 
walk them across the street. 
Looks like they neglected to 
do this when they were 
younger. Also with this is a 
copy of the PA. CODE con- 
cerning crosswalks. 



Section 3542 - Right of 
Way of Pedestrians in 
Crosswalks 

Greneral Rule - When 



traffic control signals are 
not in place or not in opera- 
tion, the driver of a vehicle 
shall yield the right of way 
to a pedestrian crossing the 
roadway within any marked 
crosswalk or within any 
unmarked crosswalk at an 
intersection. 

Exercise of Care by 
Ped^trians - No pedestrian 
shall suddenly leave a curb 
or other place of safety and 
walk or run into the path of 
a vehicle which is so close as 
to constitute a hazard. 

Limitation on Vehicles 
Passing - Whenever any 
vehicle is stopped at an 
intersection or at any 
marked crosswalk to permit 
a pedestrian to cross the 
roadway, the driver of any 
other vehicle approaching 
from the rear shall not over- 
take and pass the stopped 
vehicle. 
• W.J. Cheke 
SHIPPENVILLE,PA. 



Lindsay Grystar, 
Edltor4n-Chl^ 

Tina Stckier, 
Managing Editor 

Brtttnee Koebler, 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desmond, 
Features Editor 

Eric Bowser, 
Sports E&\tm 




Amy Kaylor, 
Business Man 



IMichaei Balchin, 
Ad Sales IManager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
Photos & Graphics EdI 

Josh Doran, 
Online Editor 

Sarah Dent,<^ 
Entertainment Editor 



Dr. Susan Hilton 
Adviser 

Steff 

Natalie Kennell, Kelly Penniai, Adam Mohmr)'. 
Shakira O'Neil, Krystai Finkbetner Pattus^ DanMIt 
Btttctierlne, Deldra Horralt, Nicole ymlaax^i 
En i e rteto me H fc Domlnk; Gtaitombardo, Emily Aaron, Mf^ 
6ray, Grace Regalado ipiCtK Chrla Parks, Mich«»l 
Wat^toe, Kateiyn Monreim, Robert Rankin 
Mk^eie Straub, Nicole Bovairci, Adrienne Cain i 
Lauren Couch, Courtney Krol, Jenna Rsno, MWm SmMi 
Burtnens Sarab StetekJ, Stephanie Corao, Shewn 'nirner, 
Ben Etitot Phat^Mfhw an^&mfMm Betbany ftoss, mm 
Cauvel, Misba Snyder, Jenifer PotMe^. Pb« Oralick, Thomas 
Fair ClreuiaBfli^ Eric Levy, Allison ftorr, Nteole Lawrence, 
Jobn Biumer, Ryan Brtc^, Bryan Bifv^am, Stove Cotmr 

Policies 

The aarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Qarton 
UnSveisft/ of f^nnsylvanfa and the surfwwJIfig comnwnitles. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during ttie a<»defn(c year. 

The Editors accept subrmsaiofts from aS sourees, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, ter^^h, punctuation and obscert- 
i^ the detBRTiinatlon of which is the responslbBJ^ of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information, 
Th^ must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondi^. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anofw^ous, the^ muat attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes {including PSAs) are pubifeh^ only bas«d 
on availabte sface and at the discretion of the Ewcutive Board, 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricuiar 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsh 
bWtties for the entire semester will be g^nted a co-cun-icular 

The Clarion Call Is funded t>y advertising revenue and Hie 
Clarion Students' tesociation. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
cow is free; additional copies are $1.00. 

■ Opinions expressed In this 
fHJbllcatlon are those of the writer or 
spmlmr, and do not necessartfy reftect 
the opinions of the nempaper staff, stu- 
dent body, Clarion Unlver^ or the ^xm- 
munlty. 





T Last we^'s artswer: tlppln^SyfrT 



September 28, 2006 



TfflEL CLAHION CALL 



Page 5 



Editorial \^s In ik Eililiir and I all on yiiii 



ltiii$i 

Pandora has got a hold on me 




Adrienne Cain 
Columnist 

s acam@clarion.edu 



So 1 don't think I am 
being overly paranoid, but 1 
am pretty sure that 
Pandora.com has got a 
grudge against me. 

For those of you not in 
the know, Pandora.com is 
the sweetest place to con- 
nect to music on the net. You 
fire up your little Firefox 
and point it to Pandora.com 



and then... listen to the 
radio! Okay, that may not 
sound all that dramatic or 
interesting, but it is. 
Pandora is not just any sta- 
tion. What Pandora allows 
you to do is specify an artist 
or song then it creates a 
radio station around that 
sound just for you based 
upon your thumbs-up or 
thumbs-down ratings of the 
songs. 

Granted, Pandora is as 
of yet unable to sort music 
based on their lyrical con- 
tent, only on their sound. So 
while you may type in 
"Dresden Dolls" and wind 
up with something sassy 
and lyrically fun like "Coin- 
Operated Boy," Pandora 
could spitefully lead you 
away until you end up in 
"Pussycat Dolls" land with a 
Q-Tip in your ear trying to 
take out your eardrum. The 
chances of this are pretty 
slim, though, and so as far 



as it goes. Pandora is a pret- 
ty solid deal. 

Probably the nicest 
thing that Pandora does is 
introduce you to new music. 
You put in your popular 
band: "Panic! At the Disco"," 
My Chemical Romance"," 
Kanye West"," Andrew 
Bird"," OK Go" or whoever it 
is you listen to and let the 
station introduce you to sim- 
ilar sounds by artists you 
never knew existed. My 
favorite part of that deal is 
the fact that Pandora does- 
n't just limit itself to 
American music, some of my 
favorite European and 
Japanese artists are show- 
cased as well. 

With such a glowing 
report of Pandora, you prob- 
ably think I'm totally in love 
with the service. Well, yes, 
usually Pandora is totally 
my favorite boyfriend. 

Lately, however I've 
been getting the feeling like 



Pandora has it out for me. 
I've got something like 
twenty radio stations span- 
ning several genres with a 
few song specific stations 
thrown in. 

I have a "Kristen 
Chenoweth" station simply 
so I can hear her song 
"Taylor the Latte Boy." 
Currently I am stuck on one 
station devoted to the remix 
of Garbage's "Cherry Lips 
(Go Baby Go)." 

Unfortunately, that one 
song is the major crowning 
point of the station. The rest 
of the station is a steady 
stream of dance music in a 
quantity enough to make 
you vomit glitter faster than 
a unicorn vomits rainbows. 

On the other hand, the 
station did play the song 
"Sigourney Weaver" by Edie 
Sedgwick, which is a hilari- 
ous song about the sexual 
tension (whether real or 
imagined) in the movie 



"Aliens." 

Despite the fact that 1 
beg Pandora on a regular 
basis to play the "Cherry 
Lips" remix, I only get to 
hear it every three to five 
days while it will play 
Daniel Beddingfield's "Gotta 
Get Thru This" four times a 
day. But, Oh!, I'm not bitter 
or anything. 

In fact, this enforced 
abstinence from the song 
only makes me like it more. 
As my roommate can attest, 
every time the song comes 
on there is a complete cessa- 
tion of all activity in the 
room so that I can crank the 
song at the top of the speak- 
ers and sing into my little 
karaoke mic. And no, there 
exists neither video nor pic- 
tures of that occurring so 
don't even ask. 

Ironically, and also most 
Ukely to make a liar of me, 
"Cherry Lips" remix played 
twice today. I assume that 



means it won't be playing 
for the next week or two. 
Most likely, as well, when I 
finally get sick of that song 
(read: the end is coming) it 
will play two or three times 
a day on the station in fur- 
ther mocking glory. 

So for now, 1 am 
embroiled in a love-hate 
relationship with the sta- 
tion that changes from love 
to hate quicker than a 
bulimic kid goes from eating 
a candy bar to praying to 
the porcelain god. Just 
when I'm about to call it 
quits and turn the station 
off (I mean it this time!). 
Pandora surprises me with 
something witty, nostalgic 
or generally desirable and I 
am back in front of it offer- 
ing up my undying love and 
devotion which makes me 
either fickle or masochistic. 
Quite frankly, that kind of 
disturbs me. 



Behind the scenes of Fall CampusFest 2006: 



Volunt00r-work or slave-work? 



Sheena M. Hoover 

s_smhoover@clarion.ectu 

"It was the absolute 
worst day of my life," said 
sophomore secondary edu- 
j cation earth and space sci- 
J . ence major, Suzann 
Pomraning. Promraning 
served on the Security 
Committee as a volunteer at 
this season's all-country 
CampusFest. The show fea- 
tured Gary Allan, Craig 
Morgan, and Jamie O'Neal. 

Fall CampusFest 2006 
started out just like any 
other CampusFest, despite 
being on a sunny day in 
September rather than a 
rainy day in April. So, why 




say, it was all set in motion 
by the lack of leadership. 

During the day, approxi- 
mately 150 volunteers from 
all different majors agreed 
to help out and turned in 
their student I.D.'s and sub- 
mitted to a $50 fee over 
their heads if they backed 




Bethany Ross/The Clarion Call 
CAMPUSFEST - Clarion held it's Fall 2006 CampusFest on , 
Sept. 17 in Tippin Gynri. 



then, did many students, 
along with Pomraning, 
leave the show feeling not 
only exhausted, but frus- 
trated, disrespected, and, 
for some, so angry they 
wanted to "kill" someone. 

There are a lot of 
answers to this question. 
Some people complained 
that it was just lazy volun- 
teers that left others to do 
the work. Others said it 
was being there from 6:30 
a.m. Sunday until 1:16 a.m. 
the next morning without 
being allowed to leave, 
except one 45 minute break, 
even though most the time 
they were told there was 
nothing for them to help 
with. Some of the concert 
chairs will say it was 
because no one did what 
they told them to do. But, 1 



out or left early. 

While most volunteers 
would be treated with the 
utmost respect and given 
breaks if there was down 
time, most volunteers only 
were allowed one 45 minute 
break in 18 hours and 45 
minutes. This is not 
because it took this entire 
time to prepare and put on 
the show — because there 
was downtime. 

After setting up Gary 
Allan's dressing room with 
two other girls and doing 
whatever was asked of us 
most of the morning, I asked 
University Activities Board 
President. Meredith 

Boldizar, at a little after one 
in the afternoon if there was 
anything else I could do. 
Personally, I was frustrated 
by the fact that many of the 



CampusFest chairs that 
were our leaders for the day 
were not helping us, and I 
was tired of sitting around 
waiting for something to 
help out with. Boldizar stat- 
ed that there wasn't much 
we could help out with until 
around 3:30 or so when the 
catering for the bands 
arrived. When I asked if I 
could leave for a little bit to 
do my homework for the 
next morning, she said no. 
Her reasoning was that if I 
was allowed to leave, then 
they would have to allow 
everyone to leave. But wait, 
if they didn't have anything 
for us to do for over two 
hours, and we were VOL- 
UNTEERING, then why 
shouldn't everyone be 
allowed to leave? My ques- 
tion exactly. 

However, a little later in 
the afternoon, while 
Boldizar and several 
CampusFest committee 
chairs of security or stage 
sat around and did nothing, 
I was asked to take out the 
pizza boxes. I did — after 
finishing my lunch. But, I, 
as well as other hospitality, 
stage, and security volun- 
teers started to wonder why 
the majority of UAB and 
CampusFest leaders were 
not doing anything them- 
selves? Were we just slaves 
to them? 

While most of the "lead- 
ers" got to watch the whole 
show, most all of the securi- 
ty volunteers and other vol- 
unteers did not see much of 
it. Two security volunteers 
were stuck at their security 
posts the entire show, while 
another had gotten sun- 
burned sitting outside most 
of the day. 

The problem with secu- 
rity was that many security 
volunteers left their posts to 



watch the show, and the rest 
were left to keep up the 
slack. This is after the 
chairs and co-chairs of the 
UAB CampusFest commit- 
tee got to meet and mingle 
with the different bands and 
performers, watch the 
entire show and most of 
them sat around and did 
nothing all day and espe- 
cially during the clean up 
and tearing down of the 
stage. And who was the 
first to leave the concert — if 
it wasn't the UAB President 
herself. 

Sophomore Suzann 
Pomraning also said to me, 
"We went in at 6:30 in the 
morning with the under- 
standing that they would 
try their hardest to help us 
watch as much of the show 
as possible, but we (another 
member of the security com- 
mittee and I) were stuck on 
top of the hill by Chandler 
for most of the night. We 
saw not even ten minutes of 
the show, while other com- 
mittee volunteers saw the 
entire thing. We were also 
treated with blatant disre- 
spect from the people in 
charge of our committees. 
This year was a drastic 
change from last year and 
all of the people that I 
talked to during the day 
said that they would never 
help out with CampusFest 
again." 

When asked how she 
felt in regards to the man- 
aging of the event, UAB 
Advisor, Jamie Bero, said, 
"There's always ways we 
can improve." However, 
overall she felt the leader- 
ship went well, and agreed 
that in the future there 
would be more people on the 
security committee to help 
out, and less on the hospi- 
tality committee. She also 
confirmed that there are 
plans for a Spring 
CampusFest and that she is 
"95 percent sure" it will be a 
rock show. 

Bero also confirmed that 
there will be re-elections for 
new chairs of all the 
CampusFest committees for 
the next CampusFest. She 
was not aware that anyone 
was dissatisfied with the 
concert, concertgoers or vol- 



unteers. However, she 
asked that any students 
who had a problem with the 
show to find her and discuss 
it with her. Having learned 
what I did from the show 
and hearing how dissatis- 
fied many of the other vol- 
unteers were, I suggest that 
anyone who felt disrespect- 
ed should take Bero up on 
her offer. 

So, what do 1 recom- 
mend be changed in the 
spring? First of all, every- 
one involved in managing 
the event should participate 
just as much in setting up 
and tearing down the con- 
cert. I believe this is called 
leadership by example. If 
those who are telling you 
what to do aren't doing any- 
thing, then how can you be 
motivated? Second, it 
should be less about people 
bossing other people 
around, and more of a learn- 
ing experience. After all, 
Constance Anderson, 

Freshman Music Business 
Major who volunteered on 
the Stage Committee, said, 
"CampusFest 2006 was 
something 1 joined to learn 
more of the behind the 
scenes aspect of a concert. 
But, unfortunately, I only 
walked away from the expe- 
rience learning what not to 
do. The event in my mind 
was unorganized and some 
(not all) of the committee 
chairs, I believe, failed to 
show leadership and only 
treated the volunteers as 
slaves." 

If the concert is a learn- 



ing experience, why not let 
the volunteers in on other 
aspects of organizing a con- 
cert than just barking 
orders at them? Even 
telling them how to put 
together a stage or how a 
concert performer is booked 
would be sufficient enough. 

I interned at a record 
label this summer, and from 
that experience 1 could have 
brought a lot to the organi- 
zation of the event. In fact, 
the only reason I helped out 
on the hospitality committee 
was because I wanted to 
learn more, not just to meet 
the bands as some people 
did. 1 don't even listen to 
much country. 

Third, if there is down 
time in between tasks, let 
volunteers go home and 
take a nap or work on home- 
work for a couple of hours. 
This was done last Pring at 
CampusFest when Ludacris 
performed, as well as when 
Our Lady Peace and Theory 
of a Deadman played. 

And lastly, I can only 
hope that the new commit- 
tee chairs who are elected, 
as well as the existing UAB 
leaders and CampusFest 
Chairs who will still be in 
power, improve their leader- 
ship skills and make 
CampusFest a worthwhile 
experience in the Spring. 

This being my last 
semester, I won't be here to 
see that happen, so I can 
only hope this article will 
make a difference and these 
mistakes will not be repeat- 
ed again. 




Phil Drellck/TTie Clarion Call 
CM^PUSFEST - The 2006 Fall CampusFest featured Gary 
Allan, Craig Morgan and Jamie O'Neal. 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



September 28. 2006 



Feitms 

Pharos Scholars help preserve Clarion's history 



Deidra Horrell 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_dlhorrell@clarion.edu 

Dr. Todd Pfannestiel. 
associate professor of histo- 
ry and advisor to the 
History Club and the Phi 
Alpha Theta History Honor 
Society, has a vision of pre- 
serving the history of 
Clarion and its students. 
Through the Pharos 
Scholars program and the 
Clarion University History 
Project, Todd Pfannestiel's 
vision is becoming even 
clearer. 

Throughout the fall 
semester, students in 
Pfannestiel's History 121: 
"America since 1877" course 
will be participating in a 
project geared toward docu- 
menting their experiences 
on campus. Students are 
required to take a minimum 
of 20 photographs that 
depict college life through 
their eyes. A total of 55 stu- 
dents are enrolled in the 
program and will be partak- 



ing in the photo-essay proj- 
ect this semester. 

Perusing through year- 
books dating back prior to 
the 1970s at the library is 
the first step students will 
take. As pictures spark their 
interest, students will 
record a brief summary of 
the photo, the individuals' 
names that may appear in 
the picture as well as the 
yearbook in which it was 
found. Ten pictures total 
must be chosen from the 
yearbooks and need to rep- 
resent every decade, from 
the 1910s to the 1960s. No 
more than two photos can be 
chosen from one yearbook, 
and students must keep in 
mind that academics, ath- 
letics, extra-curriculars, stu- 
dent life and the physical 
setting of Clarion need to be 
apparent among the 10 pic- 
tures they choose. 

Once each student 
decides on 10 pictures from 
the yearbooks, he or she 
then must capture 10 pic- 
tures of his own that repli- 
cate the pictures the stu- 



dent chose. The remaining 
10 pictures can be of any 
aspect of the university that 
the student desires. 

"Many are surprised to 
learn that Clarion no longer 
produces yearbooks-the last 
one was printed in the year 
2000," Pfannestiel said. 
"Therefore, I thought this 
would be a perfect opportu- 
nity to encourage students 
to take photographs docu- 
menting their first year at 
Clarion University, as well 
as connect their experiences 
to those of our alumni." 

At the completion of this 
photo-essay, students will 
submit their photos to their 
professor including the date 
of when the picture was 
taken, names of individuals 
in the picture and a short 
description of what is occur- 
ring. From there, 
Pfannestiel will compile 
each student's photo-essay 
into one class presentation. 
The overall project will be 
burned onto CDs and pro- 
vided to students during 
their spring semester. 



As for students' reac- 
tions to the project, 
Pfannestiel feels that most 
are excited. 

"To realize that you will 
be documenting your experi- 
ences as students at Clarion 
University in the year 2006- 
2007 in order for students 
50 years from now to review 
them is a very attractive 
project," he said. 

In addition to preserv- 
ing "current students' 
Clarion University experi- 
ences through the photos 
they take," Pfannestiel also 
hopes that this project will 
"connect our current stu- 
dents to the history of this 
institution through their 
review of past yearbooks." 

The photo-essay that 
students are currently 
working on is only a part of 
the continual history project 
on campus. The project has 
been around for about a 
year now, but began to 
develop near the end of last 
spring. Any student, regard- 
less of major, interested in 
efforts to preserve the histo- 




Thomas Fair/The Clarion Call 
Preserving Clarion's history - Dr. Todd Pfannestiel is working 
with students to mai<e additions to the CUP History Project. 



ry of Clarion is welcome to 
partake in the history proj- 
ect. Much help is still need- 
ed to ensure that this proj- 
ect continues to be a suc- 
cess. 

"The most significant 
element at this time is the 
oral history project, through 
which current students 
interview Clarion alumni 
from the 1920's to the pres- 



ent," Pfannestiel said. "We 
need help conducting inter- 
views, preserving artifacts 
and documents, web page 
design, newsletter editing 
and many other tasks." 

With the combined 
efforts of the Pharos stu- 
dents as well as those 
involved with the history 
project, Clarion's history is 
in good hands. 



Businesses attract students and customers at expo 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond@clarion.edu 

On Sept. 27, the Clarion 
Community and University 
Business Expo was held in 
the Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room. 

Among the 18 different 
businesses and service 
organizations scheduled to 
attend were Clarion Cycles, 
Accidental Artist, Monroe 
Muffler and The Fulmer 
House. 

Tables were set up 
throughout the room, one 
for each business to display 
a presentation to let stu- 



dents know about their 
business. Some gave out 
promotional items and pam- 
phlets; AAA Life Services 
offered homemade cookies. 

The expo was organized 
by graduate student Josh 
Zorich. 

During an internship at 
Clarion this summer, Zorich 
casually discussed local 
businesses with a colleague 
and realized how difficult it 
is for businesses to get in 
touch with the students. 

"Businesses have a 
problem getting to students 
and breaking through the 
University walls, especially 
nonprofit organizations," 
said Zorich. So, he decided 
to arrange the business expo 



on campus. 

"My boss told me to try 
to get to x-number of busi- 
nesses a day. I thought that 
I would get to every busi- 
ness within a week. But 
when I went out, there were 
so many businesses I didn't 
even know were there," said 
Zorich. 

With the wide variety of 
businesses at the expo, stu- 
dents were able to realize 
just how much Clarion has 
to offer. 

Jennifer Dunkle, owner 
of Your Special Day: 
Scrapbooking and Paper 
Craft Supplies, came to the 
event to let students know 
about her store. 

"I wanted to let students 



know we exist. It's hard 
because of where our build- 
ing is set," said Dunkle. 

Your Special Day offers 
an array of products as well 
as classes for beginners to 
intermediate scrapbookers 
and as fun themed sessions. 

Dunkle also hoped to 
appeal to groups on campus 
at the expo. 

"A lot of sororities and 
groups do scrapbooking and 
come through the store," she 
said. 

Nonprofit and service 
organizations were also in 
attendance at the event to 
inform students of the serv- 
ices available to them. 

One such organization 
was Clarion County's 



Promise, Inc. Their mission 
is to provide youth with the 
"Five Promises:" a healthy 
start, safe places, caring 
adults, opportunities to 
serve and marketable skills. 

They also provide 
events in the community 
such as Christmas gift 
wrapping at the Clarion 
Mall, ATV Safety Fair and 
Spotlight on Clarion 
County's Promise, which 
featured Miss Pennsylvania 
last year. 

According to Cathy 
Simpson a parent educator 
with Clarion County's 
Promise, "It's one of the best 
programs Clarion 

Community has to offer." 

They were also there to 



recruit volunteers for their 
programs and to let the pub- 
lic know that they are there. 

"We wanted to make the 
public aware of what is out 
there and accessible to 
them. They don't realize 
what's out there, like young 
parents who need ideas on 
how to raise kids," said 
Simpson. 

There was no charge for 
businesses to come to the 
expo because Zorich wanted 
to give them a chance to 
come for free. 

"So many don't adver- 
tise to students because of 
expense and university limi- 
tations," he said. 



From reality to MySpace: many factors affect friendships 



Stephanie Siiapiro 
The Baltimore Sun 

Jessica Bowers does not 
suffer from a shortage of 
friends. 

"My predicament is that 
with the advent of MySpace, 
acquaintances can very 
quickly become friends," 
says Bowers, a media-rela- 
tions coordinator at Goucher 
College in Baltimore. "When 
you're working a 9-to-5 job, 
and then doing other, 
career- related stuff and per- 
sonal time for yourself, it 
almost becomes too many 
obligations." 

A recent Duke 

University study on the 
demise of friendship is an 
indication of "something 



that's not good for our socie- 
ty," said one of its authors, 
Lynn Smith-Lovin, a profes- 
sor of sociology, recently. 

But for those who don't 
fit into the scenario present- 
ed by the study-of a growing 
multitude of would-be 
friends cocooning instead in 
suburbia with their nuclear 
families-it may be all too 
easy to make friends. 

Within any given com- 
munity of common interest, 
be it a kayaking club, a 
Frisbee league or a team of 
Habitat for Humanity vol- 
unteers, opportunities for 
friendship abound. 

Alliances made in per- 
son are compounded by an 
ever-expanding matrix of 
cyber friends uploading love 
on Friendster, MySpace, 



Facebook and other online 
gathering places. Other 
electronic communication, 
including instant messaging 
and texting, also demand a 
steady supply of 24/7 com- 
panions. 

It can be a full-time job 
keeping up with all of those 
friends-from childhood, 
from school, from work, 
from the neighborhood- 
and, of course, there are all 
of those friends of friends. 

Just how many Best 
Friends Forever can any one 
person sustain? Friendship 
may be linked to longevity 
and good health by 
researchers, but is there a 
tipping point when nurtur- 
ing relationships becomes 
more of a burden than a joy? 

"As you get older, you're 



juggling so many different 
things, such as family with 
work," says Michael Papa, a 
professor of communication 
at Central Michigan 
University. "If you're still 
adding social connections, it 
can start to create problems 
in other areas of your life. 
Unfortunately, you do have 
to prioritize: What are the 
relationships that are most 
important in terms of your 
own needs and the needs of 
the other person?" 

The hours spent loung- 
ing on the Internet may con- 
tribute to a decrease in 
friends, the Duke study 
speculates. But as Bowers 
socializes at bars, concerts 
and clubs with MySpace 
contacts, her collection of 
real-life friends has over- 



Mary Walter Leadership Development Series 

Fall 2006 ' In the Gemmell Student Complex at 7-8 pm 

Sponsored by the Office of Campus Life 
Questions can be directed to Student Coordinator Ashley Walker at MWLeadership@clarion.edu 

Session 3: Wed. Oct. 18 



Session 1; Wed. Oct. 4 

"Missed Opportunities" 
Room 250-252 



Se ssion 4: Wed. Oct. 25 

"Getting Involved Within 

Your College Community" 

Room 250-252 



Session 2: Wed. Oct. 11 

'Abandon the Path and Leave a Trail" "Going the Extra Mile: 
Room 250-252 A Parable of Success" 

Room 146 



Session 5: Wed. Nov. 1 



Session 6: T^e. Nov. 7 



Choosing to Be Champions in Life" "Why Does It Matter NowT 
Room 250-252 Room 250-252 

Session 7: Wed. Nov. 15 

"Benefits of Being Involved" 
Room 250-252 



lapped and converged with a 
sprawling universe of virtu- 
al buddies. It has gotten to 
the point, she says, where "I 
don't have time to be collect- 
ing people I don't know." 

Rather than feel obliged 
to attend dozens of art open- 
ings and concerts showcas- 
ing her innumerable bud- 
dies, Bowers, 26, finally 
took her mother's advice 
and learned to decline invi- 
tations. 

Tracy Gosson has never 
felt the need for a wealth of 
friends. 

"I need like two really 
good confidants and that's 
it," says Gosson, executive 
director of the Live 
Baltimore Home Center, a 
nonprofit group that pro- 
motes city living. "It's too 
much work having 10 
friends." 

That Americans' inner 
circle of confidants has 
"shrunk dramatically," 
according to the Duke study, 
leaves Chicago author 
Joseph Epstein unmoved. 

"One of the great divi- 
sions of humankind is 
between those who get a 
great release from confes- 
sion and those who don't," 
says Epstein, whose new 
book, "Friendship: An 
Expose," casts a gimlet eye 
on friendship's complexities. 

"I have no confidants 
except my wife," he says. "I 
don't confide everything to 
her. Other things I cheerful- 
ly repress." 

No matter how many 
speed-dial buddies you can 
boast, there are natural lim- 



its as to the number of 
friends one can accumulate, 
says Robin Dunbar, an evo- 
lutionary psychologist at the 
University of Liverpool. He 
and collaborators have 
found that in a wide variety 
of cultures the degrees of 
intimacy expand outward in 
a similar pattern of concen- 
tric rings. 

A "support clique of best 
friends" numbers about five, 
while the "sympathy group" 
extends from 12 to 15 mem- 
bers, according to Dunbar's 
research. Beyond that, are 
the 30 to 50 folks who are 
"contacted at least once a 
month," and beyond them, 
the greater "social network" 
with a capacity of 150 mem- 
bers. 

It may be reassuring for 
those who feel guilty of 
friend neglect to know that 
time is an intractable factor 
in determining the quantity 
and quality of friendships. 

"We rather think that 
you have to invest a certain 
amount of time to get a rela- 
tionship up to a certain 
level," Dunbar says. "And 
that limits the number you 
can have at that level." 

Like the Duke 
researchers, Dunbar ques- 
tions technology's efficacy in 
forging friendships. "In my 
view, there is nothing to 
replace face-to-face con- 
tacts," he says. 

As one's friends multi- 
ply by the thousands in the 
digital universe, the very 
concept of friendship can be 
stretched to the breaking 
point. 



September 28, 2006 



Sodoku: A old game with a new twist 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s.sadesmondOclarion.edu 

Sudoku is one of the 
most popular games sweep- 
ing the world. The game, 
which has become an 
American favorite, has its 
beginnings in ancient 
Chinese legend. 

Long ago, the Chinese 
made offerings to the river 
god in attempts to appease 
him. When they were unsuc- 
cessful, a turtle came onto 
the shore. 

On the turtle's shell 
were markings that stood 
for the numbers one 
through nine. Each line had 
a sum of 15, indicating to 
the people that their offer 
was not sufficient 

(httpV/www.plus. maths.org) 

These lines became 
known as Magic Squares. In 
these squares, each row, col- 
umn and the two main diag- 
onals add up to 15. 

Sudoku's origin can be 
directly traced back to a 
mathematical exercise 

called Latin Squares. 
Discovered by Leonhard 
Euler, Latin Squares chal- 
lenge players to form a 
square of numbers. The 
catch is each column and 
row can only contain one of 
each number once. 

Here's an example of a 
4x4 Latin Square^ 



only once in each column or 
row. The numbers one uses 
to fill in the boxes directly 
corresponds to the amount 
of rows and columns (a nine- 
bynine square would use 
the numbers one through 
nine). 

In 1979, a new game 
emerged from the basic con- 
cept of Euler's squares. 
Number Place was intro- 
duced in Dell Magazines' 
May issue of Pencil Puzzles 
and Word Games. 



any small 9-b()x square..." 
(http7/www.maa.org). 

This puzzle highly 
resembled Euler's Latin 
Squares, except that the 
board is broken up into 
small three-bythree boxes 
that each must contain the 
numbers one through nine. 
This range of numbers is 
always used no matter how 
big the board is and certain 
numbers are given in prede- 
termined spots to challenge 
the player 




Page 7 



4 








1 


9 


5 




6 




7 








2 






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8 












3 




4 




2 




9 




1 


4 








6 


1 




3 




8 


5 








7 


6 




8 




1 




1 




4 












5 


2 






1 








3 




7 




3 


5 


9 








1 



Jenifer Poblete/The Clarion Call 

A Sudoku stumper - Try this sudoku puzzle! 



1 


2 


3 


4 


2 


3 


4 


1 


3 


4 


1 


2 


4 


1 


2 


3 



Each number from one 
through four in a fourby- 
four Latin Square is used 



The magazine presented 
it with the instructions, "In 
this puzzle, your job is to 
place a number into every 
empty box so that each row 
across, each column down, 
and each small nine-box 
square within the large 
square (there are nine of 
these) will contain each 
number from one through 
nine. Remember that no 
number may appear more 
than once in any row across, 
any column down, or within 



Number Place was soon 
published in a Japanese 
magazine called Monthly 
Nikolist. It was named 
Suuji Wa Dokushin Ni 
Kagiru, or "the numbers 
must be single," and later 
shortened to Sudoku 
(httpV/www.maa.org). 

The same concept 
stands today, in a number of 
different media. There are 
Sudoku books, online 
games, printings in maga- 
zines and newspapers, web 



sites and more. 

There have also been 
many variations of the basic 
game. 

Sudoku X instructs that 
players also must include 
the numbers one through 
nine in the two main diago- 
nals. 

Others use color-coding 
to challenge players. Some 
use two colors to distinguish 
which boxes must include 
an odd or even number. 
Multiple colors are some- 
times used to distinguish 
that a certain set of num- 
bers must be used in the cor- 
responding box (for exam- 
ple, the numbers one 
through four must be in a 
pink box). 

Some Sudoku problems 
become more complicated 
and take much more time to 
solve. These include differ- 
ent shaped areas instead of 
the normal boxes, specially 
marked lines in which the 
two numbers touching the 
line must be consecutive 
and even ones that use 
dominoes. 

Many Web sites also 
offer different versions that 
utilize computer technology. 
Some drop numbers into the 
board and others can offer 
hints or different levels of 
difficulty. 

Although Sudoku in its 
simplest form may seem to 
be just as difficult and 
mathematical as the more 
advanced versions, there is 
no math involved. It is 
merely a game of skill, prac- 
tice and problem -solving. 



These campus clubs shouldn't go unnoticed 



Danielle Butcherine 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_dnbutcheri@clarion.edu 

Now that the fall semes- 
ter is in full swing, many 
students are looking for 
soniething to do other than 
sitting in their rooms study- 
ing, watching TV, or playing 
on the computer. Although 
there are a few well known 
organizations around cam- 
pus, not all students are 
aware that Clarion 
University has a wide array 
of activities that are avail- 
able to participate in. With 
over 70 recognized student 
organizations, there is 
something for everyone at 
Clarion University. 

For students interested 
in anthropology, Clarion is 
home to an Anthropology 
Club, headed by Dr. Laurie 
Occhipinti and Dr. Susan 
Prezzano. According to 
Occhipinti, the 

Anthropology Club has 
existed at Clarion for a very 
long time, but was revital- 
ized in 2003 with new 
organization and student 
leadership after being 
placed in suspension around 
2002. 

The Anthropology Club 
holds bi-weekly meetings 
along with various other 
activities. 

"Regular meetings this 
year are held every other 
Wednesday at 11 a.m. in 105 



Founders," said Occhipinti. 
"This year we are hosting a 
film series every other 
Wednesday at 6 p.m. in 105 
Founders where we are 
screening feature films 
related to anthropology. We 
also host visiting speakers, 
work on service projects, col- 
laborate on research, go to 
conferences and have both 
local and overnight trips." 

Members of the 
Anthropology Club get to do 
more than stay around 
Clarion and attend weekly 
meetings. 

"Last year, members of 
the Anthropology Club trav- 
eled to the American 
Anthropological Association 
annual conference and 
meeting in Washington 
D.C.," said Occhipinti. 
"Students attended a lot of 
panel to see what scholars 
in the field are working on, 
saw the conference and also 
visited the National Zoo and 
the National American 
Indian Museum." 

The Anthropology Club 
has some activities and field 
trips in the works already 
for this semester 

"This year we are plan- 
ning several trips. We are 
going to Pittsburgh in the 
fall to visit the zoo and pos- 
sibly museums. We are also 
looking ahead to attend a 
professional conference in 
the spring," said Occhipinti. 

Women United, advised 
by Dr Deb Burghardt, is 
another organization for 



students to get involved 
with at Clarion. 

"Women United is an 
organization that was 
founded by African 
American women who want- 
ed to unite diverse students 
at Clarion," said Burghardt. 
"They wanted to bring 
together different races and 
genders to talk about the 
campus and the community. 
They hoped to be a group to 
encourage and support aca- 
demics." 

Women United meet- 
ings are held every 
Thursday at 7 p.m. in the 
Women's Studies Center in 
207 Harvey Hall. The organ- 
ization participates in 
numerous activities 

throughout the year. 

"Women United kind of 
adopted the Stop Abuse For 
Everyone (SAFE) agency," 
said Burghardt. "We organ- 
ize the Flame to Fire vigil 
every October and encour- 
age people to give donations 
to SAFE. We also support 
Take Back the Night, which 
happens every spring. We 
are also co-sponsors of V- 
Day and the Vagina 
Monologues, held near 
Valentine's Day." 

The organization also 
plans to attend activities 
outside of the Clarion com- 
munity. 

"This year, we are trying 
to send people to the 
Pennsylvania Black 

Conference of Higher 
Education to learn about 



leadership," said Burghardt, 

Yet another organiza- 
tion students can look into 
at Clarion is the Newman 
Association. 

"The Newman 

Association is a recognized 
student organization that is 
composed of Catholic stu- 
dents, but it is not exclu- 
sive," said Shawn Hoke, one 
of the faculty advisors of the 
organization. "Anyone can 
join." 

The Newman 

Association holds meetings 
every Thursday evening 
between 6 and 7 p.m. at the 
Clarion Campus Ministry 
house, located at 60 
Greenville Ave., across from 
Tippin Gym. The organiza- 
tion also holds campus Mass 
every Sunday at 5 p.m. in 
the Gemmell Student 
Complex. Aside from hold- 
ing weekly meetings and 
church services, the organi- 
zation participates in many 
different activities around 
campus. 

"We sponsor a speaker 
series and have a number of 
different people give presen- 
tations," said Hoke. "We 
have theological discussion 
and debates, express our 
faith through charity, and 
foster inter-faith relations. 
We also have different 
fundraisers and social func- 
tions for people to come see 
what the organization is 
about." 



Campus Ctom up 



Know anyone who is an 
outstanding student? 

Nonninate them for the Campus Close-up! 

Send their name and why they deserve it to 

s_sadesmond@clarion.edu 



ASKWCrOHlAC/H'E 



Dear Dr. Eagle. 

What is the difference between a cold and aUergiea? 

Signed, 

Congested 

Dear Congested, 

Then are several diffewnces between a a^d and 
allergies' 

m Srmedng many times 
in a row is ugually a sign of 
an allergy rather than a cold. 

m Itchy eyes wcur often 
with allergies, but rarely 
with colds. 

m Nasal discharge is usu- 
tdly thin, watery and clear 
with an allergy. Nasal dis- 
cbarge with a cold ia 
thick, cloudy and even yellow 
in color. 

m Aches and pains are 
associated with colds, but 
rately with allergies. 

m Headaches and dizzi- 
ness are common with colds, 
hut not with allergies. 

m A cold usually involves a cough. 

m Allergies often occur at a certain time of the year. 

m Colds get worse over several days, while allergies 
occur after exposure to allergen. 

m Colds last three to five days, and allergies last as 
long as you are exposed to allergen. 




Dr. Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson of the Keeling 
Health Center. For more information or to suggest a 
topic, e-mail her at s^smwilsoniSclarion.edu. 



The freshman freakout: the 
millenial generation is unpre- 
pared for college life 



Kathleen Megan 
The Hartford Courant 

Laura Sample wouldn't 
call it homesickness exactly, 
more like a difficult transi- 
tion. 

She never had trouble 
being away from home in 
the past, but somehow this 
fall, her freshman year at 
the University of 

Connecticut, was more of a 
challenge than she expect- 
ed. 

Coming from Danvers, 
Mass., a town with shops 
nearby her home, she found 
it difficult to adjust to being 
out in the country, seeming- 
ly so far from everything. 

"I almost felt kind of 
trapped," Laura said. 
"Almost like claustrophobic 
- not what I had grown up 
with." 

She's made lots of phone 
calls home, and her mother 
has visited frequently. "I 
was so upset; I was a mess,"' 
said Laura. She remembers 
thinking, "How is this ever 
going to work out?" Her 
mother suggested she might 
want a backup plan; she 
might want to think about 
transferring. 

It happens all across the 
U.S.: the freshman freakout. 
They arrive on 

campus-often at their 
dream school-and they are 
faced with so many 
unknowns and differences 
that they begin to question 
why they wanted to go to 
college. 

Colin Riley, Boston 
University spokesman, says 
it's not unlike the kind of 
"buyer's regret" that can 
envelop a consumer who 
purchases an expensive car 
It can be a kind of knee-jerk 
response to what Riley says 
"is the biggest transition of 
a person's life in a compre- 
hensive way." 

"Virtually everything is 
new: the entire surround- 
ings, the people they associ- 
ate with. The things they do 
and say on a typical day are 
just different," Riley said. 



Riley can tell parents 
which day to expect that 
"I'm overwhelmed" phone 
call. It's usually about 15 
days after they arrive. 
That's because, he says, 
most have been away from 
home for a week or two, and 
they are "just sort of expect- 
ing to be returning home." 

Other key times parents 
can expect to hear from for- 
lorn kids is at midterms 
-when kids often find out 
they have to work harder— 
and after Thanksgiving 
break. 

Is this sort of meltdown 
happening more often with 
this generation? And how 
should parents respond? 

Randolph Lee, a psy- 
chologist and director of the 
counseling center at Trinity 
College, doesn't think he's 
seeing more homesickness 
than he did a decade or two 
ago, but "I think you do see 
more of a knee-jerk reaction: 
Parents tend to get more 
alarmist about it more 
quickly than they used to. 

"We see so many more 
calls from parents." 

If left alone, Lee said, 
kids usually find friends 
and feel much more at home 
by about mid-October 

Experts say it's normal 
to miss your home, your 
friends, your own bed, not 
having to share a room and 
home cooking. But there is 
some anecdotal evidence 
that this generation may be 
having a tougher time mak- 
ing that transition. 

This is what you've 
probably been hearing 
about for a few years now: 
the millennial generation 
with their helicopter par- 
ents who swoop into the res- 
cue. 

As a result, college-age 
kids often "have no experi- 
ence with how to sit with 
bad feelings," Wyatt said. 
'Their coping skills and tol- 
erance for frustration are 
lower than in the past." 

The good news is, 
experte say, that most fresh- 
man relax into college life 
sometime during that first 
semester. 



Pages 



TM CLARION CALL 



September 28. 2006 



Meitiiueit 



Lack of entertainment in Clarion 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_sedentOclarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 28 - I'm 
not sure if anyone else 
noticed this except me and a 
few other of my friends, but 
there was absolutely noth- 
ing going on in Clarion in 
the last week. 

After Fall CampusFest 
'06 and the Recycled 
Percussion performance, it 
seems that we are undergo- 
ing a dryspell of entertain- 
ment. Besides the UAB 
weekend movie, this week 
they are featuring 
"Superman Returns," there 
is absolutely nothing going 
on in Clarion. 

Why are we going 
through this dryspell? And 
what exactly is it causing 
students to resort to? 

In most cases, it is not 
neccesarily studying that 
occurs when students have 
nothing to do, it is television 
that consumes their lives. 



In the last week, numer- 
ous television shows have 
had their season premieres, 
including "Grey's Anatomy," 
"Desperate Housewives," 
"Gilmore Girls," "Heroes" 
and many more television 
favorites and new series. 

I personally can say that 
my Thursday night com- 
pletely revolved around 9 
p.m., for those of you who 
don't know why that is sig- 
nificant, "Grey's Anatomy" 
premiered on Thursday. My 
friends and I actually made 
plans to cook a snack and 
get together specifically for 
the premiere. 

Can I please just say, for 
my own sake, that Meredith 
should definitely pick 
McDreamy over Finn? Come 
on now, we all know she's in 
love with him, but she's 
scared of him ripping her 
heart out again. Although I 
do give Addison props for 
being one gorgeous redhead. 

Sunday, although I did 
not make any plans, I sat on 



my bed with my books in 
hand, watching my favorite 
night-time soap 

opera/drama (oh come on, 
you know that's what it is!) 
characters on "Desperate 
Housewives." 

Of course, although it's 
not new, my Sunday nights 
at 10 p.m. are devoted to 
Flava Flav. I must say, I love 
to engulf myself in the 
ridiculously violent drama 
that the women on "Flava of 
Love" cause over Flav. Let's 
be serious here ladies, he's 
ugly and most people only 
want him because he's 
loaded. Also, we all know he 
sent Bootz home because 
she wants to remain celibate 
until marriage. 

Even our next day con- 
versations involve the tele- 
vision shows we watched 
the previous evening. This 
is something that I do not 
think will go away in time. 
My mother and her co-work- 
ers discuss eveiy morning in 
the office their favorite tele- 



vision shows and what hap- 
pened on them, and it's an 
unwritten rule that if you 
didn't watch the show, don't 
even come to the office 
because it will be ruined for 
you. 

I don't know if may be 
we are supposed to be men- 
tally preparing ourselves for 
Autumn Leaf Festival, bet- 
ter known as A.L.F. to most. 
For those students who 
have yet to experience 
A.L.F. it is a week where 
Clarion turns completely 
upside down and the 
unimaginable happens^ 
Clarion becomes FUN! 

Should we be preparing 
ourselves for Poor Man's 
Caramel Apples, funnel 
cakes and strombolis? 
Maybe those sweet bread 
bowls with pasta in them? 
I'm not quite sure. I know 
that most are just excited 
that A.L.F. allows us to have 
next Friday's classes can- 
celled (At least I know I 
am!). It also gives us an 



excuse to let go completely 
for a weekend. 

I mean, of course, fun in 
Clarion dies out again after 
A.L.F. Back to the usual, 
everyone, including myself, 
goes home on the weekends 
and the people who live too 
far away to go home or are 
choosing the life of inde- 
pendence away from their 
families have to find their 
own ways to entertain them- 
selves. 

There is always the fun 
late-night trips to Wal-Mart 
to find stupid stuff Also, we 
are able to get $3 tickets to 
Destinta Theatres, which 
being a movie junkie myself, 
I definitely take advantage 
of Besides that, what else is 
there to do in Clarion except 
go to dinner, go to parties or 
stay in and watch television 
and movies? Absolutely 
nothing. If someone knows 
of something else, please, let 
me know! 



"Jackass 2" 
is better 
than original 

Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_sedent@clafion.edu 

CLARION Sept. 28 - My 
Tuesday night consisted of 
my boyfriend and I fighting, 
as usual, over what movie to 
go see. We narrowed it down 
between "Jackass" and 
"Hollywoodland." I'll tell you 
this. I was not disappointed 
with the decision. 

"Jackass Number Two" 
was probably one of the fun- 
niest movies that I have 
seen in a long time. The 
movie starred old time 
favorites Johnny Knoxville, 
Bam Margera, Ryan Dunn, 
Raab Himself, Dave 
England and many more. 

See "Jackass" on pg. 9 



''Saturday Night Live" updates weelcend 



Scott Collins 
Los Angeles Times 

HOLLYWOOD - It is not 
accidental that last season's 
most popular bit on 
"Saturday Night Live" was 
not anything uttered by the 
co-anchors of the fake-news 
segment "Weekend Update," 
Amy Poehler and Tina Fey, 
nor indeed anything per- 
formed live in NBC's Studio 
8H. It was an off-the-wall 
taped piece, the rap parody 
"Lazy Sunday," which 
became a hit on Internet 
video-sharing sites. 

For at least the last cou- 
ple of seasons, the theme 
music for "Weekend Update" 
has been the signal to climb 
out of bed and finish flossing 
your teeth. You wouldn't 
want to miss the musical act 
- not to mention a skit that 
might actually be funny - so 
"Update" has offered a per- 
fect interlude to get some- 
thing else done. 

For those who do stick 
around, "Update" still offers 
a nice, tart punch line or 
two and sometimes an 
amusing bit by a mock com- 
mentator or a surprise guest 
(Drew Barrymore, for exam- 
ple, did a walk-on in 



January to object to a joke 
about her breasts). But who 
buzzes on Monday morning 
about "Update" the way 
many people do the rest of 
the workweek about 
Comedy Central's frequent- 
ly brilliant and incisive "The 
Daily Show With Jon 
Stewart?" 

Last week, "SNL" execu- 
tive producer Lome 
Michaels confirmed 

Rockefeller Center's worst- 
kept secret' that head writer 
Seth Meyers would join 
Poeiiier on "Update" when a 
downsized "SNL" returns 
for its 32nd season on NBC 
on Saturday. 

So it's worth asking 
what the role of "Update" 
should be in a world where 
the news is updated with 
every click of a browser's 
refresh button, and Stewart 
has thoroughly lampooned 
many of those headlines 
long before the weekend. 
Just like real newscasts, 
"Update" depends hugely on 
its anchors, which is why 
the heat is now on Meyers to 
improve the segment. 

In fairness, "Update" 
virtually invented the fake- 
news format that Stewart 
and his compatriot Stephen 
Colbert are so brilliantly 
exploiting. Unlike "The 



Daily Show," "Update" is not 
self-contained; it remains 
part of a larger comedy-vari- 
ety show and runs only 
about 10 minutes. One also 
hesitates to complain about 
"Update" because ... well, 
everyone does, just as critics 
carp about the inconsistent 
quality of "SNL' overall. An 
army of reviewers, late- 
night junkies and assorted 
haters have piled on ever 
since Chevy Chase intro- 
duced "Update" during the 
Oct. 11, 1975, premiere of 
"SNL" (the debut segment 
opened with Chase mur- 
muring into his desk phone, 
"What are you wearing right 
now? No bathrobe?," then 
glimpsing the camera and 
promptly hanging up). 

Whenever a new anchor 
takes the "Update" seat - 
and the list now numbers 
some 31 names, most 
notably Chase, Bill Murray, 
Dennis Miller, Norm 
MacDonald and the now- 
departed Fey ■■ a legion of 
fans inevitably compares 
him or her unfavorably with 
a predecessor and declares 
the format obsolete. Former 
Los Angeles Times TV critic 
Howard Rosenberg thought 
"Weekend Update" should 
have been put out of its mis- 
ery long ago: "It has always 



tilted toward the infantile, 
and now there's the added 
problem of old age and a 
faint pulse." 

Not too faint, evidently 
Rosenberg wrote those 
words in 1980, when Jimmy 
Carter was in the White 
House and Charles Rocket 
was at the anchor desk. 
Since then, "Saturday Night 
Live" has done more than 
500 fake-news segments. 
For better or worse, 
"Update" has become 
"SNL's" signature. 

Since 2000, the bit has 
relied on two anchors, which 
has proved to be a mistake. 
Fey, who left to make the 
comedy "30 Rock" for NBC, 
has an acidic wit but always 
seemed boxed in by Poehler, 
a talented sketch artist 
who's out of her element as 
a fake newscaster, and Fey's 
former co-anchor, Jimmy 
Fallon. The most successful 
"Update" anchors have 
either embraced Chase and 
writer Herb Sargent's initial 
blueprint for absurdity 
(Chase informed viewers 
that "Generalissimo 

Francisco Franco is still 
dead") or turned a merciless 
eye on celebrity foibles (the 
deadpan MacDonald, 

reportedly Chase's personal 
favorite among his many 



successors, informed view- 
ers with barely contained 
glee that Michael Jackson is 
"a homosexual pedophile"). 

But in today's super- 
heated poUtical environ- 
ment, "Update" can often 
come off as a "Daily Show" 
for people with lower SAT 
scores. Take the mock edito- 
rial last October from 
Horatio Sanz, who argued 
that President Bush is a 
genius because he follows 
each miscue with a bigger 
one that distracts from the 
initial mistake. "I tried this 
Bush technique this past 
week, and it was very use- 
ful," Sanz told viewers. "On 
Wednesday I showed up two 
hours late for rehearsal, so 
to distract people from that, 
I was also drunk." 

It was an amusing 
enough punch line, but not 
the sort of thing that would 
make Jon Stewart look over 
his shoulder. "The Daily 
Show" has made bold use of 
archival video that sharply 
questions the assumptions 
that led to the Iraq war ■■ 
and that, topped with 
Stewart's editorial asides, is 
often hilarious to boot. 

But then, "Update" has 
survived six presidential 
administrations and all 
signs point to it outlasting 



the current one too. 

Legendary manager 
Bernie Brillstein, who han- 
dled John Belushi and other 
young comics from the early 
"SNL," applauds his old 
friend Michaels for keeping 
"SNL" and "Update" going 
through endless cast 
changes. He admitted that 
having to replace the 
anchors every few years 
makes it hard for viewers to 
know what to expect from 
"Update." But he suggested 
that a comparison between 
"The Daily Show" and 
"Saturday Night Live" isn't 
exactly fair, because "SNL" 
is aiming for, and attracting, 
a much broader audience. 

"The show has stayed 
true to its original begin- 
nings," Brillstein said of 
"SNL." "To keep doing that 
for (31) years is amazing." 

As for "Update" itself, he 
added, "I don't see any rea- 
son it shouldn't be on 'SNL.' 
Lome's only concept in 
starting 'SNL' was, 'I'm 
going to do a television show 
for people who were brought 
up on TV.' Even today, I 
think the news remains part 
of that." 



''Tile Covenant" disappoints tiieatregoers 



Adrienne Cain 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_acain@clarion.edu 

CLARION Sept. 28 - While 
this review is coming a bit 
late ("The Covenant" came 
out on September 8 and I 
saw it on September 9), I 
was called in to do my civic 
duty and review the film 
and I answered the call 
most eagerly. 

Everyone should know 
just what they are getting 
into before seeing this par- 
ticular cinematic adventure. 

The film tells the story 
of the descendants of power- 
ful and magical families in 
the town of Ipswich, Mass. 
Five families formed a 
covenant of silence years 
ago. However, one of the 
families was betrayed and 
wiped out. Of course, the 
fifth family was not com- 
pletely wiped out and now 
the descendant of that line 



is out for revenge. 

Actually, when written 
as I just wrote it, the plot 
sounds somewhat promis- 
ing. You might mistakenly 
imagine that the film is 
going to be an action 
packed, exciting tale of 
revenge. Unfortunately, the 
film takes close to forty-five 
or fifty minutes to build up 
to any kind of real action 
while the whole first part is 
muddled in pace and full of 
random and usually point- 
less computer graphic 
witchery. There is a lot of 
random witchcraft, which is 
just that... random. 

The families work based 
on the premise that their 
powers are passed down 
each generation to the eld- 
est son, which makes all the 
witches in this film male, 
and is the only deviation 
from 'normal' witch films 
that the movie employs. 

On the thirteenth birth- 
day of the eldest male, he 



receives a "sample" of the 
power he will achieve at 18 
when he "ascends" and 
gains full powers. 

As far as the movie 
shows, the witches in train- 
ing spend their pre-powers 
almost entirely on evading 
the cops, lifting a woman's 
skirt, cheating at pool, 
jumping off of cliffs to make 
it to a party and lazily levi- 
tating nearby books to their 
hands. 

The power they have as 
youths is small compared to 
their adult powers but have 
the bonus of not being tied 
into their life force. 

Once they "ascend," 
their power becomes their 
life force and the more they 
use, the more their body 
weakens and ages. 

We, and they, are 
reminded of the fact that 
these powers are seductive 
about 300 times during the 
film. Or maybe it was a 
dozen times. I lost track, but 



sufficed it to say, the cre- 
ators were very adamant 
that everyone understands 
that powers are very dan- 
gerous and are to be used 
wisely. 

It's not hard to see where 
the movie went. The lost 
descendant of the fifth fami- 
ly comes back for revenge, 
choosing to single out the 
lead character Caleb 
Danvers (Steven Strait) who 
is closest to ascending. 

After some spells, an 
accident or two, and the kid- 
napping of Caleb's love 
interest, the film culminates 
in a magic battle of 
mediocre proportions. 

Does the hero win? I'll 
leave that up to your imagi- 
nation, but I don't recom- 
mend using too much, the 
creators sure didn't and you 
might throw the curve. All 
I'll say is that a sequel is not 
impossible. 

1 was extremely eager to 
see 'The Covenant" when it 



came out after seeing the 
trailers because I could tell 
it was going to be terrible. I 
have to say I was not disap- 
pointed. 

If you go into "The 
Covenant" expecting any- 
thing more than a mediocre 
and predictable plot, unin- 
spired acting, and a com- 
plete lack of anything 
resembling suspense or hor- 
ror, you are going to be sadly 
disappointed. 

However, if you go into 
"The Covenant" expecting to 
mock it mercilessly, then 
you will find fertile ground 
there indeed. 

I went with four other 
people to see "The 
Covenant" all of whom 
enjoyed mocking the film 
with enthusiasm. 

One spent the film ana- 
lyzing the clones that were 
three of the lead characters, 
one spent it pointing out the 
homosexual overtones (real 
and imagined) between the 



witches, one declared 
adamantly that Caleb had a 
severe Oedipus complex and 
was actively trying to 
remodel his love interest in 
the image of his mother, and 
one friend spent it amazed 
by the poor dialogue and the 
strange way it portrayed 
private school as nearly 
identical to college. 

I can boil this film down in 
regards to its three cinemat- 
ic classifications: 

Action: Computer graphic 
imaging Witchcraft and a lot 
of people slamming into 
walls. 

Horror: One character 
uses a public shower with- 
out her own toiletries or 
shower sandals. 

Thriller: Heavy metal 
music is the most heart 
pounding part of the film. 

Overall, I give the film a 
two out of five. Sadly, I've 
seen worse and you can't say 
that 'The Covenant" didn't 
try. 



September 28, 2006 



Tiffi CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



''Letters" brought a tear to my eye 




Emily Aaron 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_emaaronOclarlon.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 28 - Every 
summer I read many books 
to help pass the time, but 
this summer I read one that 
will stick with me for the 
rest of my life. James 
Patterson wrote an amazing 
story about a girl fighting to 
live her life without the man 
she loved. "Samis Letters to 
Jennifer" was the name of 
this book. 

After losing her hus- 
band, Jennifer did not know 
how she could handle her 
life anymore. All she did 
was work day in and day out 
to pass the time. Her 
friends said that she was 
"married to her job," "a bas- 
ket case," "a hopeless 
workaholic," "the new spin- 
ster" and "romantically 
challenged." These were just 
a few of the things they said. 

She was so sad and 
depressed that she thought 
it was impossible to breathe 
without her beloved Danny. 
There was nothing she could 
do to get over her loss other 
than by writing for the 
Tribune which seemed to 



control her life. When she 
did not think her life could 
get any worse, she received 
a phone call from an old 
friend, John Farley, saying 
that her grandmother, Sam, 
was in the hospital and not 
doing too well. 

Her grandmother had 
taken a pretty bad fall and 
was in a coma. She knew 
what she had to do. That 
was to go back to her 
favorite spot as a child: 
Lake Geneva. 

Jennifer was very close 
with her grandmother and 
she was the only person she 
really cared to keep in con- 
tact with. Once she reached 
the hospital and saw her 
grandmother, she knew she 
was not going to be leaving 
the lake anytime soon. 

After talking to the doc- 
tors in ICU about Sam. she 
drove back to her grand- 
mothers' house on the lake, 
thinking she could get a 
good nights sleep and visit 
her grandmother in the 
morning. Only to find a let- 
ter addressed to her. She 
knew the famihar handwrit- 
ing; It was her grandmoth- 
ers. 

In these letters her 
grandmother goes on to tell 



her all about her life and 
Jennifer's grandfather, 
Charlie. She tells Jennifer 
that she never really loved 
Charlie and had a secret 
lover. Sam would not reveal 
this man to Jennifer in any 
of the letters. Jennifer was 
only allowed to read one let- 
ter per day. Sam did not 
want her to get too far 
ahead. After reading the 
first letter Jennifer wanted 
her grandmother to wake up 
and tell her everything. 

As the weeks passed 
and Jennifer read the let- 
ters she wanted to talk to 
her grandmother more and 
more. She wanted to under- 
stand the Hfe her grand- 
mother lived, but she could 
not without speaking to her. 
She was beginning to get 
over the loss of her husband 
because she knew that she 
had to with all that was 
happening with her grand- 
mother. 

Suddenly, a man came 
into her life and it hit her 
hard. She started to fall in 
love with him. Brendan was 
an amazing person, but he 
had some very bad secrets 
that he was keeping from 
her. Everyday the two of 
them would go and visit her 



grandmother and go on 
some sort of ama/mg date. 
Life was starting to look bet- 
ter for Jennifer when sud- 
denly something else hap- 
pened... 

Now I know that you are 
probably wondering what 
happened next. Well I'm not 
going to tell you. You'll have 
to read the book to find out. 
And trust me when I say 
that you will not be disap- 
pointed after reading this 
book. I read it in about a 
day and a half and cried at 
the least ten times. 

In my opinion, there 
was absolutely nothing 1 
would like to change about 
"Sam's Letters to Jennifer. " 
The book was amazing and 1 
would suggest it to every- 
one. I couldn't even narrow 
it down to one favorite part 
because I loved everything 
about the book. 

This was the best book 1 
have ever read and I would 
give it five stars. So next 
time you read a book go 
check out "Sam's Letters to 
Jennifer." If you enjoy love 
stories, then you will adore 
this book. 



Hearing those words, it sounds so sweet... 



Robyn Gray 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rlgray0clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 28 - We 
have all heard the latest hit 
"Lips of An Angel" by Hinder 
on the Top 40 radio lately. 
Some love it, some swear it 
was a song written about 
their life and current rela- 
tionship situation, some 
can't get it out of their head, 
and some just plain hate it. 
Nevertheless, this past 
week, I had the privilege to 
sit down and listen to 
Minder's new CD entitled 
"Extreme Behavior." 

Being a big Nickelback 
fan, I was told by the man at 
the record store that I would 
love this band. He was noth- 
ing short of correct. This is 
Binder's first major label 
CD and they are already 
reaping large profits off of it. 
People like me will love the 
sound similar to Nickelback. 
The band was inspired by 
Steven Tyler of Aerosmith, 
Bad Company, The Rolling 
Stones and Buckcherry. 

Lead singer Austin 
Winkler explains on the 
band's official website that, 
he'd "just like to bring back 
the good old decadent days 
when sex, drugs and rock & 
roll weren't dirty words, but^ 
a way of life." I think this 
may be one of the reasons 
why the band's music is so 
popular with high school, 
college students and young 
adults; they can relate to the 



songs. 

Hinder has songs on 
their album about love, 
cheating and about partying 
and living it up. Hinder gen- 
erally just has good rock 
songs. 

"Extreme Behavior" is 
filled with flick-yourBic 
moments of arena-rock 
splendor, dual lead guitars, 
four-part harmonies and 
beat-yourchest rock vocals. 

The first song off the 
album, "Get Stoned," really 
isn't the party anthem some 
would think. Its heavy rock 
style could help you get out 
of a bad mood after listening 
to it. 

Believe it or not, the 
rock band does actually 
have an emotional side. 
They show this side through 
their tracks "Homecoming 
Queen" and "Bhss (I Don't 
Wanna Know)." 

"Homecoming Queen" is 
actually a sad story about a 
girl who had it all, then fell 
for the totally wrong guy 
who left her with nothing. 
"Bliss" is another song many 
could relate to. It's a track 
about a couple who just 
can't bear to finally call it 
quits, and the stress and 
pain it causes in their lives. 

"Better Than Me" starts 
out with crisp sounding 
acoustics and really shows 
the great voice lead singer 
Winkler possesses. Many 
could relate to this song 
because it was written after 
a band member's bad break- 
up and it is relating to how 




hard it is to lose not only a 
lover, but a best friend. 

"Nothing Good About 
Goodbye" emphasizes that 
there are 'two stories to 
every he-said she said fight' 
through its Bon Jovi-like 
sound. 

"How Long" is sure to 
get one fired up with its 
hard hitting drums and 
screaming guitars from the 
first second. If there is one 
song that truly and fully 
sounds like Nickelback, I 
would have to say this is it. 

Of course I can't forget 
"Lips of An Angel." This 
song has been a smash hit 
ever since it was released. 
People love the variation of 
vocals and rock throughout 
the song and the lyrics in 
general. It is currently on 
the Top Ten charts and con- 
tinues to gain the band more 



''Slingo" addiction is serious 



Dominic Giallombardo 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_djgiallomb9clarJon.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 28 - Some 
games on the Internet were 
never meant to be played. 
Some games were meant to 
attract hundreds of gamers. 
This game was pretty much 
meant to take over your 
entire life. 

I have decided that 
"Slingo" is probably the 
most addictive game that 
one can find on the Internet. 
Sophomore, undecided 
major Carrie Vatter said. 
This game is more addict- 
ing than cigarettes." 

The premise of this 
game is so simple! it 
requires absolutely no 
thought. ..something I 

require of any game I play. 



Those of you who know 
me can vouch for this; 1 suck 
at video games, board 
games and pretty much all 
sports. I guess you could say 
that 1 have absolutely no 
talent whatsoever. This is 
true for most games! but 
"Slingo," isn't one of them. 

The goal of this game is 
to match the numbers on 
the bottom of the screen to 
the numbers on your card. 
It's basically a mixture 
between bingo and slots 
(Hence the name Slingo). 

While rolling, you can 
get other things besides 
numbers as well. For exam- 
ple, one could roll a devil, a 
joker, an angel or a coin. The 
devil takes your money, an 
angel saves you from the 
devil, the joker is a free card 
and coins give you points 
and gives extra points for 



getting a line of numbers 
filled. 

So now, I guess that you 
are so filled with enthusi- 
asm to play Slingo that you 
may quite possibly be jump- 
ing up and down. Or even 
better, side to side. But alas, 
I tell you there is more to 
this site than the amazing 
game that it was named 
after. 

There are several other 
games, none of which I like 
enough to even to write 
their names. So now 1 guess 
you can go to 

www.slingo.com and play. 

And while you are play- 
ing, and becoming an addict 
just remember this. I got 
you hooked... does that 
make me a bad person? 



popularity. 

Lastly, "By the Way" and 
"Room" are two other tracks 
on the CD. They weren't 
exactly anything I loved. 

Overall, I would give 
this short, ten-track CD a 
four out of five. I was a little 
upset that there were only 
10 tracks and that I didn't 
love every single one due to 
some unoriginality. Yet, the 
rock sound is great for work- 
ing out, getting yourself out 
of a dumpy mood, or just to 
listen to while hanging out 
with friends. 

For those who enjoy 
good rock and a little rebel- 
Uon in their lives and don't 
mind a little profanity, this 
is definitely a CD to pick up 
in the near future. 



"Jackass" continued 
from page 9. 

Personally I cannot fig- 
ure out why it is so funny 
when people fall or why it is 
absolutely hysterical when 
someone gets smacked in 
the face or hurt in any sort 
of way. 

Knoxville and crew defi- 
nitely out did themselves in 
this movie by coming up 
with ideas that were both 
disturbing but comical. 

The movie opens with 
everyone being chased down 
by bulls, picture the running 
of the bulls but less gore and 
funnier. 

The bulls played major 
roles in this film. In one 
skit, Knoxville blindfolded 
himself in the rain, lit a cig- 
arette and stood there shak- 
ing, then three seconds later 
a bull slammed him in the 
legs and he did a complete 



UAB movie of the weeit 

This wetk the IJnivt-rsity Activites Board movie of 
the week w "Superman Returns." It will be shown 
Thursday Sept. 28 in the Gemmell MPR at 8 p.m., Friday 
Sept. 29 in the MPR at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 8 p.m. in 
the Food court. 

"Superman Returns," which is rated PG13, stare 
Brandon Routh, Kate Bosworth, Kevin Spacey and 
Jame.'^ Marsden. Clark Kent, aka Superman. (Routh) 
returns after having gone missing for a long period of 
time. He realized that he misses Lois Lane (Bofiworth), 
who has gotten married and had a son with a man named 
Richard White (Marsden). All the while. Lex Luthor is 
plotting an evil plan involving crystals and taking over 
the USA. 

- Sarah Dent 



Ollvia-Newtoii John Judges ''Idor 

Olivia Newton-John spent Tuesday Sept. 26, her 58th 
birthday nonetheless, being a guest judge on Fox's 
American Idol, joining judges Simon Cowell, Randy 
Jackson and Paula Abdul, as well as host Ryan Seacrest, 

Newton-John has starred in "Grease" with John 
Travolta and has had hits like "I Honestly Love You," 

Newton- John knows what it's like to compete, having 
actually appeared on the TV show "Sing Sing Sing," 
where she won a trip to her homeland. England, to pur- 
sue a music career. She does not enjoy having to reject 
someone for wanting to sing. 

The new season of "American Idol" is scheduled to 
premiere in January. 



~ Sarah Dent 



Hanks is most trusted star 

Forbes magazine named Tom Hanks their "Most 
Trusted Celebrity" out of a list of 1,500 movie and TV 
stars. 

Coming in second is Rachel Ray, who hosts a cooking 
show on Food Network and whose show is produced by 
Oprah Winfrey's company, who came in fourth. 

In third place is Michael J. Fox, who suffers from 
Parkinson's Disease. 

In fifth place came James Earl Jones. 



- Sarah Dent 

ABC makes a comeback 

ABC came in first for the first week of the new sea- 
son among adults 18- 49. ABC, who has been struggUng 
for years, has "Grey's Anatomy," which is on Thursdays 
at 9 p.m., to thank. 

"Grey's Anatomy" beat out CBS's "CSI: Crime Scene 
Investigatons," which has dominated Thursday nights 
for years. 

KBC came in second for the week, improving 12 per 
cent since last season's fiirst week, 

- Sarah Dent 

Oprah goes to radio 

Oprah Winfrey, a talk show host on ABC, launched 
her own channel on the radio. Oprah and Friends is on 
Monday morning's on XM Satellite Radio. 

The show features Winfrey and numerous of person- 
alities that appear on her television show such as Gayle 
King, her best friend, and poet Maya Angelou. 

The station will bi-oadcast 24 hours a day and 
includes programming such as "The Oprah and Gayle 
Show." 

Winfrey signed a three-year, $55 million deal with 
XM for the channel. 

- Sarah Dent 



front flip over top of the bull. 

Later in the movie, a 
enormous see-saw type 
machine was built in the 
midst of a bull pen. The see- 
saw split into four seats, 
forming two teams. One 
team consisted of Knoxville 
and Chris Pontius and the 
other of Margera and Dunn. 

I think that the ideas in 
this movie were completely 
off the wall. 1 was worried 
that it would almost be a 
repeat, the same old 
"Jackass" stunts as always, 
but gladly I was mistaken. 

I cannot decide who is 
my favorite performer 
between Margera and the 
infamous Steve-0. Both are 
cute, at least in my opinion, 
and both are absolutely 
hilarious. 

Steve-0 did two things 
that will forever stick in my 
mind. One, he pierced the 
side of his lip with a fish 
hook and let Pontius cast 



him out to see to go shark 
fishing (He kicked one of 
them in the head). The sec- 
ond one involved a beer 
bong and a hole in which no 
beer should ever be put. 

Of course, not to be out- 
done, Margera's poor family, 
Phil and Ape as we so lov- 
ingly know them as, was 
brought into this second 
movie. In one skit, Margera 
went into his parents room 
in the middle of the night 
and replaced his father with 
another fat man, who began 
to fondle Ape. 

This movie was not a let 
down at all. I think that 1 
could go back and see it two 
or three more times and still 
not be disappointed. 

A word to the wise 
though, when a horse 
appears on screen, brace 
yourself. Don't say I didn't 
warn you. 



Pafle 10 



Tffi CIARION CALL 



September 28. 2006 



flmilieis^ 



lirpek Ids, Travel, l^^mplipcnl, For Kent, kmmk and lieneml Ids 




Congrats to Jersey on Chair 

of the week! 

-ir AZ 

Congrats to Steph Corso on 
sister of the week! 
'^ AZ 

All eyes are on you Corso! 
- » AZ 




Clarion Dance Marathon is 
selling crafts at Wal-Mart 
on Saturday 10-4. 

"Superman Returns" show- 
times Thursday & Friday 8 
p.m. MPR. Saturday at 8 
p.m. Gemmell Food Court. 

Want to find out who the 
King and Queen of Clarion 
are? Come out to the pep 
rally on Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. 

FIZZ! FOCUS! FUEL 
GOOD with LIFT-OFF! 
NEW Effervescent Energy 
Drink Fight fatigue ~ 



Improve Mental 

Performance. Contact SAN- 
DRA AMATO Local 
Herbalife Independent 
Distributor (814) 764-3446 
www.getliftoffnow.com/ 
samato. 

Beautiful blue electric gui- 
tar for sale. Includes 10/w. 
amp, case, electric tuner 
and more. Contact 
s_sdkurtz@cIarion.edu 

Brand new TV show for 
WCUB-TV similar to SNL. 

If you are interested, or 
would like more informa- 
tion, please email Tom 
McMeekin, WCUB 

Production Manager, at 
s_tjmcmeekin@cIarion.edu. 
For other information about 
WCUB-TV, contact Station 
Manager Dan Rinkus at 
s_dprinku8@cIarion.edu. 




in 



Inexpensive apartment 
Shippenville, Pa, call 814 
782-3270 



One bedroom apt. fully fur- 
nished. Available Fall 2007- 
Spring 2008. Accomodates 
1-2. Call Patty at 814-746- 
3121 or 814 229 1683. www. 
Iakenapartment8.com 

Two Bedroom apt. FuUy ftir- 
niflhed. Available Fall 2007- 
Spring 2008. Call Patty at 
814-745-3121 or 814-229- 
1683. www. lakenapart- 
ment8.com 

A selection of houses and 
apts. available for Fall 2007- 
Spring 2008. Some close to 
campus. Fully furnished. 
Accomodations from 1-8 
people. Call Patty at 814- 
746-3121 or 814-229- 1683. 
www. Iakenapartment8.com 

Room in Victorian Home 
close to University, reason- 
abe, includes all utilities & 
cable. Available Fall & 
Spring. Call Rebecca 814- 
226 6442 or after 1 p.m. 
814-226 5651. 

Serious Students! Are you 
looking for a FREE PLACE 
to live? Do you like horses? 



We offer free room and 
board in our home for occa- 
sional chores and house sit- 
ting. 7 miles from campus. 
Call Gwen at 814- 379 3759 
or gwwilL9@pennswood8.net 

Tlu'ee bedroom house* 

accomodates up to 4, onj 
campus located on Wilson* 
Ave., semi-furnished, no, 
pets. Call for info 814-772- • 
9094 or 814-694 0981. • 




YAY! 
-Amy 



Travel with 

year's top 10 

Destinations! 

guaranteed! 

commissions. 

www.statravel 

800-648-4849. 

Discounts. 



STS to this 

Spring Break 

Best deals 

Highest rep 

Visit 

.com or call 1- 

Great Group 



Hi Mom! 
~ 1^ Shasta 



House for rent, with five 
bedrooms/2-baths for five 
students. Available for 
spring and fall 2007 and 
spring 2008. Washer, Dryer. 
Stove and Refrigerator 
included, off street parking, 
$1050.00 per semester per 
student -i- utilities. CaU 814" 
226-8185 and leave a mes 
sage. 

SILVER SPRING 
RENTALS- Apartments for 
2-4 people & Houses for 3-8 
people available for the Fall 
2007/Spring 2008 semes- 
ters. Call Barb at (814) 379- 
9721 for more information. 




Go Steelers! 



Hi*Vane3sa! 
- Sarah- 



Party Time! 



t-dub, 

vou best be ready for A.L.F 

bia! 

-V g*star 

Dom, 

I like your new shampoo. 

-Amy 




Fall is here 
Jen & Carrie, 



Miss Angle, 

You best be spending some 

nights on my couch over 

A.L.F. 

-Me 

Chocolate Kissable, 
What a wonderful weekend. 
I am very proud that you 
survived even though you 
did happen to go a little 
crazy. See you soon. 

- If Puppy Chow 

Dave, 

Thanks for being my inspi- 
ration. 

- V Steph 

PennAEYC/ACEI. 
Thanks for all of your hard 
work on the float. Job well 
done. 

Em, 

You're my favorite! 

-Dan 



Take The Clarion CaU "Celebrity Mess-ups" Quiz! 
by Bryan Bingham 

1. Which celebrity was arrested for possessing pills with 
out a perscription and also found with marijuana? 

a) James Woods c) Edward Furlong 

b) Macaulay Culkin d) Lou Rowles 

2. This celebrity got out of his car in a traffic jam, grabbed 
another motorist by the throat, and kicked in the side of 
his vehicle. 

a) Eric Roberts c) DMX 

b) Danny Bonaduce d) Rick Flair 

3. This celebrity was arrested for causing a bar fight in 
North Carolina. 

a) Robert Downey Jr. c) Vince Vaughn 

b) Sid Vicious d) Nick Carter 

4. This celebrity was arrested after eluding arrest for 
driving his Bentley 109 mph on the highway? 

a) Chris Tucker c) Fabolous 

b) Nikki Sixx d) Billy Joe Armstrong 

5. This celebrity was arrested for trying to sneak a gun on 
a plane. 

a) Dennis Rodman c) Jack White 

b) Snoop Dogg d) Christian Slater 



6.This celebrity was arrested for spouse abuse. 

a) Larry King c) Tommy Lee 

b) Micky Rourke d) Al Pacino 



7. This celebrity was arrested on battery charges. 

a) Pamela Anderson c) Juliette Lewis 

b) Carmen Electra d) Zsa Zsa Gabor 

8. This celebrity was arrested after police found coccaine 
in her car after an accident. 

a) Janis Joplin c) Yasmine Bleeth 

b) Nate Dogg d) Kid Rock 

9. This celebrity was charged with manslaughter after 
a woman died at one of his parties. 

a) Fatty Arbuckle c) 50 Cent 

b) Woody Harrelson d) Young Buck 

10. This celebrity was arrested twice in one year for 
gun possession. 

a) Frank Sinatra c) Eminem 

b) C Murder d) Axl Rose 



'OQI. 'B-6 '0'8 'qz 'q'9 'P'S 'B> 'oe 'P3 'q t :sjaMsue 



Look for chances to win prizes from our exci 



CMgivM 




Upcoming Events: 

The Black Student Union will host a Uj 
Synching Contest from 7- 10 p.m, in Hj 
Chapel on Sept, 29. Come perform 
your favorite artisti 

Homecoming Pep-raily Oct 5 at 7 p.i 
Tippin Gymnasium 

Open Mic Night, Oct 10 ax 8 p m 
Gemmell Ritazza 

lUP Football Pus trip, Oct. 14. Cosr 

Take a bus trip to NYC to The PhantorlT 
the Opera. The trip is Saturday Nov. 
Departure at 6 am. Cost $25 | 

Oct. 9, The Craft Series will be makirKfl 

picture frames. Room 248 Gemmeii^ 

8-10 p.m. 

Try-outs for "CUP's Got Broadv.ay Taj 



'•■.•il 



will be held Oct. 10 at 6 p 
Gemmell. Auditioners must 
minute song prepare.; 
The actual show will be held 0^ 
p.m. in Hart Chapei. 
contact Amy s_aefaiola@ciar!on. 
or Sara s_.sjpiHing@clarion.edu 




Becky Hebel 

Junior, Elem./ Special Ed. 
"I would want to control 
people's height." 




Jenifer Poblete 

''If you were a 
superhero, what 

special power 

would you want 

and why? '' 




Seth Hampton 

Senior, Music Education 

"I would want to move things 

with my mind." 






Tara Haupt 

Sophomore, Musical Theatre 

"I would manipulate time so I could go back 

and stop badness before it begins." 



Randall Oaks 

Freshman, Music Education 

"Mind control, so I could make people do 

whatever I wanted them to." 



Alisha M ellish 

Sophomore, Elem./ Early Childhood 

"I want to be able to change people's minds 

when they make a stupid decision." 



Lindsey Allison 

Junior, Music Education 

"I want to be able to teleport and move 

things with my mind." 




September 28. 2006 



TfflS CLARION CALL 



Page 11 



Tennis team travels to 
Bloomsburg for ITA Regionals 



Chris Parks 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_csparKsOclarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept 26 - The 
Golden Eagle Tennis team 
has been rather busy as of 
late. Just two weekends ago 
they went 3-0 in three key 
matches to set them at 3-1 
for the season. 

Millersville came to 
town last Tuesday and the 
Golden Eagles lost a heart- 
breaker 5-4 to their PSAC 
East rivals. 

This past weekend the 
Golden Eagles traveled to 
Bloomsburg for the 
Intercollegiate Tennis 

Association (ITA) Eastern 
Regional. It pits some of the 



best teams from the east 
coast as well as familiar 
PSAC opponents like 
Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania and Calif- 
ornia University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Junior Amy Robertson 
highlighted the Golden 
Eagles in the single's tour- 
nament winning her first 
two matches against Eleni 
Speyer 8-2 and then defeat- 
ing Roxanne Gieda 8-1 
before losing in the third 
round to Skahir Willett. 

Junior Corin Rombach 
went 1-1 in the singles tour- 
nament defeating lUP's 
Caitlin Heston before losing 
to Maddie Smith in the sec- 
ond frame. 

Highlighting the women 
in the double's tournament 



was the team of Lisa 
Baumgartner and Amy 
Robertson who made it to 
the quarterfinal round win- 
ning two matches on the 
tournament. 

The team may have a 
short season but they have a 
lot of matches left before 
this season ends in October. 

The Golden Eagles 
played Grove City 

Wednesday and have a date 
with Georgian Court on 
Friday at home at 4 p.m. 

Clarion must also start 
gearing up for the PSAC 
championships which take 
place during ALF in 
Shippensburg. Lots of work 
left for this team, but lots of 
positive results have been 
recorded. 



Brunell downplays Sunday's 
reunion with Jacl<sonvllle 



Jason La Canfora 
Washington Post 

WASHINGTON 
Quarterback Mark Brunell 
admittedly does not show 
much of a sentimental side 
in public, and is playing 
down the significance of fac- 
ing his former franchise 
when Jacksonville comes to 
FedEx Field on Sunday. But 
the afternoon will no doubt 
be special to him, as he 
reconnects with people he 
once shared a daily bond 
with in helping take the 
Jaguars to the cusp of the 
Super Bowl. 

This game comes amid 
what has already been a 
topsy-turvy season for 
Brunell. He is learning a 



new offense and struggled 
the first two weeks, then set 
an NFL record with 22 
straight completions in 
Sunday's victory at 
Houston. That performance 
brought a reprieve from 
some of the criticism he had 
been hearing and now he is 
preparing to face a domi- 
nant defense in another 
important game which hap- 
pens to come against an 
organization that was once 
the fulcrum of his life. 

"There's quite a few 
guys I know there, and a lot 
of staff," Brunell said. "I 
look forward to seeing some 
old friends, some old team- 
mates, but this is a big game 
for me, personally, simply 
because we want to be 2-2; 
2-2 is very different from 1- 



3, and hopefully we get this 
win. It will be difficult, and 
we've got some tough work 
ahead." 

Brunell spent the bulk 
of his career with 
Jacksonville, establishing 
himself as a starter there, 
going to the Pro Bowl and 
leading the franchise to the 
AFC Championship game. 
This will be his first time 
facing the Jaguars, his team 
from 1995 to 2003. 

He said he is still friend- 
ly with tight end Kyle Brady 
and tailback Fred Taylor as 
well as the equipment and 
training staffs, and also 
served as a veteran pres- 
ence around young quarter- 
back Byron Leftwich during 
his last season in 
Jacksonville. 



Bengals take advantage of turnovers in win over Steelers 



Mark Maske 
Washington Post 



PITTSBURGH - The Cinci- 
nnati Bengals celebrated 
their way off the field, but 
not excessively. They gloat- 
ed a little bit in their 
postgame locker room, but 
not too much. Three games 
into the fourth season of 
Coach Marvin Lewis's 
revival program, the one- 
time league laughingstocks 
are one of the best teams in 
the NFL and they know it. 

They now expect to win, 
even on the road against the 
reigning Super Bowl cham- 
pion on a day when their 
quarterback fumbles three 
times and throws two inter- 
ceptions. The Bengals hung 
tough Sunday at Heinz 
Field and converted two key 
fourth-quarter turnovers 
into immediate touchdowns 
to escape with a 28-20 tri- 
umph over the mistake- 
prone Pittsburgh Steelers. 

"In the past, we proba- 
bly would have folded early 
on when things weren't 
going our way," said Bengals 
safety Kevin Kaesviharn, 
who sealed the victory with 
an end-zone interception 
with 10 seconds to play. "We 
just would lose hope. Now 
we know we have a good 
chance to beat anyone, and 
we hung in there. It was a 



good win for us, and we just 
keep moving on." 

Steelers quarterback 
Ben Roethlisberger threw 
three interceptions in his 
second straight shaky out- 
ing since returning to the 
lineup. The defending 
champs beat the Miami 
Dolphins in the NFL's sea- 
son-opening game with 
Charlie Batch filling in for 
Roethlisberger, who'd 

undergone an emergency 
appendectomy four days 
earlier But the Steelers (l- 
2) were shut out last 
Monday night in 

Jacksonville in 

Roethlisberger's season 
debut, and now they have 
fallen two games off the lead 
in the AFC North. 

"It's a game that, when 
you look at it as I sit here 
right now, it's going to eat at 
you for a couple weeks," 
Steelers Coach Bill Cowher 
said. "There were a lot of 
self-inflicted plays out 
there. When you do that 
against a good football 
team, they're going to make 
you pay. And they did." 

Roethlisberger threw 
two end-zone interceptions, 
the first of which came in 
the second quarter as the 
Steelers tried to add to a 7-0 
lead. Cowher also was 
seething afterward about a 
pair of penalties, one for an 
excessive touchdown cele- 
bration and another for 




Bethany Ron/The Clarion Call 

Tough Loss- Troy Polmalu and Jeff Hartings stand on the side- 
line during Sunday's 28-20 loss to the Bengals. 



taunting after a big hit. But 
the miscues that were most 
costly to the Steelers were 
lost fumbles in the fourth 
quarter by punt returner 
Ricardo Colclough and back- 
up tailback Verron Haynes. 
Each time, the Bengals 
(3-0) took possession in 
Pittsburgh territory and 
scored a touchdown on the 



next play. 

Bengals quarterback 
Carson Palmer threw four 
touchdown passes, two to 
Chris Henry and two to fel- 
low wide receiver T.J. 
Houshmandzadeh. But he 
was sacked six times and 
was fortunate the Bengals 
recovered two of his three 
fumbles. 



"1 put the ball on the 
ground too many times," 
Palmer said. "It shows how 
good your team is when 
you're playing a good team 
and your quarterback does"t 
play very well, and you win 
anyway." 

The Bengals showed 
their versatility on offense. 
While tailback Rudi 
Johnson was bottled up and 
wideout Chad Johnson was 
drawing defensive attention 
en route to a one-catch 
peformance, Houshm- 

andzadeh had nine catches 
for 94 yards in his first 
game of the season after 
being sidelined by an ailing 
foot. 

"I'm glad we had a game 
like this where we showed 
the world, showed our divi- 
sion, showed everybody we 
can win this way," Chad 
Johnson said. 

The Steelers, who got 
133 rushing yards by tail- 
back Willie Parker, scored a 
touchdown on their opening 
drive and then harassed 
Palmer into a three-play 
sequence in which he fum- 
bled twice and then threw 
an interception. 

The Steelers marched to 
a first down at the 
Cincinnati six yard line, but 
Roethlisberger threw wide 
of tight end Heath Miller on 
the opening play of the sec- 
ond quarter and had the ball 
intercepted in the end zone 



by safety Madieu Williams. 
The Bengals drove 97 yards 
to a tying touchdown and, 
after blocking a field goal 
attempt by the Steelers' Jeff 
Reed, took the lead on a 
Palmerto-Henry touchdown 
five seconds before halftime. 

The Steelers moved in 
front in the third quarter on 
a 37-yard field goal by Reed 
and a fourth-and-goal touch- 
down run by Parker from 
the one set up by an inter- 
ception. 

Midway through the 
fourth quarter, Colclough 
had a punt squirt through 
his hands, then he botched 
the pickup. The Bengals 
took over at the Steelers 9, 
and Palmer zipped a go- 
ahead touchdown pass to 
Houshmandzadeh. Haynes 
lost his fumble to give the 
Bengals possession at the 
Steelers 30, and 

Houshmandzadeh grabbed 
Palmer's lob for his second 
touchdown in a 54-second 
span. 

Reed's 36-yard field goal 
pulled the Steelers to within 
eight points with just more 
than three minutes to go, 
and they got the ball back 
and drove to the Cincinnati 
16. But on third and 10, 
Roethlisberger tried to get 
the ball to wide receiver 
Nate Washington over the 
middle and Kaesviharn 
stepped in for the intercep- 
tion. 





9/26/D6 



Flag Football Results 



Colt45's 


Freeballers 


56-19 


Cheefe 


The Stag's 


39-36 


Dynast)' 


Wait 4 it 


69-6 


Lumberjack 


Dirty S. Boyz 


40-34 


Game Time 


Black Out Boys 


31-0 


Lunatic's 


ClubX 


64-21 


Dudes 


Nuphics 


40-24 


9/25/Q6 






Saints 


just Ball 


57-32 


Mac Attack 


Just Ball 


43-31 


Your Mom 


YGFT 


60-10 


Stags 


Little Giants 


43-25 


Dudes 


Checfe 


54-19 


Steel City 


Dynasty 


54-22 


9/21/06 






G Gnomes 


McNutter Butters 


76-14 


Colt 45 


Your Mom 


39-37 


Lunatics 


Water Buffalos 


70-16 


Dynasty 


Mac -Attack 


42-20 


Clarion CrazieStill Free BaIRn 


41-39 


3305 


ClubX 


37-26 


Lumberjacks 


Steelers 


42-21 


Saints 


Lunatics 


45-6 


9/20/06 






Crazy Joe 


Game Time 


44-26 


G Gnomes 


YGFT 


49-24 


Dirty S Boyz 


Free Bailers 


40-6 


Steel City 


Get'em Boys 


47-0 


Still Free Ball 


3305 


48-8 


Get'em Boyz 


Steelers 


20-8 


Clarion Crazi 


eColt45's 


45-18 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393- 1 667 



Dodgeball Results 

9/25/06 

Girl Scout Troop 4 l9Then.W.o 2-1 

Dynasty Girtynasty 2-0 

9131106 

Big Bois The Pitts 3-1 

Girl Scout Troop Trash Monkeys 2-1 





9/28/106 




Volleyball Results 

9/26/06 

TS Appeal Ligere 22-20,21 

JudeanPF The Cont. 21-17,21 
TheKillet^ Scurvy 21-13,21 

Pink Flamingo Spike Any 21-17,21 
9/25/06 

JudeanP Front 21-7,2 
21-6.2 



Intramurars on the Web 
clarlon.edu/intramurals 

Beach Volleyball Results 

9/26/06 

Ligers Satan's Little Helpers F 

9/25/06 

Delta Zeta Junior Mints F 



At's 

Ath. Challenged A2X5 

9/21/06 

Ath. Challeng 

The Killers 

B.K Lounge 

9/20/06 

Off Shower 

Sex Appeal 

Ligers 



The Crew 21-17,2 
Judean People 21-9,21 



-14 
-14 
-15 
-15 

1-19 
1-9 

-19 
18 



A2X5 

The Fl^ Itch 
Team 
The Cont. 



21-12,21-11 



21-8,21 
21-6,21 
21-11,2 



■6 
-9 
1-14 



Outdoor Soccei Results 

9/26/06 

Speicher Delta Zeta F 

QuahogWar. Internationals 5-1 

Team Crash Nads 3-1 

9asm 

Giggity Tutelo F 

Moses & Kids Dirty South Boys F 

9^1/06 

Moses and Kids Giggities 5-3 

9/20/06 

QuahogWairiors Nads 5-1 



United Way 5 K Run 

Saturday, 9/30 9:00 am. 

Kick off the Autumn Leaf festivities with 
a 5K road race to benefit the United 
Way. For more info - stop by the Rec 
Center, or call 226-8760. All pre- 
registered racers will receive a long 
sleeve T-shirt and food provided by 
Sheetz. Special cost is ^6 for all CUP 
students, Stop by the REC Center for 
details. Race day registration starts at 
7:30am and ends at 8;4Sam. The road 
race begins at the corner of Main St and 
2"*^ Ave. and ends on the CUP track. 
Cash prizes and awards to winners of 
various divisions! 

9/25 &26 Ultim.ite Fil.^bee Re.siilts 

GUss Box of Einotcn Bonus F 

Glass Box of Ejnotbn Sat^s Little Helpesrs F 

I Pitch Softball Tournament 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14™ 
COST $20 PER TEAM 

CLARION COUNTS PARK 
Tourney will be limited to the first 12 teams 
to register by 10/12 and pay the fee. This is 
a Co-Rec Tournament and all rules are 
posted at the REC Center. 



Page 10 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



September 28. 2006 



(ImiMs 



kni \t Tiiiii'l fjiipliiyiiii'iil For lli'iil, hmmk anil \m\i tih 



6iR£ElKS 



wmmmm 



Congrats tu -Jeiscv on Chair 

of tht' wi'ok! 

-1> \/ 

Congrats to Steph Corso on 
sister of the week! 
-^ W 

All eyes are on you Corsol 
IT A/. 

Clarion Dance Marathon is 
selling crafts at Wal-Mart 
on Saturday 10-1. 

"Superman Returns" show- 
times Thursday & P'riday 8 
p.m. Ml'K, Saturday at 8 
p.m. (lemmell Kood Court. 

Want to find out who the 
King and Queen of Clarion 
are? Come out to the pep 
rally on Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. 

FIZZ! FOCUS! FUEL 
GOOD with LIFT-OFF! 
Nf]W Effervescent Energy 
Drink Fight fatigue 



Improve Mental 

Performance. Contact SAN- 
I)K.\ AMATO Local 

Herhalife Independent 

Distributor (814) 764-344(5 
www.getliftoffnow.com/ 
samato. 

Beautiful blue electric gui- 
tar for sale. Includes 10/w. 
amp. case, electric tuner 
and more. Contact 

s_sdkurtzi«'clarion.edu 

Brand new TV show for 
W(T1BTV .similar to SNL. 

If you are interested, or 
would like more informa- 
tion, please email Tom 
McMeekin. WCUB 

Production Manager, at 
s_tjmcmeekin(rt'clarion.edu. 
For other information about 
WCUB-TV, contact Station 
Manager Dan Rinkus at 
s_dprinkusi^'i'clarion.edu. 







Inexpensive apartment in 
Shippenville, Pa, call 814- 
782-3270 



One bedroom apt. fully fur- 
nished. .Available Fall 2007- 
Spring 2008. .Accomodates 
1-2. Call Patty at 814-745- 
3121 or 814 229 1683. www. 
Iakenapartment8.com 

Two Bedroom apt. Fully fur- 
nished. Available Fall 2007- 
Spring 2008. Call Patty at 
811-745,3121 or 814229- 
1683. www. lakenapart- 
ments.com 

.A selection of houses and 
apts. available for Fall 2007- 
Spring 2008. Some close to 
campus. Fully furnished. 
Accomodations from 1-8 
people. Call Pattv at 814- 
7453121 or 814229 1683. 
www. lakenapartments.com 

Room in Victorian Home 
close to University, reason- 
abe, includes all utilities & 
cable. Available Fall & 
Spring. Call Rebecca 814- 
226 5442 or after 1 p.m. 
814226 5651. 

Serious Students! .Are you 
looking for a FREE PLACE 
to live'.' Do vou like horses? 



We offer free room and 
board in our home for occa- 
sional chores and house sit- 
ting. 7 miles from campus. 
Call Gwen at 814 379 3759 
or gwwills@penn8wood8.net 

•Three bedroom house* 

, accomodates up to I. onj 
•campus located on Wilson* 
a.Ave., .semi-furnished, no, 
•pets. Call for info 814 772 • 
19094 or 814 594 0981. I 

House for rent, with five 
bedrooms/2baths for five 
students. Available for 
spring and fall 2007 and 
spring 2008. Washer, l)r-yer. 
Stove and Refrigerator 
included, off street parking. 
$1050.00 per semester per 
student + utilities. Call 814 
226-8186 and leave a mes 
sage. 

SILVER S P R I N C. 
RENTALS- Apartments for 
24 people & Houses for 38 
people available for the Fall 
2007/Spring 2008 .semes- 
ters. Call Barb at (814) 379" 
9721 for more information. 



TfcAVtL 



v.w 

.\inv 



Tra\('l with STS to this 
year's top 10 Spring Break 
Destinations! Best deals 
guaranteed! Highest rep 
commissions. Visit 

www.ststravel.com or call 1- 
800-(vl8-|849. Great Group 
Discounts. 

PERSONALS 



1 1 Mom! 
V Shasta 



Go Steelers! 



HA'ani'ssa! 
Sarah 



Partv Time! 



tdub, 

you best be readv for A.L.F 
bia! 
1> g*star 

Dom, 

1 like your new shampoo. 
.Amy 

Fall is here 
Jen & Carrie, 



Miss .Angle. 

You best be spending some 

nights on mv couch over 

.\.L.F 

Me 

Chocolate Kissable, 
What a wonderful weekend. 
I am very proud that you 
survived even though you 
did happen to go a little 
crazy. See you soon. 
- V Puppy Chow 

l)a\e. 

Thanks for being my inspi- 
ration. 
» Steph 

PennAEYC/ACEI. 
Thanks for all of your hard 
work on the float. Job well 
done. 

Em. 

You're mv favorite! 

-Dan 




Take The Clarion CaU "Celebrity Mess ups" Quiz! 
by Bryan Bingham 

1 . Which celebrity was arrested for possessing pills with 
out a perscription and also found with marijuana? 

a) James Woods c) Edward Furlong 

b) Macaulay Culkin d) Lou Rowles 

2. This celebrity got out of his car in a traffic jam, grabbed 
another motorist by the throat, and kicked in the side of 
his vehicle. 

a) Eric Roberts c) DMX 

b) Danny Bonaduce d) Rick Flair 

3. This celebrity was arrested for causing a bar fight in 
North Carolina. 

a) Robert Downey Jr. c) Vince Vaughn 

b) Sid Vicious d) Nick Carter 

I. This celebrity was arrested after eluding arrest for 
driving his Bentley 109 mph on the highway? 

a) Chris Tucker c) Fabolous 

b) .Nikki Sixx d) Billy Joe Armstrong 

5. This celebrity was arrested for trying to sneak a gun on 
a plane. 

a) Dennis Rodman c) Jack White 

b) Snoop Dogg d) Christian Slater 



6. This celebrity was arrested for spouse abuse. 

a) Larry King c) Tommy Lee 

b) Micky Rourke d) Al Pacino 



7. This celebrity was arrested on battery charges. 

a) Pamela Anderson c) Juliette Lewis 

b) Carmen Electra d) Zsa Zsa Gabor 

8. This celebrity was arrested after police found coccaine 
in her car after an accident. 

a) Janis Joplin c) Yasmine Bleeth 

b) Nate Dogg d) Kid Rock 

9. This celebrity was charged with manslaughter after 
a woman died at one of his parties. 

a) Fatty Arbuckle c) 50 Cent 

b) Woody Harrelson d) Young Buck 

10. This celebrity was arrested twice in one year for 
gun possession. 

a) Frank Sinatra c) Eminem 

b) C Murder d) Axl Rose 



'OQl. 'B-6 '0'8 'qz 'qg 'P'Q 'ep 'oe 'pg 'q i. :sjaMsuB 



Look for chances to win prizes from our exclusive Clarion Call giveaways. 



Upcoming Events: 

The Black Student Union will host a Up 

Synching Contest from 7- 10 p.nn, in Hart 

Chapel on Sept. 29. Come perform as 

your favorite artist! 

Homecoming Pep-rally Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. in 
Tippin Gymnasium. 

Open Mic Night, Oct. 10 at 8 p.m. 
Gemmell Ritazza 

lUP Football bus trip, Oct. 14. Cost $5 

Take a bus trip to NYC to The Phantom of 

the Opera. The trip is Saturday, Nov. 18: 

Departure at 6 a.m. Cost $25 

Oct. 9, The Craft Series will be making 

picture frames. Room 248 Gemmell. 

8-10 p.m. 

Try-outs for "CUP's Got Broadway Talent" 

will be held Oct. 10 at 8 p.m. in 248 

Gemmell. Auditioners must have a 6 

minute song prepared. 

The actual show will be held Oct. 29 at 7 

p.m. in Hart Chapel. 

contact Amy s_aefaiola@clarion.edu 

or Sara s_sjpilling@clarion.edu 




Hit KN Hi:bel 

Juniok, Ei I :m./ Si^kciai, Ed. 
"I would want to control 
people's height." 




Jenifer Poblete 



''If you were a 
superhero, what 

special power 

would you want 

and why? " 




Skim Hampton 

SiNioR, Mdsic Fmx c afion 

"I would want to move things 

with mv mind." 






Taka Haiipt 

SolMlOMOKh. MuSltAI. TlUArRK 

"1 would manipulate time so I could go back 
and stop badness before it begins." 



R.vNOALi. Oaks 

Eri SHMAN, Music Education 

"Mind control, so I could make people do 

whatever I wanted them to." 



Alisha Meulish 

SoPHOMORH, El iM./ Early Chii dhood 

"I want to be able to change people's minds 

when they make a stupid decision." 



LiNIJSKV Al.l.lSON 

JviNioR, Mrsic F^ni!(Aii<)N 

"I want to be able to teleport and move 

thing.s with my mind." 




September 28. 2006 



THE CLARION CALL 



Page 11 



Tennis team travels to 
Bloomsburgfor ITA Regionals 



Chris Parks 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_csparks®clanon.edu 

CI^\RION, Sept 26 - The 
Golden Eagle Tennis team 
has been rather busy as of 
late. Just two weekends ago 
they went 3-0 in three key 
matches to set them at 3-1 
for the season. 

Millersville came to 
town last Tuesday and the 
Golden Eagles lost a heart- 
breaker 5-4 to their PSAC 
East rivals. 

This past weekend the 
Golden Eagles traveled to 
Bloomsburg for the 
Intercollegiate Tennis 

As.sociation (ITA) Eastern 
Regional. It pits some of the 



best teams from the east 
coast as well as familiar 
PS.\C opponents like 
Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania and Calif- 
ornia University of 
Penn.sylvania. 

Junior /\my Robertson 
highlighted the Golden 
Eagles in the single's tour- 
nament winning her first 
two matches against Eleni 
Speyer 8-2 and then defeat- 
ing Roxanne Gieda 8-1 
before losing in the third 
round to Skahir Willett. 

Junior Corin Rombach 
went 1-1 in the singles tour- 
nament defeating lUP's 
Caitlin Heston before losing 
to Maddie Smith in the sec- 
ond frame. 

Highlighting the women 
in the double's tournament 



was the team of Lisa 
Baumgartner and Amy 
Robert.son who made it to 
the quarterfinal round win- 
ning two matches on the 
tournament. 

The team may have a 
short sea.son but they have a 
lot of matches left before 
this season ends in October. 

The Golden Eagles 
played Grove City 

Wednesday and have a date 
with Georgian Court on 
Friday at home at 1 p.m. 

Clarion must also start 
gearing up for the PS.XC 
championships which take 
place during .\LF in 
Shippensburg. Lots of work 
left for this team, but lots of 
positive results have been 
recorded. 



Brunell downplays Sunday's 
reunion with Jacksonville 



Jason La Canfora 
Washington Post 

WASH1N(JT()N 
Quarterback Mark Brunell 
admittedly does not show 
much of a .sentimental side 
in public, and is playing 
down the significance of fac- 
ing his former franchise 
when Jacksonville comes to 
FedEx Field on Sunday. Hut 
the afternoon will no doubt 
be special to him. as he 
reconnects with people he 
once shared a daily bond 
with in helping take the 
Jaguars to the cusp of the 
Super Bowl. 

This game comes amid 
what has already been a 
topsy-turvy season for 
Brunell. He is learning a 



new offense and struggled 
the first two weeks, then set 
an NFL record with 22 
straight completions in 
Sunday's victory at 
Houston. That performance 
brought a reprieve from 
some of the criticism he had 
been hearing and now he is 
preparing to face a domi- 
nant defense in another 
important game which hap- 
pens to come against an 
organization that was once 
the fulcrum of his life. 

"There's quite a few 
guys I know there, and a lot 
of staff," Brunell said, "I 
look forward to seeing sonu' 
old friends, some old team- 
mates, but this is a big game 
for me, personally, simply 
becau.se we want to be 22: 
2-2 is verv different from T 



'A, and hopefully we get this 
win. It will be difficult, and 
we've got some tough work 
ahead." 

Brunell spent the bulk 
of his career with 
Jacksonville, establishing 
himself as a starter there, 
going to the Pro Bowl and 
leading the franchise to the 
AFC Championship game. 
This will be his first time 
lacing the Jaguars, his team 
from 199r) to 2003. 

He said he is still friend- 
ly with tight end Kyle Brady 
and tailback Fred Taylor as 
well as the equipment and 
training staffs, and also 
.served as a veteran pres- 
ence around young quarter- 
back Byron Leftwich during 
his last season in 
Jacksonville. 



Bengals take advantage of turnovers in win over Steelers 



Mark Maske 
Washington Post 



PITTSBURGH - The Cinci- 
nnati Bengals celebrated 
their way off the field, but 
not excessively. They gloat- 
ed a httle bit in their 
postgame locker room, but 
not too much. Three games 
into the fourth season of 
Coach Marvin Lewis's 
revival program, the one- 
time league laughingstocks 
are one of the best teams in 
the NFL and they know it. 

They now expect to win, 
even on the road against the 
reigning Super Bowl cham- 
pion on a day when their 
quarterback fumbles three 
times and throws two inter- 
ceptions. The Bengals hung 
tough Sunday at Heinz 
F'ield and converted two key 
fourth-quarter turnovers 
into immediate touchdowns 
to escape with a 28-20 tri- 
umph over the mistake- 
prone Pittsburgh Steelers. 

"In the past, we proba- 
bly would have folded early 
on when things weren't 
going our way," said Bengals 
safety Kevin Kaesviharn, 
who sealed the victory with 
an end-zone interception 
with 10 seconds to play. "We 
just would lose hope. Now 
we know we have a good 
chance to beat anyone, and 
we hung in there. It was a 



good win for us, and we just 
keep moving on." 

Steelers quarterback 
Ben Roethlisberger threw 
three interceptions in his 
second straight shaky out- 
ing since returning to the 
lineup. The defending 
champs beat the Miami 
Dolphins in the NFL's sea- 
son-opening game with 
Charlie Batch filling in for 
Roethlisberger, who'd 

undergone an emergency 
appendectomy four days 
earlier. But the Steelers (1- 
2) were shut out last 
Monday night in 

Jacksonville in 

Roethlisberger's season 
debut, and now they have 
fallen two games off the lead 
in the AFC North. 

"It's a game that, when 
you look at it as I sit here 
right now, it's going to eat at 
you for a couple weeks," 
Steelers Coach Bill Cowher 
said. "There were a lot of 
self-inflicted plays out 
there. When you do that 
against a good football 
team, they're going to make 
you pay. And they did." 

Roethlisberger threw 
two end-zone interceptions, 
the first of which came in 
the second quarter as the 
Steelers tried to add to a 7-0 
lead. Cowher also was 
seething afterward about a 
pair of penalties, one for an 
excessive touchdown cele- 
bration and another for 




Bethany Ross/The Clarion Call 

Tough Loss- Troy Polmalu and Jeff Hartings stand on the side- 
line during Sunday's 28-20 loss to the Bengals. 



taunting after a big hit. But 
the miscues that were most 
costly to the Steelers were 
lost fumbles in the fourth 
quarter by punt returner 
Ricardo Colclough and back- 
up tailback Verron Haynes. 
Each time, the Bengals 
(3-0) took possession in 
Pitt.sburgh territory and 
scored a touchdown on the 



next play. 

Bengals quarterback 
Carson Palmer threw four 
touchdown passes, two to 
Chris Henry and two to fel- 
low wide receiver T.J. 
Houshmandzadeh. But he 
was sacked six times and 
was fortunate the Bengals 
recovered two of his three 
fumbles. 



"1 put the ball on the 
ground too many times." 
Palmer said. "It shows how 
good your team is when 
you're playing a good team 
and your quarterback does''t 
play very well, and you win 
anyway." 

The Bengals showed 
their versatility on offense. 
While tailback Rudi 
Johnson was bottled up and 
wideout Chad Johnson was 
drawing defensive attention 
en route to a one-catch 
peformance, Houshm- 

andzadeh had nine catches 
for 94 yards in his first 
game of the season after 
being sidelined by an ailing 
foot. 

"I'm glad we had a game 
like this where we showed 
the world, showed our divi- 
sion, showed everybody we 
can win this way," Chad 
Johnson said. 

The Steelers, who got 
L33 rushing yards by tail- 
back Willie Parker, scored a 
touchdown on their opening 
drive and then harassed 
Palmer into a three-play 
sequence in which he fum- 
bled twice and then threw 
an interception. 

The Steelers marched to 
a first down at the 
Cincinnati six yard line, but 
Roethlisberger threw wide 
of tight end Heath Miller on 
the opening play of the sec- 
ond quarter and had the ball 
intercepted in the end zone 



by safety Madieu Williams. 
The Bengals drove 97 yards 
to a tying touchdown and, 
after blocking a field goal 
attempt by the Steelers' Jeff 
Reed, took the lead on a 
Palmer-to-Henry touchdown 
five seconds before halftime. 

The Steelers moved in 
front in the third quarter on 
a 37-yard field goal by Reed 
and a fourth-and-goal touch- 
down run by Parker from 
the one set up by an inter- 
ception. 

Midway through the 
fourth quarter, Colclough 
had a punt squirt through 
his hands, then he botched 
the pickup. The Bengals 
took over at the Steelers 9, 
and Palmer zipped a go- 
ahead touchdown pass to 
Houshmandzadeh. Haynes 
lost his fumble to give the 
Bengals possession at the 
Steelers 30. and 

Houshmandzadeh grabbed 
Palmer's lob for his second 
touchdown in a 54-second 
span. 

Reed's 36-yard field goal 
pulled the Steelers to within 
eight points with just more 
than three minutes to go, 
and they got the ball back 
and drove to the Cincinnati 
16. But on third and 10, 
Roethlisberger tried to get 
the ball to wide receiver 
.Nate Washington over the 
middle and Kaesviharn 
stepped in for the intercep- 
tion. 





9J76/06 Flag Football Results 



Colt45's Freebaliet^ 

Cheefs The Stag's 

Dynasty Wait 4 it 

Lumberjack Dirty S. Boyz 

Game Time Black Out Boys 

Lunatic's ClubX 

Dudes Nuphics 

msm 

Saints Just Ball 

Mac Attack Just Ball 

Your Mom YGFT 

Stags Little Giants 

Dudes Cheefs 

Steel City Dynasty 
9/21/06 

G Gnomes Mc Nutter Butters 

Colt 45 Your Mom 

Lunatics Water Buffalos 

Dyr-iast/ Mac -Attack 

Clarion CraileStill Free Ballin 



J 305 



ClubX 



Lumberjacks Steelers 

Saints Lunatics 
9/20/D6 

Craz)' Joe Game Time 

G Gnornes YGFT 

Dirty S Boyz Free Bailers 

Steel Ci^/ Get'em Boys 

Still Free Ball 3305 

Get'em Boyz Steelers 

Clarion Cra2leColt45's 



56-19 

39-36 

69-6 

40-34 

310 

64-21 

40-24 

57-32 
43-31 
60-10 
43-25 
54-19 
54-22 

76-14 

39-37 

70-16 

42-20 

41-39 

37-26 

42-21 

45-6 

44-26 

49-24 

40-6 

47-0 

48^ 

20^ 

45-18 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intrarrural, Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393-1667 



Dodgeball Results 



9i2sm 



2-1 
20 



Girl Scout Troop 4 l9The n.W.o 

Dynast/ Glrtynast/ 

91 7 i 106 

Big Bols The Pitts 

Girl Scout Troop Trash Monkeys 2-1 



-I 
J- 





9/28,06 




Volleyball Results 



22-20,21-14 
21-17,21-14 
21-13,21-15 
21-17.21-15 



9/26/06 

TS Appeal Llget^; 
Judeaj-i P F The Cont. 
The Killers Scur-vy 
Pink Flamingo Spike Any 
9/25/06 

At's Jude.ij-1 P Front 2 1-7,21-19 

Ath. Challenged A2X5 21-6,21-9 

9/2 1/06 

Ath. Challeng The Crew 2 1 -17, 2 I -1 9 
TheKillerv: |udean People 21-9,21-18 
B,K Lounge >^^X5 21-12,21-11 

9/20/06 

Off Shower The F^,' Itch 21-6,21-6 
Sex Appeal Team 2 I -^i, 2 1 -9 

The Corit. 



LIgers 



21-11,21-14 



IntramuraPs on the Web 
clanon.edu/intramurals 



Beach Volleyball Results 



9/26/06 

LIgers 
9/25/06 

Delta Zeta 



Satan's Little Helpers 



Junior Mints 



Outdooi Soccei Result.^ 

9.^26^06 

Sp etcher Delta Zeta P 

Qual-iogWat. Intetnalionals >1 

Teain Crash Nads 3-1 

9/25.06 

Giggity Ttitelo F 

M OS es & Kids Dirty S outh B oys F 

9/2V% 

Moses ^iiviPCids Giggities 5-3 

9,'2Q06 

Oual-iOffWaniors Nads 5-1 



United Way 5 K Run 

Saturday, 9/30 9:00 am. 

Kick off the Autumn Leaf festivities with 
a 5K road race to benefit the United 
Way, For more info - stop by the Rec 
Center, or call 226-8760. All pre- 
registered racers will receive a long 
sleeve T-shirt and food provided by 
Sheetz, Special cost is |6 for all CUP 
students. Stop by the REC Center for 
details. Race day registration starts at 
7:30am and ends at o:45am, The road 
race begins at the corner of Main St and 
2*'"^ Ave. and ends on the CUP track. 
Cash prizes and awa/'ds to v/inners of 
various divisions! 

9/25 &26 Ulruiinre Fnsbee ResxHts 

Gliis Box of Emotcn Bomas F 

GUss Box of Emoticin Sataii'? Litk Hdpa^ F 

I Pitch Softball Tournament 

S.ATURDAY, OCTOBER 14™ 
COST $20 PER TEAM 

CLARION COUNPf- PAPJ< 
Tourney will be limited to the fu^t 12 tean-e 
to register by 10/12 and p^ the fee. This is 
a Co -R.ee Tournament arid all rules are 
posted at the REC Center. 



Page 12 



Tm CLARION CALL 



September 28. 2006 




My, Fotftyi plap #10 lllQoinsliy rii Ten nis in ailion at Fenn M 



Cross Country teams face tough 
competition at Penn State Invite 



course, earning her 19th 
place among some of the 
best runners in the country. 

Junior Erin Richard fol- 
lowed in 38th place with a 
time of 22:56:40. Last year 
at PSAC's, Wheatley and 
Richard placed 20th and 
21st and are looking to 
improve this year after an 
incredible track season last 
year in which both runners 
earned top honors in the 
PSAC. 

Other top 200 finishers 
at the Penn State invita- 
tional for the Golden Eagles 
were Autumn Shaffer, 
Caitlin Palko, Kate Ehren- 
sberger and Suzanne 
Schwerer. Overall the 
women's team placed 16th 
among 25 squads competing 
in the invitational. 

The men's team was 
equally successful in their 
running. Junior Chris Clark 
lead the Eagles with a time 
of 26:56:95 which earned 
him a 29th place finish. 
Chris ran the race 2 Vi min- 
utes faster than he did his 
freshmen year, as well as 
finishing 3rd among all 
PSAC runners at the PSU 
invitational. Last year 



Katelyn Monrean 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kjmonrean(9clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 25 - In 
July, Jayson Resch had no 
idea that he would be in the 
midst of his first year head 
coaching Clarion Unive- 
rsity's Cross Country team. 
Last year he was a volun- 
teer coach for the cross 
country and track teams but 
due to the resignation of for- 
mer head coach, Daniel 
Caulfield, Coach Resch 
returned to assume the 
head coach position. 

On Saturday Sept. 23 
both the women's and men's 
cross country teams trav- 
eled to State College to take 
on teams from across the 
country at the Penn State 
Spiked Shoe Invitational. 

These teams included 
many Division I teams such 
as Penn State and Syracuse 
as well as many PSAC 
rivals. 

The women's team was 
lead by Senior Tasha 
Wheatley who made 
Saturday the best meet of 
her cross county career. She 
ran a personal best time of 
22:29:10 in the 6000 meter Clark, who finished 10th in 

Golden Eagles football puts up a fight 
against lOthi ranl<ed Bioomsburg 



the PSAC, is looking to 
place in the top runners this 
year at the PSAC champi- 
onships on Oct. 28 at 
Bioomsburg. 

Other Clarion runners 
finishing in the top 200 were 
Bill Herrmann, Sean 
McFarland, Josh Foulds, 
Travis Cyphert, Adam 
Sencek, and Jason South. 

Coach Jayson Resch is 
pleased with his team, espe- 
cially with some difficulties 
the team had the week prior 
to the meet with overcoming 
injuries and illness within 
the team. Resch said there 
was "big improvement in 
athletes" and "the team per- 
formed well overall but the 
meet helped to re-establish 
team goals." 

The Golden Eagles were 
defeated by a few teams 
that they had beaten earlier 
in the season, now they 
have focused the victories 
and defeats of the invita- 
tional into an attainable 
goal for the next meet at 
Penn State on Oct. 7th. The 
Golden Eagles will be com- 
peting in the United Way 5K 
on Sept. 30. 



Chris Parks 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_csparks@clarion.edu 

BLOOMSBURG, Sept. 23 - 
The Golden Eagles played 
right with Bioomsburg, the 
number 10 ranked team in 
Division II, for the first 30 
minutes of football. 
Problem is there are 60 min- 
utes in the game and a few 
miscues in the 2nd half 
downed the Golden Eagles 
for the fourth straight game 
by the score of 24-10. 

Clarion jumped out to a 
quick 10-0 lead thanks to a 
17 yard touchdown catch by 
tight end Matt Foradora 
from Mark Rupert and a 
Kyle Snoke 35 yard field 
goal. Snoke on the season is 
now three for four in field 
attempts and has it hit 7 
extra points! head coach Jay 
Foster has been pleased 
with his kicker's turnaround 
from last season. 

"Kyle has done all we've 
asked. He needs a Httle 
more height on his field 
goals but is doing well." 

Bioomsburg struck back 
just in time to end the first 
half on a Greg Masters 25 
yard touchdown pass from 
quarterback Dan Latorre to 
make it a 10-7 halftime 
score. In the second half, 
the 10th ranked Huskies got 
their act together and 
scored the next 17 points. 

Joe Koening hit a 25 
yard field goal to tie it up. 
Then running back for 
Bioomsburg, Jamar 

Brittingham scored on two 
touchdown runs. He fin- 
ished with 160 rushing 
yards on 23 carries and had 
two catches for 4 yards. 

Greg Masters paced the 
Husky receivers with 63 
yards and a touchdown. 
Defensively they came out 
in the second half and forced 
some key turnovers. 
Headlining the defense was 
Matt Smith with 9 tackles 
and Jesse Cooper with 7. 

The duo of Herb Carra- 
way and Pierre Odom com- 
bined on 7 catches for 104 
yards. Carraway has been 



battling some injuries this 
season, but Coach Foster is 
happy with his production, 
but still cautious with his 
knee. 

"Herb is slowly getting 
his knee back into playing 
shape. He still has a way to 
go before he is back 100 per- 
cent, but he is definitely 
starting to show some good 
signs." 

Defensively, the Golden 
Eagles played much better 
than the West Chester game 
and quarterback turned 



to hit now." 

Other studs on defense 
included Dwoan Woodard 
who had 5 tackles and 
Kevin Rigby with 3 stops 
and an interception. 

Clarion returns home 
this coming weekend for 
their second home and 1st 
PSAC-West game against 
rival Slippery Rock at 
Memorial Stadium with 
kickoff set at 6pm. 

Foster will coach 
against his former team for 
the first time on Saturday. 




Mike Cauvel/TTie Clarion Call 
Looking for a win - Kicker Kyle Snoke (15) and wide receiver 
Clint Brown (7) stand on the sideline during the Golden Eagles 
home opener. This Saturday they play Slippery Rock in Clarion. 



defensive back Erik Yonish, 
picked up an interception. 
Coach Foster continues to 
like this move from offense 
to defense. 

"Yonish continues to get 
better every week. He start- 
ed the season looking like a 
quarterback playing defen- 
sive back, but he is starting 



Foster was a defensive coor- 
dinator and assistant coach 
for 18 seasons at Slippery 
Rock before being named 
head coach at Clarion. 

The following weekend 
Clarion will be hosting 
Cheyney University during 
homecoming weekend. 



Golf team wins 
Wlieeling Jesuit Invite 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s_ekbowserttclarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 27 - On 
Sept. 26 and 27 the Clarion 
University Golf team trav- 
eled to Moundsville Country 
Club to participate in the 
Wheeling Jesuit Invitati- 
onal. 

The Golden Eagles were 
victorious for the second 
consecutive week, scoring a 
nine shot victory over 
California University. 

The Golden Eagles shot 
the low round each day of 
the tournament with a 297 
on the first day and a second 
day 291 for a 588. 
California shot a 597 to fin- 
ish in second just two shots 
ahead of third place finisher 
the University of Charle- 
ston. 

"It was a good win for 
us, we had the low round for 
both days," Coach Al Lefevre 
said. "That's what we are 
looking fot- this season is 
consistency." 

The low man for the 
Golden Eagles was junior 
Justin Moose. Moose shot a 
74 on the first day but came 
back to shot a 67, the second 
lowest round of the entire 
tournament, on Tuesday. 

Moose finished in a four- 
way tie for first place at last 



Soccer team snaps four 
game losing streal< 



Rob Rankin 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rwrankin®clarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 26 - After 
starting out conference play 
with a 3-2 victory over Lock 
Haven the Golden Eagles 
dropped their next four con- 
ference games. Clarion had 
lost five of its last seven 
games overall. 

The Golden Eagles 
snapped their losing streak 
with a 2-0 shutout over St. 
Vincent College on Sunday. 

After playing to a score- 
less tie at the end of the first 
half the Golden Eagles 
started out the second half 
strong. 

Rachel Smits scored her 
second goal of the season on 
an assist by Nicole Scott 
shortly after the start of the 
half. 

Clarion put the game 
away late in the second half 



when Devina Boring scored 
an unassisted goal at the 87 
minute mark to give the 
Golden Eagles their first 
victory in two weeks. 

After the game against 
St. Vincent on Sunday the 
Golden Eagles currently sit 
with an overall record of 5-6 
and are 1-4 in the PSAC 
West. 

The Golden Eagles have 
a goal scored average of 1.09 
with a shot percentage of 
.110, and have scored a total 
of 34 goals this season. 

Up next for the Golden 
Eagles is a rematch with the 
Kutztown Bears on 
Wednesday Sept. 27. 
Kutztown handed the 
Golden Eagles their first 
loss of the season on August 
30, 2-1. 

The Golden Eagles have 
eight more games to be 
played, five of which are 
PSAC West games, the next 
being Sept. 30 in Lock 
Haven 



FOOD 

for body and soul 
every Sunday 

10:15 a.m. Brunch discussion 
11:00 a.m. Worship 

tradition + freedom 
true community 

Clarion Free Methodist Church 
Comer of South St & Third Ave. 

www.clarionfmc.org 



week's Hal Hansen 
Invitational, but was beaten 
out in the playoff by senior 
teammate Justin Scott. 

This week Moose's 141 
was good enough for a third 
place finish in the individ- 
ual tournament and a spot 
on the all tournament team. 
Junior Preston Mullens fin- 
ished second out of the 
Golden Eagle golfers with a 
two-day total of 149. 

Scott, who last week 
won the individual title at 
the Hal Hansen and also 
tied the record for the lowest 
round in school history at 
five under par, finished one 
shot behind Mullens with a 
150. 

Senior Tom Will and 
sophomore Nick Brucker 
both finished with scores of 
153 in the two-day event. 

The Golden Eagles will 
travel to Westminster on 
Monday Oct. 2 to participate 
in the Westminster 
Invitational. 

The match at 

Westminster is one of the 
three remaining events for 
Clarion before they travel to 
Hershey to defend their 
PSAC Championship 

October 14 and 15. 

The Golden Eagles won 
the PSAC last year by four 
strokes and Moose won the 
individual event. 




3msn : *«i^ of 

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CMirlon to ticwt ^^y 

nmk In mm w^ 




r.il SfplSJilttf 

.; 'til! hi-. fh{ 

Kickoif «i 
Clarioij a Memoris 

>nmc 
heard 

Eaglfc KiutbftU nelwo! 
which includes WCCR 
FM 92.7 and WKQW 
FM, 9i-'- H, as weU a» 01 
the mterTiet at 

HedsoRtimedia.com with 
££&« KaUnowski caUisg 
the play by pky and Fat 
Kahle providing th« 
aoalysis. 

Clarion first y«ai 
head coach Jay Fcwtoi 
will have the Golde; 
.Eagles prepared to line 
up againet the Rock and 
19th year bead coach Dr. 
George Mihalik on 
Saturday night. Since 
Foster spent the previou«i 
18 years at Slij^ry Rock 
Isaraing under Mihalik, 
the PSAC-West opener 
has additional interest )n 
both cof»'?bing camps. 



: fof/tst to faoe Silpp«?y 
Rock for fimttim6 

Ciacfon has startti 
^the 20(' .00 with aw 
0-4 record. The 2(K)6 sea 
Bon opened at Tiffin with 
^the Br- ■'^'■'>- rsoatin 
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One copy free 




CUP receives grant exceeding $2 miilion 

See "News" page 2 



Foorman's Carmel Apple 

S#« "Features" page 5 




THECL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 




NCALL 



Volume 93 Issue 4 



October 5, 2006 




I I 



Wwhington Pwt Hmns Servtpa 

^idco City allows 

Mependent 

wmiidat^torun 

MEXl' - The 

[Mexican supreme Court 
voted Tuesday to allow 
independent candidates 
to irun for office, overturn- 
ing a 60-yearold inter- 
pretation of the constitu- 
tion that wquired candi- 
dates to belong to regi*- 
tered poUtical parties. 

feThe 6-5 vote sided 
h the Yucatan state 
islature, which m May 
^d to allow independ* 
to run for state and 
local oflSces. The law was 
challenged before the 
Supreme Court by the 
Alliance for Yucatan, a 
state poHtical party. 

E. Coil sickens 5 mor@ 
people nationwide 

LOS ANGELOS 
Nationwide E. coli out- 
break linked to 
California's coastal coun- 
ties sickened five more 
people, bringing the num- 
ber of cases to 192 in 26 
a^tea, federal officials 
said Tuesday. 

Meanwhile, health 
investigators found that 
fecal samples from cows 
.in pastutres "right next 
door" to two central 
California spinach fields 
tested positive for E. coli 
01o7:H7, said a state 
health official. 

"The real key here ia 
to see if the strain of 
G157:H7 matches up with 
the outbreak strain," said 
Kevin Reilly, deputy 
diifector for prevention 
services at the 

Department of Health 
Services, Tests to deter- 
mine a genetic match will 
take about two more 
days, Beilly said. 

If the strains mateh. 
investigators would need 
to figure out how the bac- 
teria from the cow feces 
spread to the nearby 
spinach fields 

Possibilities include irri- 
gation water, rainfall 
rUinoff, roaming cattle- 
and wild animals. 

Discovery of 16 pc^t- 
bie new planets Indi- 
cates ex^ence of bll 
Ikmsmcre 

WASHINGTON - NASA 
■cientists using the 
Hubble space telescope 
have ^-.r.^.^red what 
the re 16 new 

p in the Milky 
Way, leading them to con- 
clude there are probably 
billions of planets spread 

ughout the galaxy. 

Over the past 15 
vrrtig, other astronomere 
have identified more than 

planets outside our 
it the new 



CUP scientific study pubiislied in journai 



Shakira O'Neil 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s__s)oiieil®clarion.edu 

CMRION, Oct. 3 - Clarion 
University's Peirce Science 
Center is home to a ground 
breaking experiment. 

Professor Dr. Joshua M. 
Pearce, assistant professor 
of physics and the coordina- 
tor of nanotechnology and 
sustainability, teamed up 
with one of his students, 
fJason Hanlon, and conduct- 
ed research about tire pres- 
sures and the correlation to 
fuel efficiency and accident 
reduction. The study's offi- 
cial name is "Energy 
Conservation from Systemic 
Tire Pressure Regulation." 

The story consisted of 
random cars being tested for 
tire pressure at a Wal-Mart 
in Pennsylvania. 



Individual tire pres- 
sures were recorded along 
with the make, model and 
year of the vehicle. "Every 
vehicle is represented," said 
Pearce. 

The pressures were then 
recorded and compared with 
the tire pressures that the 
manufacturer's recommend- 
ed. 

"Originally this study 
addressed the gasoline sav- 
ings from driving on proper- 
ly inflated tires that avoid 
wasted energy due to 
increased rolling resist- 
ance," said Pearce. 
"However, driving on under 
inflated tires is also more 
dangerous. Under-inflated 
tires can increase the stop- 
ping distance of a vehicle, 
particularly on wet slippery 
surfaces, and lead to tire 
failures or blowouts." 




Mike Cauvel/TTie Clarion Cill 

Clarion County Wal-Mart- Tire pressures were tested at Wal- 
marts in Pennsylvania. 



The results from the 
comparison of the tire pres- 
sures were that most vehi- 
cles were driving on under- 
inflated tires. This will 
inevitably hurt fuel efficien- 



cy 

Other results showed 
that if U.S service stations 
offer complementary tire 
pressure checks with the oil 
changes there would be 



drastically positive effects. 
These effects include 
increased safety by decreas- 
ing automobile crashes 
which would save more than 
100 lives a year and prevent 
over 8.000 injuries. This 
would also counter effect 
health care by preventing 
insurance payouts from 
these injuries. 

Another positive effect 
would be the consumption of 
petroleum. This would be 
reduced by over a billion 
gallons a year which would 
then provide $4 billion in 
economic savings for 
American consumers and 
reduce green house gas 
emissions by 13.5 million 
tons. 

See "ENERGY" 
continued on page 2. 



State sclioois impact surrounding areas 



Krystal Finkbeiner 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_knfinkbein@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 3 - State 
schools provide a strong eco- 
nomic impact to their sur- 
rounding communities and 
contribute a lot of attention 
to the area while school is in 
session. 

According to assistant 
vice president of university 
relations, Ron Wilshire, the 
financial impact of the uni- 
versities on the community 
can best be measured in 
terms of economic impact. 
This is not a cash contribu- 
tion, but a detailed meas- 
urement of the amount of 
money spent by the 
University, its students and 
employees. 

Clarion is on top when 
it comes to creating an eco- 
nomic impact. The biggest 
economic impact Wilshire 
brings up is A.L.F., "Autumn 
Leaf Festival brings quite a 
bit of 'economic impact' to 
the area and Clarion 

Relay for 
Life hold 
auditions 
for musical 

Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 3 - Clarion 
University is holding audi- 
tions for the musical, "CUPs 
Got Broadway Talent," a 
fundraiser for Relay for Life, 
on Oct. 10 at 6 p.m. in 248 
Gemmell. 

The theme for the 2007 
Relay for Life, an event that 
raises money for the 
American Cancer Society, is 
"Perform Miracles-Help 
Find a CURE." 

Clarion's related 

fundraiser, "CUPs Got 
Broadway Talent" will be 
performed on Oct. 29 at 7 
p.m. in Hart Chapel. 

Admission will be $3 per 
person and the audience 
will be able to vote for their 
favorite performer, which 
will be determined by dona- 
tions in the "bucket" of each 
individual performer. 

See "RELAY" 
continued on page 2. 



University plays a ittajor 
role in this. In addition to 
our students and employees, 
many alumni returning for 
Homecoming is part of 
A.L.F." 

"Economic impact gen- 
erated by the University is 



(PASSHE), the PASSHE has 
reported that Universities 
contribute $4.47 billion to 
the Pennsylvania economy 
and are responsible for more 
than 51,000 jobs. 

Additionally, for every 
one dollar invested in 




Shasta Kurtz/r/ie Clarion Call 

(^P - State colleges have significant impact on communities. 



reinvested in the communi- 
ty through additional 
employees and those people 
buy additional goods and 
services. In some ways, eco- 
nomic impact is a gift that 
does keep on giving," said 
Wilshire. 

According to Kenn 
Marshall, spokesperson of 
The Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher Education 



PASSHE, the Universities 
have returned more than 
$10 dollars in economic 
impact. Universities also 
bring in 39,000 jobs 
statewide. 

Contractors are employed 
by building all structures on 
campus. In the campus com- 
munities there are hun- 
dreds of small businesses 
that operate and feed off of 



the campus. Students also 
buy food, fuel and other 
goods from the community. 
"PASSHE Universities are 
key players in 

Pennsylvania's economy," 
said Kenneth M. Jarin, 
chairman of PASSHE's 
Board of Governors. 

Governor Edward G. 
Rendell has commented on 
PASSHE's contributions to 
the Commonwealth. 

He said, "It is clear that 
Pennsylvania's 14 state uni- 
versities have an impact far 
beyond the boundaries of 
the campus communities." 

According to Marshall, 
PASSHE Universities are 
actively involved in both 
local and regional economic 
development efforts. 

Universities offer a more 
developed workforce and 
training opportunities. 

There are 14 state- 
owned universities includ- 
ing Bioomsburg, California, 
Cheyney. Clarion, East 
Stroudsburg, Edinboro, 
Indiana, Kutztown, Lock 
Haven, Mansfield, 

Millersville, Shippensburg, 
Slippery Rock and West 
Chester. Four of these 
Universities, Clarion, 

Indiana, Kutztown and Lock 
Haven operate Small 



Business Development 
Centers. Five of the 
Universities, Cheney, 

Clarion, East Stroudsburg, 
Indiana and Millersville 
operate business incubators 
that provide valuable 
research and development 
assistance that helps the 
growth of new businesses. 

According to the 
Executive Summary on the 
Economic Impact of the 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education on the 
Commonwealth of 

Pennsylvania, the average 
economic impact of each 
PASSHE university upon 
Commonwealth was about 
$313 million. The two uni- 
versities with the largest 
total impact upon the state 
are Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania which brings 
in $564 million and West 
Chester University of 
Pennsylvania which brings 
in $509 million. The total 
economic impact of PASSHE 
spending upon the 
Commonwealth was $4.47 
billion. 

According to Marshall, 
the PASSHE's has actually 
added $42 million to the 
Commonwealth's general 
fund in the last form of sales 
and income taxes. 



CUP professor, Yenerall is 
published in academic textbooic 



Kelly Pennisi 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kpennisi@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Oct. 4 - Dr. 
Kevan Yenerall, associate 
professor of political sci- 
ence at Clarion 
University, has recently 
been published in the 
book "Executing the 
Constitution: Putting the 
President Back into the 
Constitution." 

Yenerall's chapter is 
titled "Executing the 
Rhetorical Presidency: 
William Jefferson Clinton, 
George W. Bush, and the 
Contemporary Face of 
Presidential Power." 

The book is published 
by SUNY Press and edited 
by Christopher S. Kelley 
and is considered an aca- 



demic textbook. 

Rhetorical presidency 
is "when presidents take 
their message(s) directly 
to their people," Yernerall 
said. "Examples are presi- 
dential speeches, rallies, 
presidential conference, 
basically anything that 
involves the presidents 
talking to their people. It's 
also going public. 
Rhetorical presidency 
began with Theodoore 
Roosevelt." 

Yenerall wrote a chap- 
ter because he said, "that 
presidents are 'going pub- 
lic' more than ever and as 
citizens and scholars, it is 
important for us to under- 
stand and appreciate what 
they are saying, why they 
are saying it and whether 
or not their rhetorical use 



of is reasonably related to 
the constitutional perime- 
ters of the American pres- 
idency." 

Yenerall said, "In 
many ways modern presi- 
dents, including our cur- 
rent president George W. 
Bush, tend to stretch the 
Constitution for immedi- 
ate political purposes and 
often execute powers and 
take actions which are not 
directly tied to the offices 
constitution foundation." 

Yenerall wants stu- 
dents to be more aware of 
what is happening in 
regards to the rhetoric 
presidency. 

Yenerall's concerns 
about the issues dealing 
with how presidents use 
their rhetorical presidency 
is the focus of the chapter. 



Yenerall said, "What the 
book and my chapter seek 
to do is to put the constitu- 
tion back into the publics' 
and academics' under- 
standing of the American 
presidency and my exami- 
nation of certain aspects 
of Clinton and Bush's 
rhetoric illustrates howev- 
er that our presidents can 
be very eloquent in defin- 
ing essential issues and 
their rhetorical presiden- 
cies with a firm grasp of 
the offices constitutional 
design." 

In the future Yenerall 
hopes to work on projects 
involving philosophy and 
pop culture and to exam- 
ine Clinton's rhetorical 
presidency. 



Page 12 



THE CLARION CALL 



September 28. 2006 



S/irts 



Tiiiliiy: Fiiiilliiillpliivx#IOI{lo(iiiislinr)( Tcniiu in iiiliiin al I'pnnSliilr 



Cross Country teams face tough 
competition at Penn State Invite 



course, earning her 19th 
place among some of the 
best runners in the country. 

.Junior Krin Richard fol- 
lowed in .S8th place with a 
time of 22:56:40. Last year 
at I'SAC's. Wheatley "and 
Richard placi'd 2()th and 
21st and are looking to 
improve this year after an 
incredible track season last 
year in which both runners 
earned top honors in the 
PS AC. 

Other top 200 finishers 
at the Penn State invita- 
tional for the Clolden Eagles 
were Autumn Shaffer, 
Caitlin Palko. Kate Ehren- 
sberger and Suzanne 
Schwerer. Overall the 
women's team placed 16th 
among 25 squads competing 
in the invitational. 

The men's team was 
equally successful in their 
running. Junior Chris Clark 
lead the Eagles with a time 
of 26^56:95 which earned 
him a 29th place finish. 
Chris ran the race 2 '2 min- 
utes faster than he did his 
freshmen year, as well as 
finishing 3rd among all 
PSAC runners at the PSU 
invitational. Last vear 



Katelyn Monrean 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kjmonrean@clarion.e(Ju 

CLARION. Sept. 25 - In 
July. Jayson Re.sch had no 
idea that he would be in the 
midst of his first year head 
coaching Clarion Unive- 
rsity's Cross Country team. 
Last year he was a volun- 
teer coach for the cross 
country and track teams but 
due to the resignation of for- 
mer head coach. Daniel 
Caulfield. Coach Resch 
returned to assume the 
head coach position. 

On Saturday Sept. 2'A 
both the women's and men's 
cross country teams trav- 
eled to State College to take 
on teams from across the 
country at the Penn State 
Spiked Shoe Invitational. 

These teams included 
many Division I teams such 
as Penn State and Syracuse 
as well as many PSAC 
rivals. 

The women's team was 
lead by Senior Tasha 
Wheatley who made 
Saturday the best meet of 
her cross county career. She 
ran a personal best time of 
22:29:10 in the 6000 meter Clark, who finished 10th in 

Golden Eagles football puts up a fight 
against 10th ranked Bloomsburg 



the PSAC. is looking to 
place in the top runners this 
year at the PSAC champi- 
onships on Oct. 28 at 
FMoomsburg. 

Other Clarion runners 
finishing in the top 200 were 
liill Herrmann, Sean 
McFarland. Josh Foulds. 
Travis Cyphert. Adam 
Sencek, and Jason South. 

Coach Jayson Resch is 
pleased with his team, espe- 
cially with some difficulties 
the team had the week prior 
to the meet with overcoming 
injuries and illness within 
the team. Resch said there 
was "big improvement in 
athletes" and "the team per- 
formed well overall but the 
meet helped to re-establish 
team goals." 

The Golden Eagles were 
defeated by a few teams 
that they had beaten earlier 
in the season, now they 
have focused the victories 
and defeats of the invita- 
tional into an attainable 
goal for the next meet at 
Penn State on Oct. 7th. The 
Golden Eagles will be com- 
peting in the United Way 5K 
on Sept. 30. 



Chris Parks 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_csparks@clarion.eclu 

BLOOMSBURG. Sept. 2:^ - 
The Golden Eagles played 
right with Bloomsburg. the 
number 10 ranked team in 
Division II. for the first 30 
minutes of football. 
Problem is there are 60 min- 
utes in the game and a few 
miscues in the 2nd half 
downed the Golden Eagles 
for the fourth straight game 
by the score of 24-10. 

Clarion jumped out to a 
quick 10-0 lead thanks to a 
17 yard touchdown catch by 
tight end Matt Foradora 
from Mark Rupert and a 
Kyle Snoke 35 yard field 
goal. Snoke on the season is 
now three for four in field 
attempts and has it hit 7 
extra points: head coach Jay 
Foster has been pleased 
with his kicker's turnaround 
from last season. 

"Kyle has done all we've 
asked. He needs a little 
more height on his field 
goals but is doing well." 

Bloomsburg struck back 
just in time to end the first 
half on a Greg Masters 25 
yard touchdown pass from 
quarterback Dan Latorre to 
make it a 10-7 halftime 
score. In the second half, 
the 10th ranked Hu.skies got 
their act together and 
scored the next 1 7 points. 

Joe Koening hit a 25 
yard field goal to tie it up. 
Then running back for 
Bloomsburg. Jamar 

Brittingham scored on twci 
touchdown runs. He fin- 
ished with 160 rushing 
yards on 23 carries and had 
two catches for 4 yards. 

Greg Masters paced the 
Husky receivers with 63 
yards and a touchdown. 
Defensively they came out 
in the second half and forced 
some key turnovers. 
Headlining the defense was 
Matt Smith with 9 tackles 
and Jesse Cooper with 7. 

The duo of Herb Cavra- 
way and Pierre Odom com- 
bined on 7 catches for 104 
vards. Carrawav has been 



battling some injuries this 
season, but Coach Foster is 
happy with his production, 
but still cautious with his 
knee. 

"Herb is slowly getting 
his knee back into playing 
shape. He still has a way to 
go before he is back 100 per- 
cent, but he is definitely 
starting to show some good 
signs." 

Defensively, the Golden 
Eagles played much better 
than the West Chester game 
and quarterback turned 



to hit now." 

Other studs on defense 
included Dwoan Woodard 
who had 5 tackles and 
Kevin Rigby with 3 stops 
and an interception. 

Clarion returns home 
this coming weekend for 
their second home and 1st 
PSAC-West game against 
rival Slippery Rock at 
Memorial Stadium with 
kickoff set at 6pm. 

F'oster will coach 
against his former team for 
the first time on Saturday. 




Mike Cauvel/rfie Clarion Call 
Looking for a win - Kicker Kyle Snoke (15) and wide receiver 
Clint Brown (7) stand on the sideline during the Golden Eagles 
home opener. This Saturday they play Slippery Rock in Clarion. 



defensive back Erik Yonish. 
picked up an interception. 
Coach Foster continues to 
like this move from offense 
to defense. 

"Yonish continues to get 
better every week. He start- 
ed the season looking like a 
quarterback playing defen- 
sive back, but he is starting 



Foster was a defensive coor- 
dinator and assistant coach 
for 18 seasons at Slippery 
Rock before being named 
head coach at Clarion. 

The following weekend 
Clarion will be hosting 
Cheyney University during 
homecoming weekend. 



Golf team wins 
Wheeling Jesuit Invite 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s,ekbowser@clarion.edu 

CLARION. Sept. 27 - On 
Sept. 26 and 27 the Clarion 
University Golf team trav- 
eled to Moundsville Country 
Club to participate in the 
Wheeling Jesuit Invitati- 
onal. 

The Golden Eagles were 
victorious for the second 
consecutive week, scoring a 
nine shot victory over 
California University. 

The Golden Eagles shot 
the low round each day of 
the tournament with a 297 
on the first day and a second 
day 291 for a 588. 
California shot a 597 to fin- 
ish in second just two shots 
ahead of third place finisher 
the University of Charle- 
ston. 

"It was a good win for 
us, we had the low round for 
both days," Coach Al Lefevre 
said. "That's what we are 
looking for this season is 
consistency." 

The low man for the 
Golden Eagles was junior 
Justin Moose. Moose shot a 
74 on the first day but came 
back to shot a 67, the second 
lowest round of the entire 
tournament, on Tuesday. 

Moose finished in a four- 
way tie for first place at last 



week's Hal Hansen 
Invitational, but was beaten 
out in the playoff by senior 
teammate Justin Scott. 

This week Moo.se's 141 
was good enough for a third 
place finish in the individ 
ual tournament and a spot 
on the all tournament team. 
Junior Preston Mullens fin- 
ished second out of the 
Golden Eagle golfers with a 
two-day total of 149. 

Scott, who last week 
won the individual title at 
the Hal Hansen and also 
tied the record for the lowest 
round in school history at 
five under par, finished one 
shot behind Mullens with a 
150. 

Senior Tom Will and 
sophomore Nick Brucker 
both finished with scores of 
153 in the two-day event. 

The Golden Eagles will 
travel to Westminster on 
Monday Oct. 2 to participate 
in the Westminster 
Invitational. 

The match at 

Westminster is one of the 
three remaining events for 
Clarion before they travel to 
Hershey to defend their 
PSAC Championship 

October 14 and 15. 

The Golden Eagles won 
the PSAC last year by four 
strokes and Moose won the 
individual event. 



Soccer team snaps four 
game losing streak 



Rob Rankin 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rwrankin@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 26 - After 
starting out conference play 
with a 3-2 victory over Lock 
Haven the Golden Eagles 
dropped their next four con- 
ference games. Clarion had 
lost five of its last seven 
games overall. 

The Golden Eagles 
snapped their losing streak 
with a 2-0 shutout over St. 
Vincent College on Sunday. 

After playing to a score- 
less tie at the end of the first 
half the Golden Eagles 
started out the second half 
strong. 

Rachel Smits scored her 
second goal of the season on 
an assist by Nicole Scott 
shortly after the start of the 
half. ' 

Clarion put the game 
awav late in the second half 



when Devina Boring scored 
an unassisted goal at the 87 
minute mark to give the 
Golden Eagles their first 
victory in two weeks. 

After the game against 
St. Vincent on Sunday the 
Golden Eagles currently sit 
with an overall record of 5-6 
and are 1-4 in the PSAC 
West. 

The Golden Eagles have 
a goal scored average of 1.09 
with a shot percentage of 
.110, and have scored a total 
of 34 goals this season. 

Up next for the Golden 
Eagles is a rematch with the 
Kutztown Bears on 
Wednesday Sept. 27. 
Kutztown handed the 
Golden Eagles their first 
loss of the season on August 
30, 2-1. 

The Golden Eagles have 
eight more games to be 
played, five of which are 
PSAC West games, the next 
being Sept. 30 in Lock 
Haven 



FOOD 

for body and soul 
every Sunday 

10:15 a.m. Brunch discussion 
11;00 a.m. Worship 

tradition ^ freedom 
true community 

Clarion Fret Methodist Church 
Comer of South St & Third Ave. 

www.clarionfmc.org 



Sports Brieft 






Sports briefs courtesy c^ 
Sports InformatioT) 



Clarton to host Slippery 
Rock in PSAC West 
opener 

This Saturday it will 
be teacher versus pupil, 
as Slippery Rock travels 
to Clarion on September 
30 for what will be the 
PSAC-West opener for 
both teams. Kicko£f at 
Clarion's Memorial 

Stadium is set for 6 p.m. 

The game can be 
heard on the Golden 
Eagle football network 
which includes WCCR- 
FM 92.7 and WKQW- 
FM, 96.3, as well as on 
the internet at 

Redzonemedia.com with 
Mike Kalinowski calling 
the play by play and Pat 
Kahle providing the 
analysis. 

Clarion first year 
head coach Jay Foster, 
will have the Golden 
Eagles prepared to line 
up against the Rock and 
19th year head coach Dr. 
George Mihalik on 
Saturday night. Since 
Foster spent the previous 
18 years at SUppery Rock 
learning under Mihalik, 
the PSAC-West opener 
has additional interest in 
both coaching camps. 



Foster to face Slippery 
Rock for first time 

Clarion has started 
the 2006 season with an 
0-4 record. The 2006 sea- 
son opened at Tiffin with 
the Dragons posting a 
21*13 win. Game two, 
also on the road, saw 
Clarion drop a 27-10 
decision at Kutztown. 

After losing to West 
Chester 49-21 two weeks 
ago, the Eagles traveled 
to #10 ranked 

Bloomsburg and threw a 
scare into the Huskies 
before bowing in the 
fourth quarter 24-10. 

Foster is certainly no 
stranger to the PSC and 
NCAA Division II foot- 
ball. Foster coached for 
18 seasons at Slippery 
Rock before coming to 
Clarion, and was the 
defensive coordinator at 
the Rock for 17 of those 
years. 

While at Slippery 
Rock Foster helped those 
teams compile a 120-73-4 
record, make 3 NCAA D- 
II Playoff appearances 
and earn four straight 
PSAC-West crowns 

(1997-2000). 

A native of Berwick, 
Maine, Foster is a 1985 
graduate of Plymouth 
State and coached two 
seasons under Danny 
Hale at West Chester 
before going to SRU. 




"Black Dahlia" falls In viewers eyes 

See "Entertainment" page 6 




CUP receives grant exceeding $2 million 

See "News" page 2 



Poorman's Carmei Apple 

See "Features" page 5 







's^- 



One copy free 



THE CLARIOI CALL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 



Volume 93 Issue 4 



Octobers, 2006 



f^ 



t^atiorjol^' 



Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

Mexico City allows 
Independent 
candidates to run 

MEXICO CITY - The 
Mexican Supreme Court 
voted Tuesday to allow 
independent candidates 
to run for office, overturn- 
ing a 60-year-old inter- 
pretation of the constitu- 
tion that required candi- 
dates to belong to regis- 
tered political parties. 

The 6-6 vote sided 
with the Yucatan state 
legislature, which in May 
voted to allow independ- 
ents to run for state and 
local offices. The law was 
challenged before the 
Supreme Court by the 
Alliance for Yucatan, a 
state political party. 

E. Coil sicl(ens 5 more 
people nationwide 

LOS ANGELOS 
Nationwide E. coli out- 
break linked to 
California's coastal coun- 
ties sickened five more 
people, bringing the num- 
ber of cases to 192 in 26 
states, federal officials 
said Tuesday. 

Meanwhile, health 
investigators found that 
fecal samples from cows 
in pastures "right next 
door" to two central 
California spinach fields 
tested positive for E. coli 
0157:H7, said a state 
health official. 

'The real key here is 
to see if the strain of 
0157:H7 matches up with 
the outbreak strain," said 
Kevin Reilly, deputy 
director for prevention 
services at the 

Department of Health 
Services. Tests to deter- 
mine a genetic match will 
take about two more 
days, Reilly said. 

If the strains match, 
investigators would need 
to figure out how the bac- 
teria from the cow feces 
spread to the nearby 
spinach fields. 

Possibilities include irri- 
gation water, rainfall 
runoff, roaming cattle 
and wild animals. 

Discovery of 16 possi- 
ble new planets indi- 
cates existence of bil- 
lions more 

WASHINGTON - xNASA 
scientists using the 
Hubble space telescope 
have discovered what 
they believe are 16 new 
planets deep in the Milky 
Way, leading them to con- 
clude there are probably 
billions of planets spread 
throughout the galaxy. 

Over the past 15 
years, other astronomers 
have identified more than 
200 planets outside our 
solar system, but the new 
ones identified by the 
Hubble are at least 10 
times farther away from 
Earth. 



CUP scientific study published In journal 



Stiakira O'Neil 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s.sjoneiiSclanon.eclu 

CLARION, Oct. 3 - Clarion 
University's Peirce Science 
( 'enter is home to a ground 
breaking experiment. 

Professor Dr. floshua M. 
I't'iuce, assi.'^tant professor 
ol physics and the coordina- 
tor of nanotechnology and 
sustainability, teamed up 
with one of his students, 
-lason Hanlon. and conduct- 
ed research about tire pres- 
sures and the correlation to 
fuel efficiency and accident 
(■eduction. The study's offi- 
cial name is "Knergy 
Conservation from Systemic 
Tire Pressure Regulation." 

The story consisted of 
random cars being tested for 
tire pressure at a Wal-Mart 
in Pennsylvania. 



Individual tire pres- 
sures were recorded along 
with the make, model and 
year of the vehicle. "Every 
vehicle is represented," said 
Pearce. 

The pressures were then 
recorded and compared with 
the tire pressures that the 
manufacturer's recommend- 
ed. 

■'Originally this study 
addressed the gasoline sav- 
ings from driving on proper- 
ly inflated tires that avoid 
wasted energy due to 
increased rolling resist- 
ance." said Pearce. 
"However, driving on under 
inflated tires is also more 
dangerous. Under-inflated 
tires can increase the stop- 
ping distance of a vehicle, 
particularly on wet slippery 
surfaces, and lead to tire 
failures or blowouts." 




Mike Cauvel/rfte Clarion Call 
Clarion County Wal Mart -Tire pressures were tested at Wal- 
marts in Pennsylvania. 

The results from the 
comparison of the tire pres- 
sures were that most vehi- 
cles were driving on under- 
inflated tires. This will 
inevitablv hurt fuel efficien- 



cy 

Other results showed 
that if U.S service stations 
offer complementary tire 
pressure checks with the oil 
changes there would be 



drastically positive effects. 
These effects include 
increased safety by decreas- 
ing automobile crashes 
which would save more than 
100 lives a year and prevent 
over 8.000 injuries. This 
would also counter effect 
health care by preventing 
insurance payouts from 
these injuries. 

Another positive effect 
would be the consumption of 
petroleum. This would be 
reduced by over a billion 
gallons a year which would 
then provide $1 billion in 
economic savings for 
.American consumers and 
reduce green house gas 
emissions by 13.5 million 
tons. 

See "ENERGY" 
continued on page 2. 



State schools Impact surrounding areas 



Krystal Finkbeiner 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_knfinkbein@clarion,edu 

CLAKION. Oct. 3 - State 
schools provide a strong eco- 
nomic impact to their sur 
I'ounding communities and 
contribute a lot of attention 
to the area while school is in 
session. 

According to assistant 
vice president of university 
relations, Ron Wilshire. the 
financial impact of the uni- 
versities on the community 
can best be measured in 
terms of economic impact. 
This is not a cash contribu- 
tion, but a detailed meas- 
urement of the amount of 
money spent by the 
University, its students and 
employees. 

Clarion is on top when 
it comes to creating an eco- 
nomic impact. The biggest 
economic impact Wilshire 
brings up is A.L.F., "Autumn 
Leaf Festival brings quite a 
bit of "economic impact' to 
the area and Clarion 

Relay for 
Life hold 
auditions 
for musical 

Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 

CLARION. Oct. 3 - Clarion 
University is holding audi- 
tions for the musical, "CUPs 
Got Broadway Talent," a 
fundraiser for Relay for Life, 
on Oct. 10 at 6 p.m. in 248 
Cemmell. 

The theme for the 2007 
Relay for Life, an event that 
raises money for the 
American Cancer Society, is 
"Perform Miracles-Help 
Find a CURE." 

Clarion's related 

fundraiser. "CUPs Got 
Broadway Talent" will be 
performed on Oct. 29 at 7 
p.m. in Hart Chapel. 

Admission will be $3 per 
person and the audience 
will be able to vote for their 
favorite performer, which 
will be determined by dona- 
tions in the "bucket" of each 
individual performer. 

See "RELAY" 
continued on page 2. 



University plays a major 
role in this. In addition to 
our students and employees, 
many alumni returning for 
Homecoming is part of 
A.L.F." 

"Economic impact gen- 
erated by the University is 



(PASSHE), the PASSHE has 
reported that Universities 
contribute $4.47 billion to 
the Pennsylvania economy 
and are responsible for more 
than 51.000 jobs. 

Additionally, for every 
one dollar invested in 




Shasta Kurtz/T/ie Clarion Call 

CUP - State colleges have significant impact on communities. 



reinvested in the communi- 
ty through additional 
employees and those people 
buy additional goods and 
services. In some ways, eco- 
nomic impact is a gift that 
does keep on giving," said 
Wilshire. 

According to Kenn 
Marshall, spokesperson of 
The Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher Education 



PASSHE, the Universities 
have returned more than 
$10 dollars in economic 
impact. Universities also 
bring in 39,000 jobs 
statewide. 

Contractors are employed 
by building all structures on 
campus. In the campus com- 
munities there are hun- 
dreds of small businesses 
that operate and feed off of 



the campus. Students also 
buy food, fuel and other 
goods from the community. 
"PASSHP] Universities are 
key players in 

Pennsylvania's economy," 
said Kenneth M. Jarin. 
chairman of PASSHK's 
Board of Governors. 

Governor F]dward C. 
Rendell has commented on 
PASSHE's contributions to 
the Commonwealth. 

He said, "It is clear that 
Pennsylvania's 14 state uni- 
versities have an impact far 
beyond the boundaries of 
the campus communities." 

According to Marshall. 
PASSHE Universities are 
actively involved in both 
local and regional economic 
development efforts. 

Universities offer a more 
developed workforce and 
training opportunities. 

There are 14 state- 
owned universities includ- 
ing Bloomsburg. California. 
Cheyney, Clarion. p]ast 
Stroudsburg. Edinboro. 
Indiana, Kutztown. Lock 
Haven. Mansfield, 

Millersville, Shippensburg. 
Slippery Rock and West 
Chester. Four of these 
Universities, Clarion, 

Indiana, Kutztown and Lock 
Haven operate Small 



Business Development 

Centers. Five of the 
Universities, Cheney, 

Clarion, Elast Stroudsburg, 
Indiana and Millersville 
operate business incubators 
that provide valuable 
research and development 
assistance that helps the 
growth of new busines.ses. 

According to the 
Executive Summary on the 
Economic Impact of the 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education on the 
Commonwealth of 

Pennsylvania, the average 
economic impact of each 
PASSHE university upon 
Commonwealth was about 
$313 million. The two uni- 
versities with the largest 
total impact upon the state 
are Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania which brings 
in $.5{) I million and West 
Chester University of 
Pennsylvania which brings 
in $509 million. The total 
economic impact of PASSHE 
spending upon the 

Commonwealth was $4.47 
billion. 

According to Marshall, 
the PASSHE's has actually 
added $42 million to the 
Commonwealth's general 
fund in the last form of sales 
and income taxes. 



CUP professor, Yenerali is 
published in academic textboolc 



Kelly Pennisi 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kpennisi@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Oct. 4 - Dr. 

Kevan Yenerali, associate 
professor of political sci- 
ence at Clarion 
University, has recently 
been published in the 
book "Executing the 
Constitution: Putting the 
President Back into the 
Constitution." 

Yenerall's chapter is 
titled "Executing the 
Rhetorical Presidency: 
William Jefferson Clinton, 
George W. Bush, and the 
Contemporary Face of 
Presidential Power" 

The book is published 
by SUNY Press and edited 
by Christopher S. Kelley 
and is considered an aca- 



demic textbook. 

Rhetorical presidency 
is "when presidents take 
their message(s) directly 
to their people." Yernerall 
said. "Examples are presi- 
dential speeches, rallies, 
presidential conference, 
basically anything that 
involves the presidents 
talking to their people. It's 
also going public. 
Rhetorical presidency 
began with Theodoore 
Roosevelt." 

Yenerali wrote a chap- 
ter because he said, "that 
presidents are 'going pub- 
lic' more than ever and as 
citizens and scholars, it is 
important for us to under- 
stand and appreciate what 
they are saying, why they 
are saying it and whether 
or not their rhetorical use 



of is reasonably related to 
the constitutional perime- 
ters of the American pres- 
idency." 

Yenerali said, "In 
many ways modern presi- 
dents, including our cur- 
rent president George W. 
Bush, tend to stretch the 
Constitution for immedi- 
ate political purposes and 
often execute powers and 
take actions which are not 
directly tied to the offices 
constitution foundation." 

Yenerali wants stu- 
dents to be more aware of 
what is happening in 
regards to the rhetoric 
presidency. 

Yenerall's concerns 
about the issues dealing 
with how presidents use 
their rhetorical presidency 
is the focus of the chapter. 



Yenerali said, "What the 
book and my chapter seek 
to do is to put the constitu- 
tion back into the publics' 
and academics' under- 
standing of the American 
presidency and my exami- 
nation of certain aspects 
of Clinton and Bush's 
rhetoric illustrates howev- 
er that our presidents can 
be very eloquent in defin- 
ing essential issues and 
their rhetorical presiden- 
cies with a firm grasp of 
the offices constitutional 
design." 

In the future Yenerali 
hopes to work on projects 
involving philosophy and 
pop culture and to exam- 
ine Clinton's rhetorical 
presidency. 



Page 2 



im CLARION CALL 



October 5. 2006 



Im 



CUP received performance funding 
grant exceeding $2 miiiion 



Adam Mohney 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ajmohney®clarion.edu 

CIARION, Oct. 3 - Clarion 
University recently received 
a performance funding 
grant from the 

Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education 
(PASSHE) on Sept. 18, 2006 
which was based on a series 
of indicators set by the State 
System. 

The grant, which totaled 
$2,096,986, was the largest 
ever received by CUP since 
the performance funding 
program began in July 2000, 
according to University 
Relations. The amount of 
money allotted by the 
PASSHE is determined by 
the university's success in 
meeting a series of eight 
indicators and then adjust- 
ed for the size of the school, 
according to the PASSHE 
Web site (www.passhe.edu). 

The indicators include 
student retention and grad- 
uation rates, degrees award- 
ed, instructional cost per 
student and the percentage 
of full-time tenured and 
tenure-track instructional 
faculty with terminal 
degrees in their discipline, 
according to the PASSHE 
Web site. 

The amount for each 
category of the grant for 
Clarion this year is: degrees 
awarded, $700,401; second- 
year persistence rate, 
$173,249; four- and six-year 
graduation rates, $187,530; 



faculty productivity 

$230,000; employee diversi- 
ty, based on the percentage 
of minority faculty, 
$165,597; personnel ratio 
$49,615; instructional cost, 
$292,946; and terminal 
degrees, $297,649, accord- 
ing to University Relations. 

Dr. Joseph Grunenwald, 
president of Clarion 
University, said 

"Performance funding 

becomes a part of the nor- 
mal educational and general 
budget." 

Grunenwald says 

Clarion has put an empha- 
sis on minority recruitment. 

"Minority recruitment 
remains a major challenge 
for Clarion," Grunenwald 
said. 

While minority recruit- 
ment remains a challenge, 
Clarion has improved upon 
this aspect. "The percentage 
of minority faculty has risen 
slowly in recent years to 
11.33 percent and the per- 
centage of minority students 
has risen to 5.30 percent. 
Freshman minority stu- 
dents accounted for 6.03 
percent of last fall's incom- 
ing class," Grunenwald said. 

Grunenwald said 

Clarion needs to keep 
improving the number of 
minority students attending 
the university. "We will need 
to continue to work on 
minority recruiting as a 
major goal for the universi- 
ty," Grunenwald said. 

When the funding began 
in 2000, the amount of the 
total grant for all 14 



PASSHE schools combined 
was $2 million. "It has 
increased every year. , . to an 
amount equivalent to eight 
percent of PASSHE's educa- 
tional and general fund 
appropriation this year," 
according to the PASSHE 
Web site. 

The total amount for all 
14 PASSHE schools this 
year is approximately $37.4 
million. 

The program was initi- 
ated "to encourage the 
Universities to improve both 
student achievement and 
success and in all of their 
daily management opera- 
tions, and to reward them 
when they do," according to 
the PASSHE Web site. 

So far the program has 
been a success. The 
PASSHE reports that the 
four year graduation rate 
had increased from 6.3 per- 
cent in 2000-2001 to 31.3 
percent in 2004-2005 for all 
PASSHE schools combined. 
CUP's six-year graduation 
rate is 50.40%, compared to 
a 53.4% on average for 
PASSHE schools. 

Grunenwald said there has 
been "modest improvement" 
for CUP's graduation rate 
since the program began. 

Each year PASSHE 
schools must improve upon 
the indicators by which they 
are judged in order to con- 
tinue receiving the perform- 
ance funding, according to 
the PASSHE Web site. 

Other PASSHE institu- 
tions receiving performance 
funding were: Bloomsburg, 



$3,274,977; California, 
$3,658,224; Cheyney, 

$370,523; East Stroudsburg, 
$1,829,709; Edinboro, 

$922,485; Indiana, 

$3,930,191; Kutztown, 

$3,031,440; Lock Haven 
$1,518,370; Mansfield, 
$860,060; Millersville, 

$4,902,390; Shippensburg 
$1,823,952; Slippery Rock, 
$4,341,344; and West 
Chester, $4,849,149, accord- 
ing to the PASSHE Web site. 

"Performance funding is 
a tangible demonstration of 
PASSHE's commitment to 
quality education on behalf 
of our students. Not only 
does it help drive our pur- 
suit of excellence in the 
classroom, it further demon- 
strates how seriously we 
take our responsibility to be 
fully accountable to the tax- 
payers of the 
Commonwealth," PASSHE 
Board of Governors 
Chairman Kenneth M. 
Jarin said in a PASSHE 
news release on Sept. 18. 

The PASSHE is made 
up of 14 universities, over 
107,000 students, and over 
250 degree and certification 
programs in over 120 areas 
of study. It is the largest sys- 
tem of higher education in 
the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania, according to 
the PASSHE Web site. 

The combined total for 
all PASSHE institutions of 
$37.4 million dollars was up 
from the $31.2 million that 
was distributed last year. 



"RELAY" continued 
from front page 

"We are hoping for both 
[theatre students and non- 
theatre students], we are in 
our planning stage and 
wanting more theatre stu- 
dents to get involved," said 
Cindy Callihan, American 
Cancer Society Income 
Development Specialist of 
the Clarion/Jefferson Unit. 

Clarion University will 
host the annual Relay for 
Life in April; however, the 
date has yet to be deter- 
mined. 

Relay for Life committee 
members will also be in 
Gemmell throughout 

October selling "Feel Your 
Boobies" merchandise. This 
line of merchandise is a 
national Hne and consists of 
T-shirts, beanie caps, base- 
ball caps, car stickers, win- 



-^^ 


RELAY 
FOR LIFE 


^^ 


American J 

- - Cancer J 

1^ Society S 


^ 




HP- 





;sy of Cancer.org 

Relay for Ufe- CUP will host a Relay for Life event in April 2007. 



dow clings, and buttons. 

A table will be set up 
every Tuesday and 
Thursday from 2 p.m. to 6 
p.m. 

"The [Relay for Life] 
raised about $17,500 last 
year and our goals this year 
are around 30 teams and 
$20,000 fundraised," said 



Sara Pilling, co-chair of the 
Relay for Life committee. 

"The committee has 
many ideas and the teams 
will also be fundraising," 
said Callihan. 

The Relay for Life com- 
mittee, which consists of 
about 15 members, is look- 
ing for volunteers to help 



with the planning and 
recruiting of teams. 

"In my opinion, students 
are receptive of the Relay 
for Life because almost 
everyone can think of some- 
one they know who was 
affected by cancer or are 
affected themselves," said 
co-chair of the Relay for Life 
committee. Amy Faiola. 

Upcoming Relay for Life 
committee meetings are 
Oct. 17 and Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. 
in the Carlson Library 
Conference Room B. 

"We are asking teams to 
be signed up prior to the hol- 
idays so we can plan while 
they are on break," said 
Callihan. 

Teams can sign up by 
attending meetings or can 
also obtain additional infor- 
mation at 
www. cancer, org/relayonline . 



Recognized student organizations allocated money 



Tina Sickler 

Clarion Call Managing Editor 

CLARION, Oct. 2 - Student 
Senate announced the allo- 
cation of money for recog- 
nized student organizations. 
The Clarion Womens' 
Basketball team was allo- 



cated $7,500 from the capi- 
tal account to purchase an 
Interactive Sports Solutions 
System; student senate was 
allocated $2,610 from sup- 
plemental funding to attend 
the Student Government 
Association Conference in 
Dallas, Tx.; the Eyrie 



Magazine was allocated 
$2,415 from supplemental 
funding to attend the 
Associated Press Conference 
in St. Louis, ML; and the 
Financial Management 
Association was allocated 
$2,000 to attend a confer- 
ence in New York City, NY. 



The Clarion Call Weather for Oct. 5-11 








^»/^ 

^ 



m 



>»'' 
^ 



THURSDAY 

Mostly Cloudy 
High 57 Low: 35 



FRIDAY 

Mostly Sunny 
High: 55 Low: 37 



SATURDAY 

Mostly Sunny 
High 61 Low; 42 



Today we will see mostly cloudy skies with 
high temperature of 57°. humidity of 71% and 
an overnight low of 35°. The record high tem-\ 
perature for today is 86* set in 1951. The record 
low is 23° set in 1965. Friday, skies will 
i mostly sunny with a high temperature of 5S*J 
humidity of 71% and an overnight low of 37°^ 
Expect mostly sunny skies to continue Saturday 
with a high temperature of 61' 



SUNDAY 

Mostly Sunny 
High: 69 Low 45 



MONDAY 

Partly Cloudy 

High: 66 Low: 42 



TUESDAY 

Mostly Sunny 
High: 62 low 40 



P.irty 

irtrrmciri 



I Clear 
Temps: Upper 30s 
Preclp Chance: 0% 






I Temps: Mid-40t> 
Predp Chance; 0% 



Local A 



VVt^ek 



Weatlier Trivia 



\ 



WEDNESDAY 

Partly Cloudy 
High: 65 Low: 41 



JiMis Iti/Lo Srmil Pxttip 

Wednesday, *2 7 69,44 <><k'47 0.00" 

Thursday, 9/28 58/46 65/47 0.31" 

Friday. 9/29 51/36 65/46 0.06" 

Saturday, 9/30 51/34 65/46 0.27" 

Sunday, 10/1 61/43 64/45 0.07" 

Monday, 10/2 66/37 64/45 0.01" 

Tuesday, 10/3 66/54 63/45 0.03" 

Total rainfall last week 0.75" 

Normal rainfall last week 0.79" 

Departure from iKMmai -0.04" 

Dam rcptirtnl fnm Dm B wh Jtgt nvt CamMf AlrpaH 



I-. u irue thai thunder make 
milk go sour? 




m 



3tn saAi« pto us itmr SI II on :1 



mmi im 



10/6^ 10/13 I 10/22 I 10/29 
C 20O6 Aci-easw^lhei com. Inc. 



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The Clarion CttU provides a aynopsis of all criminal 
investigations as conducted by the Clartoti University 
Public Safety for the month of October 2CD06 
All information can be acceawd on th« Public Safety 
Web page. 

■ Oct, 1, two females were stopped at 9-23 p.m., after 
offilc»rs detected the odor of marijuana. One of the indi- 
vidaala had marijuana and dnig paraphernalia. 
Charges are pending lab results. 



"ENERGY" continued 
from front page 

The most important part 
about all of these findings is 
that they can be obtained at 
little to no cost at auto/retail 
facilities because the money 
conserved in gasoline will be 
recouped by the businesses 
providing the compUmenta- 
ry services. "Tire manufac- 
tures are behind the 
research because properly 
inflated tires last longer, 
which makes models look 
better" said Pearce. 

Since the time on the 
study, the Wal-Mart tire & 
Lube Express has deter- 
mined the negligible mar- 
ginal cost associated with 
checking and correcting tire 
pressures and decided that 
the cost enables them to 
offer free pressure checks to 
all of its customers. In a 
press release Wal- Mart 
stated : " As a part of its 
overall commitment to help 
shoppers save time and 
money, Wal-Mart offers free 
tire pressure check service 



at its Tire & Lube express, 
which customers can have 
done while they shop." 

This ground-breaking 
research that was conducted 
here on campus was pub- 
lished by the Energy Policy 
journal. The Energy Policy 
journal is the number one 
journal of its type in the 
world. For an article to be 
published in the journal, 
which is published yearly, 
the research that is done 
has to go through rigorous 
review by other prestigious 
members in the same field. 

"The journal contains 
information such as the 
taxes on energy, new forms 
of energy, supply, efficiency, 
the politics of energy usage, 
energy economics and uti- 
lization of energy" said 
Pearce. 

The main message for 
people is to check the tire 
pressures often. When they 
are checked you have the 
reassurance that you are 
saving money (atleast $1 a 
month per vehicle), and 
most importantly you are 
saving lives. 



Homecoming court announced 



Natalie Kennell 
Clarior) Call Staff Writer 

s_nekennell®clarion.edu 

The 2006 Clarion 
University Homecoming 
Court was announced as a 
result of the student elec- 
tions on Sept. 18-20. 

There are a total of 18 
students selected including 
six seniors, four juniors, 
four sophomores, and four 
freshmen. 

The following are the 
members of the 2006 CUP 
Homecoming Court- 
Senior, Jenna Angelos; 
senior, Alison Davis! senior, 
Sheena Zawacki; junior, 
Laura Ferruchie, junior, 
Kristy Marchal; sophomore, 
Jenna Fike! sophomore, 



Samantha Noblitl fresh- 
man, Melissa Gearing, 
freshman, Emma Kelly; 
senior, Justin Dandoy, sen- 
ior, Aaron Fitzpatrick; sen- 
ior, Mike Jones; junior, 
Chuck McKay; junior, Mike 
Skaneski; sophomore, 

Danny Diveley; sophomore, 
Andrew Zachar; freshman. 
Glen Watson; and fresh- 
man, Adam Young. 

The king and queen will 
be announced at the pep 
rally Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. in 
Tippin Gymnasium. 

The court will be pre- 
sented at halftime of the 
homecoming football game 
on Saturday, Oct. 7. 

The court members will 
also participate in the A.L.F. 
parade on Oct. 7 at 12 p.m. 



fry our NEW Chiek»n 
Snack Wrap for jiust $1.29 



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October 5. 2006 



TIffi CLARION CALL 



Page 3 



Mm 



Where did you go Bill?? 




Eric Bowser 
Sports Editor 

s_ekbowswer@clarion.edu 

Has anyone seen Bill 
Cowher? You know the real 
Bill Cowher, the one who 
won a Super Bowl in 
February. The guy who is 
passionate and shows a ton 
of energy on the sidelines. 
Where did he go and who is 
the guy who looks just like 
him standing on the side- 
lines with his arms folded? 

When the reports came 
out a few weeks before the 
season that Cowher might 
retire from the NFL and 
move to North Carolina 
with his family, I was 
shocked. Why would 

Cowher want to leave now? 
He is the head coach on one 
of the most stable organiza- 
tions in the National 
Football League and has a 
job here as long as he pleas- 
es. Unless something really 
bad happened he would 
never get fired by the 
Rooneys and he just won a 
Super Bowl, that alone gives 
him status of a legend in the 
"burgh." 

The answer looks a little 
clearer now. He is already 
gone. His mind seems to 
already be in North 
Carolina laying on the 
beach. Has Cowher ever 
looked so unenthused on the 
sideline in his 15 years 
here? 

All the mistakes that 
have been made in the past 
two games and all Cowher 
has done is stand there with 
his arms crossed. He hasn't 
been in anyone's face chew- 



ing them out hke the Bill 
Cowher Pittsburghers came 
to know and love for the 
past 14 years. 

His game plan stunk in 
Jacksonville, when he decid- 
ed to run most of the team's 
first and second down plays 
right at the best defensive 
line in football when they 
were expecting it. The 
Steelers showed last year in 
the playoffs that they were 
capable of throwing the ball 
effectively, especially when 
their opponent stacked the 
line of scrimmage in an 
attempt to stuff the run 
game. The Steelers even 
came out throwing on the 
first two plays, both of 
which were first downs, and 
Cowher still felt compelled 
to run straight at 
Jacksonville. 

Jacksonville is best 
known for their two mon- 
sters at defensive tackle, 
John Henderson and 
Marcus Stroud, both of 
whom tip in at over 300 
pounds. Obviously, in the 
Bill Cowher school of coach- 
ing, the best way to attack 
such a defense is to run 
right at them with 200 
pound Willie Parker. That 
makes sense doesn't it? At 
least let Parker run outside 
and use his speed, he was 
doomed if they made him 
run inside all night long and 
his final stats, 11 carries for 
20 yards, showed it. 

Last Sunday against 
Cincinnati, Cowher stuck 
with the run and this time it 
worked; then again it was 



against the same defense 
that New England just ter- 
rorized this past Sunday. 
Parker had a terrific game 
and had the Steelers in posi- 
tion for a huge win that 
would have got the Steelers 
to a 2-1 record and kept 
them tied with Cincinatti. 

The defense looked solid 
all game long and with just 
over eight minutes remain- 
ing in the game stopped the 
Bengals and were giving the 
offense the ball with the 
lead. A recipe for success 
that Cowher has used 
throughout his career in 
Pittsburgh, get the ball with 
the lead late in the game 
and kill the clock. The task 
didn't seem to tall seeing as 
how Cincinnati's defense 
looks completely lost 
against a team that can run 
well. 

So Cowher sticks 
Ricardo Colclough out to 
return the punt, a spot that 
Colclough has struggled at 
throughout his career, when 
he could have easily put 
Santonio Holmes in. 
Instead, Colclough fumbled 
the punt that led to the first 
of two Cincinnati touch- 
downs in a 54-8econd span. 

Two things remain in 
the Steelers favor this sea- 
son, the first being that the 
two teams they are chasing, 
Baltimore and Cincinnati, 
have brutal schedules 
remaining. Baltimore (4-0) 
has eight games remaining 
against opponents with .500 
records or better including 
seven of the next eight, 
while Cincinnati (3-1) has 
nine games against teams 
with .500 records or better. 

Baltimore has looked 
shaky in their past two 
games against decent teams 
after beating up on two 
teams who have yet to win a 
game. Cincinnati doesn't 
look like they could stop a 



team full of girl scouts from 
running on them and 
regardless of what many 
people say their offense 
looks flat. Chad Johnson 
looks like he's spending too 
much time coming up with 
touchdown celebrations, 
rather than actually scoring 
touchdowns. Carson Palmer 
seems to have regressed 
these past two games being 
consistently bothered by 
blitzes, which has led to five 
fumbles and two intercep- 
tions. 

The Steelers would have 
held the Bengals to just 14 
points if not for two killer 
fumbles that cost them the 
game late and this past 
week a beat up and aging 
New England defense held 
them to just 13 points. 

The second thing in the 
Steelers favor, stupidity is 
fixable. All the mistakes 
that were made are in the 
past. This team proved last 
year that they can be at 
their best when people 
expect the worst. The guys 
on the team actually prefer 
to be the underdog, they rel- 
ished the role last season 
and it brought them a cham- 
pionship. The Steelers had 
three straight games last 
year, losses to Baltimore, 
Indianapolis and Cincinnati 
that were worse than the 
two losses this season and 
happened much later in the 
year. 

Everything will be fine 
as long as Cowher realizes 
the season starts and comes 
back from lala land. The 
game against San Diego is 
very winnable. The Steelers 
proved they can win there 
last year and the Chargers 
have had trouble this season 
against formidable oppo- 
nents. 

The author is a sophomore 
communication major and 
Sports Editor of The Call. 



rve got all the reasons for the season 




Adrienne Cain 
Columnist 

s_acain@clarion.edu 



While I am searching in 
my life for eternal summer 
and it is my favorite of all 
seasons, there is a little 
thing I look forward to in 
the autumn. This is, of 
course, Halloween, the best 
of the holidays. Lately, 
though, I'm becoming con- 
cerned about the safety of 
this holiday. Santa has it 
out for Halloween and I'm 
becoming concerned. 

1 am sick of Santa stick- 
ing his nose in where it 
doesn't belong. I've noticed 
him weasel-creeping his 
way in and quite frankly, 
the next holiday in his 
greedy path is The Fourth of 
July. If something isn't 
done, we are going to be 
decking the tree with fire- 
works in a few years and 
that is just a blatant fire 
hazard. 

I walked into the "lawn 
and garden'" holiday part of 
Wal-Mart the other day to 
peruse the fake hair, fake 
fangs, and fake spider webs 
that make my Halloween a 
merry time. I discovered 
that after three aisles, sud- 
denlv the colors of the world 



went from black and red to 
red and green. After I 
stopped cursing the Jolly 
Man of Wintertime, I 
paused to wonder, where 
will this hostile take over by 
Christmas end? Halloween 
is the best holiday there is! 
How dare he? 

Now you may be won- 
dering (or complaining) why 
is Halloween superior to 
(insert your lame holiday 
here)? Well, believe me; I 
have all the reasons for the 
season. 

1. Free Candy - While 
this mostly applies to those 
under 15, and losers over 
that age, free candy is in 
abundance at this time of 
year. Many people keep a 
little Halloween dish of 
candy in their home or work 
place. Candy is expensive 
most of the time. Halloween 
let's you indulge yourself at 
your neighbor's expense. 
Seriously, who argues with 
free candy? 

2. Candy as a Measure 
of Personal Success - While 
this is more of a novelty rea- 
son, it is still a valid point. 
At what other point in your 
life is candy a measure of 
your success? At what other 
point in your life is a good 
haul (or paycheck as the 
analogy goes) denoted by 
how many Reese's Cups, full 
size candy bars, and cans of 
soda you received? Unless 
an EMP causes us to all lose 
our money (see: "Dark 
Angel") and we return to a 
barter society based on 
candy, this isn't going to 
happen. In fact, I feel a little 



dumber for even suggesting 
it. Let's move on. 

3. Costumes - Unless 
you have the sense of humor 
of a wood block, dressing up 
is a lot of fun. Whether you 
go the route of the standard 
Halloween fare (Vampires/ 
Pirates/ Witches/ Storm 
Troopers) or whether you go 
all out crazy (Cactus/ Baked 
Potato/ Pinata) the desire to 
transform yourself into 
something new is irrepress- 
ible. Who says you can't be a 
creepy puppet master and 
make all your children into 
silent and equally creepy 
marionettes? In fact, chil- 
dren are very impressive 
and will net you not just a 
few extra Reese's Cups. 

Halloween is an equal 
opportunity judge as well. 
The ten dollars you spent on 
a plastic bag and bunch of 
balloons to go as a bag of 
jelly beans is a lot more 
impressive and creative 
than that neighbor who 
shelled out sixty dollars on a 
store bought bit of mass pro- 
duction. Halloween encour- 
ages creativity like no other 
structured hoUday can. 

4. No Family 
Commitment - While on 
most other holidays you are 
supposed to sit down with 
your family and be grateful 
for them while simultane- 
ously putting the most 
annoying members (the kids 
and Uncle Larry) at a sepa- 
rate table (hopefully in a 
separate room), Halloween 
is a pick your poison occa- 
sion. You can do the family 
thing and pass out the can- 



dies to the neighborhood 
kids, or spend the time with 
friends or lovers. Since fam- 
ily is a major cause of stress 
at most holidays, you can 
see how Halloween flaunts 
its superiority here. You 
don't want to deal with Aunt 
Millie and her obsessive 
photo-book of pictures of her 
cats, you don't have to. 

5. Ghosts - There is a 
magic in the air on 
Halloween night that hap- 
pens no other time of the 
year. You may see ghosts 
from time to time in your 
ordinary life, but the con- 
centration of them on 
Halloween is well nigh 
supernatural. Rim shot! 
Maybe seeing ghosts isn't 
the most compelling reason 
for you, but I'm happy to see 
any ghost that isn't the 
ghost of Givan's third floor 
bathroom... I hate that 
ghost. 

6. Haunted Houses - 
While this may not be every- 
one's cup of tea, it is the 
closest most people will ever 
get to a horror fUm. If at any 
time in your lift you look 
around and wonder if some- 
thing is lurking in the dark- 
ness, and you get any kind 
of thrill from it, then the 
Haunted House is for you. It 
could be the classic creaky 
house or a tunnel under a 
pyramid, the basic idea is 
the same: dark and poten- 
tially dangerously scary. 

7. Jack-o-lanterns - 
What part of gutting a 
pumpkin isn't fun? 
Honestly... 

8. Dedication to the 



lllorial. kHm to IIh; Kior and I all on Ion 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-3932557 

Web: clarioncall.clarion.edu E-mail: call9clarion.edu 

Executive Board 

2006-2007 
Lindsay Grystar, Amy Kaylor, 

Editor-in-Chief Business Manager 



Tina Sickler, 
Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desniond, 
Features Editor 

Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 



Michael Balchin, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
Photos & Graphics Editor 

Josh Doran, 
Online Editor 

Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 



Dr. Susan Hilton 
Adviser 

Staff 

Hem Natalie Kennell, Kelly Pennlsl, Adam Mohney, 
Shakira O'Neil, Krystal nnkbeiner F— turaai Danielle 
Butcherlne anprtitonfiwife Dominic Glallombardo, Emily 
Aaron, Robyn Gray, Grace Regalado Sowty Chris Parks, 
Robert Ranktn, Katelyn Munrean Ce^ EsMs^ Micheie 
Straub, Nicole Bovaird. Adrienne Cain Advwtt^nn^ Lauren 
Couch, Courtney Krol, Jenna Peno, Mike Smith Butfnuf; 
Sarah Sleiski, Stephanie Corso, Shawn Turner, Ben ElMot 
PhgJPgartlY and QrwHlteK Bethany Ross, Mike Cauvel, 
MIsha Snyder, Jenifer Poblete, Phi! Drelick, Thomas Fair 
Ctreuia^kyB Eric Levy, Allison Kerr, Nicole Lawrence, John 
Blumer, Ryan Bridge, Bryan Bingham, Steve Cooper 

Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is pubitshed most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and obscen- 
ity: the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
•Th^ must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mond^s. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only tmed 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive l^jard. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co^urricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilitl^ for the entire semester will be granted a co-cun'Icutar. 

The CSarion Call is funded b^ advertising re^nue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 

B opinions expr^sed in this 
pubiication are tfiose of the writer or speak- 
er, and do not necessariiy reflect the opin- 
ions of the newspaper staff, student txnfy, 
Clarion University or the community. 



Dark Side - There are 
month long horror festivals 
on TV, an increase of horror 
films at the theatres, and 
everyone you know sudden- 
ly has half a dozen scary sto- 
ries to tell. This isn't a 
sweetness and light event 
for everyone. Here is a holi- 
day with solid adult appeal. 
Most of the other holidays 
may peak for the under 15 
crowd but year after year 
Halloween wants those 
above that age to have a 
good time too. 

The bottom line is that 
Halloween is the holiday of 
creativity and freedom. It's 
an entire holiday devoted to 
the darker, rougher, and 
scarier side of life. 
Thanksgiving may be all 
about thankfulness and the 
harvest, the winter holidays 
may be all about the togeth- 
erness that comes with the 
snowy isolation and lethar- 
gy, and the spring holidays 
may be all about the rebirth 
of the world (bunnies and 
eggs!), but Halloween is 
about the creepy things that 
stalk the night and the dead 



walking among us. 
Halloween doesn't care if 
you are six or sixty. 
Halloween is here to taunt 
the edges of your vision with 
possibilities. Halloween is 
here for you. 

So what was that about 
Santa? You've noticed it too, 
I am sure. He is creeping 
ahead further and further in 
the year. He swallowed up 
Thanksgiving (Black Friday 
anyone?) and is working on 
Halloween. Only we can 
stop his nefarious plot! 
Write your local stores, 
write the North Pole, take a 
stand against his oppres- 
sion! 

Or go run empty a few 
aerosol cans. I'm sure if we 
can kick this global warm- 
ing thing up a notch we 
could eliminate the "white 
Christmas" in a few years. 
Let's see that greedy bas- 
tard land his sled when the 
roof is bone dry and we are 
all kicking around in san- 
dals in December. 

I promise I have no ulte- 
rior motives of making it 
eternal summer Honest. 



Page 2 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



October 5. 2006 



lews 



CUP received performance funding 
grant exceeding $2 miiiion 



Adam Mohney 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s^ajmohney@clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Oct. 3 - Clarion 
University recently received 
a performance funding 
grant from the 

IVnnsylvania State System 
of Higher Education 
(PASSHE)onSept. 18.2006 
which was ba.'^ed on a series 
of indicators set by the State 
System. 

The grant, which totaled 
$2.09().98(i, was the largest 
ever received by CUP since 
the performance funding 
program began in July 2000, 
according to University 
Relations. The amount of 
money allotted by the 
PASSHE is determined by 
the university's success in 
meeting a series of eight 
indicators and then adjust- 
ed for the size of the school, 
according to the PASSHE 
Web site (www.passhe.edu). 

The indicators include 
student retention and grad- 
uation rates, degrees award- 
ed, instructional cost per 
student and the percentage 
of full-time tenured and 
tenure-track instructional 
faculty with terminal 
degrees in their disciphne, 
according to the PASSHE 
Web site. 

The amount for each 
category of the grant for 
Clarion this year is: degrees 
awarded, $700,401: second- 
year persistence rate, 
$173,249: four and six-year 
graduation rates, $187,530: 



faculty productivity 

$230,000: employee diversi- 
ty, based on the percentage 
of minority faculty, 
$165,597: personnel ratio 
$49,615; instructional cost, 
$292,946; and terminal 
degrees, $297,649, accord- 
ing to University Relations. 

Dr. Joseph Grunenwald, 
president of Clarion 
University. said 

"Performance funding 

becomes a part of the nor- 
mal educational and general 
budget." 

Grunenwald says 

Clarion has put an empha- 
sis on minority recruitment. 

"Minority recruitment 
remains a major challenge 
for Clarion," Grunenwald 
said. 

While minority recruit- 
ment remains a challenge. 
Clarion has improved upon 
this aspect. "The percentage 
of minority faculty has risen 
slowly in recent years to 
11.33 percent and the per- 
centage of minority students 
has risen to 5.30 percent. 
Freshman minority stu- 
dents accounted for 6.03 
percent of last fall's incom- 
ing class," Grunenwald said. 

Grunenwald said 

Clarion needs to keep 
improving the number of 
minority students attending 
the university. "We will need 
to continue to work on 
minority recruiting as a 
major goal for the universi- 
ty." Grunenwald said. 

When the funding began 
in 2000. the amount of the 
total grant for all 14 



PASSHE schools combined 
was $2 million. "It has 
increased every year... to an 
amount equivalent to eight 
percent of PASSHE's educa- 
tional and general fund 
appropriation this year," 
according to the PASSHE 
Web site. 

The total amount for all 
14 PASSHE schools this 
year is approximately $37.4 
million. 

The program was initi- 
ated "to encourage the 
Universities to improve both 
student achievement and 
success and in all of their 
daily management opera- 
tions, and to reward them 
when they do." according to 
the PASSHE Web .site. 

So far the program has 
been a success. The 
PASSHE reports that the 
four year graduation rate 
had increased from 6.3 per- 
cent in 2000-2001 to 31.3 
percent in 2004-2005 for all 
PASSHE schools combined. 
CUP's six-year graduation 
rate is 50.40%, compared to 
a 53.4% on average for 
PASSHE schools. 

Grunenwald said there has 
been "modest improvement" 
for CUP's graduation rate 
since the program began. 

Each year PASSHE 
schools must improve upon 
the indicators by which they 
are judged in order to con- 
tinue receiving the perform- 
ance funding, according to 
the PASSHE Web site. 

Other PASSHE institu- 
tions receiving performance 
funding were: Bloomsburg. 



$3,274,977; California. 
$3,658,224; Cheyney. 

$370,523; East Stroudsburg. 
$1,829,709; Edinboro. 

$922,485: Indiana. 

$3,930,191; Kutztown. 

$3,031,440; Lock Haven 
$1,518,370; Mansfield. 

$860,060; Millersville. 

$4,902,390; Shippensburg 
$1,823,952; Slippery Rock, 
$4,341,344; and West 
Chester, $4,849,149. accord- 
ing to the PASSHE Web site. 

"Performance funding is 
a tangible demonstration of 
PASSHE's commitment to 
quality education on behalf 
of our students. Not only 
does it help drive our pur- 
suit of excellence in the 
classroom, it further demon- 
strates how seriously we 
take our responsibility to be 
fully accountable to the tax- 
payers of the 
Commonwealth." PASSHE 
Board of Governors 
Chairman Kenneth M. 
Jarin said in a PASSHE 
news release on Sept. 18. 

The PASSHE is made 
up of 14 universities, over 
107,000 students, and over 
250 degree and certification 
programs in over 120 areas 
of study. It is the largest sys- 
tem of higher education in 
the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania, according to 
the PASSHE Web site. 

The combined total for 
all PASSHE institutions of 
$37.4 million dollars was up 
from the $31.2 million that 
was distributed last year. 



"RELAY" continued 
from front page 

"We are hoping for both 
[theatre students and non- 
theatre students], we are in 
our planning stage and 
wanting more theatre stu- 
dents to get involved," said 
Cindy Callihan. American 
Cancer Society Income 
Development Specialist of 
the Clarion/Jefferson Unit. 

Clarion University will 
host the annual Relay for 
Life in April: however, the 
date has yet to be deter- 
mined. 

Relay for Life committee 
members will also be in 
Gemmell throughout 

October selling "Feel Your 
Boobies" merchandise. This 
line of merchandise is a 
national line and consists of 
T-shirts, beanie caps, base- 
ball caps, car stickers, win- 




Graphic courtesy of Cancer.org 
Relay for Life- CUP will host a Relay for Life event in April 2007. 



dow clings, and buttons. 

A table will be set up 
every Tuesday and 
Thursday from 2 p.m. to 6 
p.m. 

"The [Relay for Life] 
raised about $17,500 last 
year and our goals this year 
are around 30 teams and 
$20,000 fundraised," said 



Sara Pilling, co-chair of the 
Relay for Life committee. 

"The committee has 
many ideas and the teams 
will also be fundraising," 
said Callihan. 

The Relay for Life com- 
mittee, which consists of 
about 15 members, is look- 
ing for volunteers to help 



with the planning and 
recruiting of teams. 

"In my opinion, students 
are receptive of the Relay 
for Life because almost 
everyone can think of some- 
one they know who was 
affected by cancer or are 
affected themselves," said 
co-chair of the Relay for Life 
committee, Amy Faiola. 

Upcoming Relay for Life 
committee meetings are 
Oct. 17 and Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. 
in the Carlson Library 
Conference Room B. 

"We are asking teams to 
be signed up prior to the hol- 
idays so we can plan while 
they are on break," said 
Callihan. 

Teams can sign up by 
attending meetings or can 
also obtain additional infor- 
mation at 
www.cancer.org/relayonline. 



Recognized student organizations allocated money 



Tina Sickler 

Clarion Call Managing Editor 

CLARION, Oct. 2 - Student 
Senate announced the allo- 
cation of money for recog- 
nized student organizations. 
The Clarion Womens' 
Basketball team was allo- 



cated $7,500 from the capi- 
tal account to purchase an 
Interactive Sports Solutions 
System; student senate was 
allocated $2,610 from sup- 
plemental funding to attend 
the Student Government 
Association Conference in 
Dallas. Tx.; the Eyrie 



Magazine was allocated 
$2,415 from supplemental 
funding to attend the 
Associated Press Conference 
in St. Louis, ML; and the 
Financial Management 
Association was allocated 
$2,000 to attend a confer- 
ence in New York City, NY. 



The Clarion Call Weather for Oct. 5 - 11 



7-Day Forecast 



Local In-Depth Forecast 



Party Forecast 






^' 






^^ 






.» '. 



^!^^ 



THURSDAY 

Mostly ( loudy 
High 57 Li)v» I? 



FRIDAY 

MosiK Sunny 
High 'S I ii« '<7 



SATURDAY 

Mostly Sunny 
lliyl! f^) l.m 42 



SUNDAY 

Mostly Sunny 
High: M Low 45 



MONDAY 

Pdlti> I iuud> 

High (-(i I o» 42 



TUESDAY 

Mostly Sunn\ 
High (C I .m 4(1 



WEDNESDAY 

Partly ( l.nidy 
High «'5 I <m 41 



Today wc will see mostly cloudy skies will 
high temperature of 57". humidity ot 'i . ind 
an overnight low of 35". The record high tern 
peraturc tor today is S6" set in 1951. The recoril 
low IS 2T SCI in l<)f)5 Friday, skies will bi; 
mostly sunny with a high temperature of 55" 
humidity of 71<>;, and an overnight low of .17" 
I xpetl mostly sunny skies lo continue Saturdav 
with a high temperature of 61^^ 



BPrid«.Y MbST 




Clear 

leinps: Upper Mh 

Preclp Chanee: 0".i 



Mtjhl 



Clear 

l'cmp»: Mid-4()s 

Preeip Chance: 0"/o 



Local Almanac Last Week 



Weather Trivia 



Iw'ednesday. yi'27 
Thursday. 9 28 
Iriday. 9 29 
Saturday. 9 M) 
Sundav. 10 1 
Monday 10 2 
Tucsdav, I0'3 



TEEfl Hsiutul Pifftp 

69,44 66-47 0.00" 

58 46 65-47 0.11" 

51.16 65/46 06" 

5134 65/46 0.27" 

614.1 64 45 07" 

66 17 64'45 01" 

6654 6145 0.01" 

lotal minfall last week 0.75" 

Normal rainfall last week 79" 

IX-parture Irotn nonnal -0 (14 

Dtua reported from Du Bnis-Jeffenvn Cunnn 4irpart 



l\ II rruf Ihal tliiiiulrr ikuIilM M 
milk ^o sour' ■ 



E 



.->|ri v.-iMYi (>|o ur isnl vt ii os^ :i,iUfuV 



Moon Phases 



%- 



\ lO/f. I 10/13 I 10/22 I 10/29 | 



^itor^ A,i>--.\\'>iiiiht'( iitm. tm 



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Call (814) 227-1238 

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The Clarion Call provides a synopsis of all criminal 
investigations as conducted by the Clarion University 
Public Safety for the month of October 2006. 
All information can be accessed on the Public Safety 
Web page. 

■ Oct. 1, two females were stopped at 9:23 p.m., after 
officers detected the odor of marijuana. One of the indi- 
viduals had marijuana and drug paraphernalia. 
Charges are pending lab results. 



"ENERGY" continued 
from front page 

The most important part 
about all of these findings is 
that they can be obtained at 
little to no cost at auto/retail 
facilities because the money 
conserved in gasohne will be 
recouped by the businesses 
providing the complimenta- 
ry services. "Tire manufac- 
tures are behind the 
research because properly 
inflated tires last longer, 
which makes models look 
better" said Pearce. 

Since the time on the 
study, the Wal-Mart tire & 
Lube Express has deter- 
mined the negligible mar- 
ginal cost as.sociated with 
checking and correcting tire 
pressures and decided that 
the cost enables them to 
offer free pressure checks to 
all of its customers. In a 
press release Wal- Mart 
stated : " As a part of its 
overall commitment to help 
shoppers save time and 
money, Wal-Mart offers free 
tire pressure check service 



at its Tire & Lube express, 
which customers can have 
done while they shop." 

This ground-breaking 
research that was conducted 
here on campus was pub- 
lished by the Energy Policy 
journal. The Energy Policy 
journal is the number one 
journal of its type in the 
world. For an article to be 
published in the journal, 
which is published yearly, 
the research that is done 
has to go through rigorous 
review by other prestigious 
members in the same field. 

"The journal contains 
information such as the 
taxes on energy, new forms 
of energy, supply, efficiency, 
the politics of energy usage, 
energy economics and uti- 
lization of energy" said 
Pearce. 

The main message for 
people is to check the tire 
pressures often. When they 
are checked you have the 
reassurance that you are 
saving money (atleast $1 a 
month per vehicle), and 
most importantly you are 
saving lives. 



Homecoming court announced 



Natalie Kennell 
Clarior) Call Staff Writer 

s_nekennell@clarion.e(Ju 

The 2006 Clarion 
University Homecoming 
Court was announced as a 
result of the student elec- 
tions on Sept. 18-20. 

There are a total of 18 
students selected including 
six seniors, four juniors, 
four sophomores, and four 
freshmen. 

The following are the 
members of the 2006 CUP 
Homecoming Court: 

Senior, Jenna Angelos: 
senior, Alison Davis; senior, 
Sheena Zawackii junior, 
Laura Ferruchie, junior, 
Kristy MarchaK sophomore, 
Jenna Fike; sophomore, 



Samantha Noblit; fresh- 
man, Melissa Gearing, 
freshman, Emma Kelly; 
senior, Justin Dandoy, sen- 
ior, Aaron Fitzpatrick; sen- 
ior, Mike Jones; junior. 
Chuck McKay; junior, Mike 
Skaneski; sophomore, 

Danny Diveley; sophomore, 
Andrew Zachar; freshman. 
Glen Watson; and fresh- 
man, Adam Young. 

The king and queen will 
be announced at the pep 
rally Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. in 
Tippin Gymnasium. 

The court will be pre- 
sented at halftime of the 
homecoming football game 
on Saturday, Oct. 7. 

The court members will 
also participate in the A.L.F. 
parade on Oct. 7 at 12 p.m. 




Chickei 
Wrap for just $1 

We bo me back, students! Visatone ofour two Clanon 
locations (Main StKet<fe across from Wal*Maii1 to try 
our new items like Chicken Snack Wraps &. Iced Cof- 
fee, oruse the coupons below for bng- time fevorites. 

BUY ONE lAf J^^ WWFFiH' ' 

iP^^ Present tNs coupon «wh«n you buy ^| 

jn E99 McMuffinsjndwMch and iftc«iv« a second on« 
ff ee. UfTHt on« food item per coupon, per customer, per 
visit Not vahd yitt* «ny other offer 

Valid in Claripn 

Ex|>ir«6 10f1J06 

t^*^ Present ttis coupon iMhen you buy ^j 





tt ttis coupon iMhen you buy 
a Quarter PourMJer sandtMich ar>d receive a second one 
free. Limit one food »em per coupor*. per customer, per 
visit Notvaldi««h any other offer /\ /\ 




October 5, 2006 



Tiffi CLARION CALL 



Page 3 



l/mi 



Where did you go Bill?? 




Eric Bowser 
Sports Editor 

s._ekbowswei@clanon.edii 

Has anyoni' seen Hill 
Cowhi'i'.' Y(iu know tht real 
Hill Cowher, the one who 
won a Super Howl in 
February. The guy who is 
passionate and shows a ton 
of energy on the .sidelines. 
Where did he go and wht) is 
the guy who looks just like 
him standing on the side- 
Hnes with his arms folded? 

When the reports came 
nut a few v^eeks before the 
s(>ason that Cowher might 
retire from the NFL and 
move to North Carolina 
with his family, I was 
shocked. Why would 

Cowher want to leave now? 
He is the head coach on one 
of the most stable organiza- 
tions in the National 
Football League and has a 
job heie as lon|» as he pleas- 
I's. Unless .something really 
had happened he would 
never get fired by the 
Rooney s and he just won a 
Super Bowl, that alone gives 
him status of a legend in the 
"burgh." 

The answer looks a little 
clearer now. He is already 
sone. His mind seems to 
already be in North 
Carolina laying on the 
beach. Has Cowher ever 
looked so unent bused on the 
sideline in his 15 yeai's 
here? 

All the mistakes that 
have been made in the past 
two games and all Cowher 
has done is stand there with 
his arms crossed. He hasn't 
been in anyone's face chew- 



ing them out like the Bill 
Cowher Fittsburgheis came 
to know and love for the 
past 1 4 years. 

His game plan stunk in 
Jacksonville, when he decid- 
ed to run most of the team's 
first and second down plays 
right at the best defensive 
line in football when they 
were expecting it. The 
Steelers showed last year in 
the playoffs that they were 
capable of throwing the ball 
effectively, especially when 
their opponent stacked the 
line of scrimmage in an 
attempt to stuff the run 
game. The Steelers even 
came out throwing on the 
fii-st two plays, both of 
which were first downs, and 
Cowher still felt compelled 
to run straight at 
Jacksonville. 

Jacksonville is best 
known for their two mon- 
sters at defensive tackle, 
John Henderson and 
Marcus Stroud, both of 
whom tip in at over 300 
pounds. Obviously, in the 
Bill Cowher school of coach- 
ing, the best way to attack 
such a defense is to run 
right at them with 200 
pound Willie Parker. That 
makes sen.^^e doesn't it? At 
least let Parker run outside 
and use his speed, he was 
doomed if they made him 
run inside all night long and 
his final stats, 11 carries for 
20 yards, showed it. 

Last Sunday against 
Cincinnati, Cowher stuck 
with the run and this time it 
worked; then again it was 



against the same defense 
that New Kngland just ter- 
rorized this past Sunday. 
Farker had a terrific game 
and had the Steelers in posi- 
tion for a huge win that 
would have got the Steelers 
to a 21 record and kept 
them tied with Cincinatti. 

The defense looked solid 
all game long and with jjst 
over eight minutes remain- 
ing in the game stopped the 
Bengals and were giving the 
offense the ball with the 
lead. A recipe for success 
that Cowher has used 
throughout his career in 
Pittsburgh, get the ball with 
the lead late in the game 
and kill the clock. The task 
didn't -seem to tall seeing as 
how Cincinnati's defense 
looks completely lost 
against a team that can run 
well. 

So Cowher sticks 
Ricardo Colclough out to 
return the punt, a spot that 
Colclough has struggled at 
throughout his career, when 
he could have easily put 
Santonio Holmes in. 
Instead, Colclough fumbled 
the punt that led to the first 
of two Cincinnati touch- 
downs in a 54-second span. 

Two things remain in 
the Steelers favor this sea- 
son, the first being that the 
two teams they are chasing. 
Baltimore and Cincinnati, 
have brutal schedules 
remaining. Baltimore (4-0) 
has eight games remaining 
against opponents with .500 
records or better including 
seven of the next eight, 
while Cincinnati (;M) has 
nine games against teams 
with .500 records or better. 

Baltimore has looked 
shaky in their past two 
games against decent teams 
after beating up on two 
teams who have yet to win a 
game. Cincinnati doesn't 
look like they could stop a 



team full of girl scouts from 
running on them and 
regardless of what many 
people say their offense 
looks flat. Chad Johnson 
looks like he's spending too 
much time coming up with 
touchdown celebrations, 
rather than actually scoring 
touchdowns. Carson Palmer 
seems to have regressed 
these past two games being 
consistently bothered by 
blitzes, which has led to five 
fumbles and two intercep- 
tions. 

The Steelers would have 
held the Bengals to just 14 
points if not for two killer 
fumbles that cost them the 
game late and this past 
week a beat up and aging 
New England defense held 
them to just 18 points. 

The .second thing in the 
Steelers favor, stupidity is 
fixable. All the mistakes 
that were made are in the 
past. This team proved last 
year that they can be at 
their best when people 
expect the worst. The guys 
on the team actually prefer 
to be the underdog, they rel- 
ished the role last season 
and it brought them a cham- 
pionship. The Steelers had 
three straight games last 
year, losses to Baltimore. 
Indianapolis and Cincinnati 
that were worse than the 
two losses this season and 
happened much later in the 
year. 

Everything will be fine 
as long as Cowher realizes 
the season starts and comes 
back from lala land. The 
game against San Diego is 
very winnable. The Steelers 
proved they can win there 
last year and the Chargers 
have had trouble this season 
against formidable oppo- 
nents. 

The author is a sophomore 
com m u nica tion m ajor and 
Sports Editor of The Call. 



I've got all the reasons for the season 




, Adrienne Cain 
Columnist 

s acain@clanon.edu 



While I am searching in 
my life for eternal summer 
and it is my favorite of all 
seasons, there is a little 
thing I look forward to in 
the autumn. This is, of 
course, Halloween, the best 
of the holidays. Lately, 
though. I'm becoming con- 
cerned aliout the safety of 
this holiday. Santa has it 
out for Halloween and I'm 
becoming concerned. 

1 am sick of Santa stick- 
ing his nose in where it 
doesn't belong. I've noticed 
him weasel-creeping his 
way in and quite frankly, 
the next holiday in his 
greedy path is The Fourth of 
July. If something isn't 
done, we are going to be 
decking the tree with fire- 
works in a few years and 
that is just a blatant fire 
hazard. 

I walked into the "lawn 
and garden" holiday part of 
Wal-Mart the other day to 
peruse the fake hair, fake 
fangs, and fake spider webs 
that make my Halloween a 
merry time. 1 discovered 
that after three aisles, sud- 
denlv the colors of the world 



went from black and red to 
red and green. After 1 
stopped cursing the Jolly 
.Man of Wintertime. I 
paused to wonder, where 
will this hostile take over by 
Christmas end? Halloween 
is the best holiday there is! 
How dare he? 

Now you may be won- 
dering (or complainmg) why 
is Halloween superior to 
(insert your lame holiday 
here)? Well, believe me; 1 
have all the reasons for the 
season. 

1. Free Candy - While 
this mostly applies to those 
under 15, and lo.sers over 
that age, free candy is in 
abundance at this time of 
year. Many people keep a 
little Halloween dish of 
candy in their home or work 
place. Candy is expensive 
most of the time. Halloween 
let's you indulge yourself at 
your neighbor's expense. 
Seriously who argues with 
free candy? 

2. Candy as a Measure 
of Personal Success - While 
this is more of a novelty rea- 
.son. it is still a valid point. 
At what other pomt in your 
life is candy a measure of 
your success? At what other 
point in your life is a good 
haul (or paycheck as the 
analogy goes) denoted by 
how many Reese's Cups, full 
size candy bars, and cans of 
soda you received? Unless 
an EMP causes us to all lose 
our money (see- "Dark 
Angel") and we return to a 
barter society based on 
candy, this isn't going to 
happen. In fact. I feel a little 



dumber for even suggesting 
it. Let's move on. 

3. Costumes - Unless 
you have the sense of humor 
of a wood block, dressing up 
is a lot of fun. Whether you 
go the route of the standard 
Halloween fare (Vampires/ 
Pirates/ Witches/ Storm 
Troopers) or whether you go 
all out crazy (Cactus/ Baked 
Potato/ Pinata) the desire to 
transform yourself into 
something new is irrepress- 
ible. Who says you can't be a 
creepy puppet master and 
make all your children into 
silent and equally creepy 
marionettes? In fact, chil- 
dren are very impressive 
and will net you not just a 
few extra Reese's Cups. 

Halloween is an equal 
opportunity judge as well. 
The ten dollars you spent on 
a plastic bag and bunch of 
balloons to go as a bag of 
jelly beans is a lot more 
impressive and creative 
than that neighbor who 
shelled out sixty dollars on a 
store bought bit of mass pro- 
duction. Halloween encour- 
ages creativity like no other 
structured holiday can. 

4. No Family 
Commitment - While on 
most other holidays you are 
supposed to sit down with 
your family and be grateful 
for them while simultane- 
ously putting the most 
annoying members (the kids 
and Uncle Larry) at a sepa- 
rate table (hopefully in a 
separate room), Halloween 
is a pick your poison occa- 
sion. You can do the family 
thing and pass out the can- 



dies to the neighborhood 
kids, or spend the time with 
friends or lovers. Since fam- 
ily is a major cause of stress 
at most holidays, you can 
see how Halloween flaunts 
its superiority here. You 
don't want to deal with Aunt 
Millie and her obsessive 
photo-book of pictures of her 
cats, you don't have to. 

5. Ghosts - There is a 
magic in the air on 
Halloween night that hap- 
pens no other time of the 
year. You may see ghosts 
from time to time in your 
ordinary life, but the con- 
centration of them on 
Halloween is well nigh 
supernatural. Rim shot! 
Maybe seeing ghosts isn't 
the most compelling reason 
for you, but I'm happy to see 
any ghost that isn't the 
ghost of Givan's third floor 
bathroom... I hate that 
ghost. 

6. Haunted Houses - 
While this may not be every- 
one's cup of tea, it is the 
closest most people will ever 
get to a horror film. If at any 
time in your life you look 
around and wonder if some- 
thing is lurking in the dark- 
ness, and you get any kind 
of thrill from it, then the 
Haunted House is for you. It 
could be the classic creaky 
house or a tunnel under a 
pyramid, the basic idea is 
the same: dark and poten- 
tially dangerously scary. 

7. Jack-o-lanterns - 
What part of gutting a 
pumpkin isn't fun? 
Honestly... 

8. Dedication to the 



fjliliiiiiil Jjilm III IhHiililiir iiiiil I all (in 1(111 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: clarioncall.Glarion.edu E-mail: cail(9clarion.edu 

Executive Board 

2006-2007 
Lindsay Grystar, Amy Kaylor, 

Editor-in-Chief Business Manager 



Tina Sickler, 
Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desmond, 
Features Editor 

Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 



Michael Balchin, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
Photos & Graphics Editor 

Josh Doran, 
Online Editor 

Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 



Dr. Susan Hilton 
Adviser 

Staff 

News: Natalie Kennell, Kelly PennisI, Adam Mohney, 
Shakira O'Nell, Krystal FInkbeiner Features; Danielle 
Butcherine Entertainment: Dominic Giallombardo, Emily 
Aaron, Robyn Gray, Grace Regalado Sports: Chris Parks, 
Robert Rankin, Katelyn IVIunrean Copy Editing: Mlchele 
Straub, Nicole Bovaird, Adrienne Cain Advertising: Lauren 
Coucti, Courtney Krol, Jenna Peno, IVIike Smith Business: 
Sarah Sielski, Stephanie Corso, Shawn Turner, Ben Elliot 
Photography and Graphics: Bethany Ross, Mike Cauvel, 
Misha Snyder, Jenifer Poblete, Phil Dreiick, Thomas Fair 
Ctrailatlon: Eric Levy, Allison Kerr, Nicole Lawrence, John 
Blumer, Ryan Bridge, Bryan Bingham, Steve Cooper 

Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and obscen- 
ity; the determination of w/hich is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes {including PSAs) are published only based 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-currlcular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 

I Opinions expressed in this 
publication are tliose of t^e writer or speak- 
er, and do not necessarily reflect the opin- 
ions of the newspaper staff, student body, 
Clarion University or the community. 



Dark Side - There are 
month long horror festivals 
on TV, an increase of horror 
films at the theatres, and 
everyone you know sudden- 
ly has half a dozen scary sto- 
ries to tell. This isn't a 
sweetness and light event 
for everyone. Here is a holi- 
day with solid adult appeal. 
Most of the other holidays 
may peak for the under 15 
crowd but year after year 
Halloween wants those 
above that age to have a 
good time too. 

The bottom line is that 
Halloween is the holiday of 
creativity and freedom. It's 
an entire holiday devoted to 
the darker, rougher, and 
scarier side of life. 
Thanksgiving may be all 
about thankfulness and the 
harvest, the winter holidays 
may be all about the togeth- 
erness that comes with the 
snowy isolation and lethar- 
gy, and the spring holidays 
may be all about the rebirth 
of the world (bunnies and 
eggs!), but Halloween is 
about the creepy things that 
stalk the night and the dead 



walking among us. 
Halloween doesn't care if 
you are six or sixty. 
Halloween is here to taunt 
the edges of your vision with 
possibilities. Halloween is 
here for you. 

So what was that about 
Santa? You've noticed it too, 
1 am sure. He is creeping 
ahead further and further in 
the year. He swallowed up 
Thanksgiving (Black Friday 
anyone?) and is working on 
Halloween. Only we can 
stop his nefarious plot! 
Write your local stores, 
write the North Pole, take a 
stand against his oppres- 
sion! 

Or go run empty a few 
aerosol cans. I'm sure if we 
can kick this global warm- 
ing thing up a notch we 
could eliminate the "white 
Christmas" in a few years. 
Let's see that greedy bas- 
tard land his sled when the 
roof is bone dry and we are 
all kicking around in san- 
dals in December 

I promise I have no ulte- 
rior motives of making it 
eternal summer. Honest. 



Page 4 



THK CXAEION CALL 



October 5, 2006 



l/iii$B 



iiil, Mm III Ibe fldiliir and Tali iin liiu 



No such lack of entertainment in Clarion 



Dominic Giallombardo 

s_cljgiallomb®clarion.edu 

In last week's edition of 
The Clarion Call there was 
an story entitled "Lack of 
entertainment in Clarion". 

I'd just like to point out 
that there really is never a 
lack of things to do and 
ways to spend your time. 

Unfortunately, The UAB 
doesn't seem to be packing 
this year with as many 
events as they have in the 
past, but that shouldn't 
make a difference. I'd just 
like to point out a list of 15 
things that I find entertain- 




ing in Clarion. 

1. ALF: of course this is 
just once a year and only 
lasts about a week. But this 
is the best time to go run- 
ning around downtown, get 
some food, look at stuff and 
just hang out with your 
friends. 

2. The Dugout: Mini- 
Golf and Ice-cream. 

3. Bowling Alley: bowl- 
ing is an amazing way to 



spend time, and at the 
Clarion Bowling Alley, it's 
an amazing deal too 

4. Clubs: French, 
German, Math, History, 
Sociology, Clarion Young 
Democrats, Clarion 

University Young 

Republicans, Equestrian, 
whatever your taste there is 
a club or fraternities/sorori- 
ties: never ending supply of 
fun and activities 

6. Destinta Theatres: 
everyone loves movies, and 
at $3 everyone can afford to 
see the steamy new 
romance, or of course the 
blood-soaked gore fest. 

6. Clarion Mall: buying 



things is fun. 

7. Gemmell Movie 
Series: It doesn't matter 
how bad the movie, as long 
as its free. 

8. Intramural Sports. 

9. Theatre productions: 
even though it's no longer 
free, the Clarion Theatre 
Department is incredibly 
talented. 

10. Music Ensembles: 
Symphonic Band, Marching 
Band, Choir the list goes on 
forever. These are open to 
the general student body 
and count as credit towards 
graduation. 

11. Service: it is always 
good to help the community 



INTERNATIONAL CORNER 

Featuring Clarion students who studied abroad and students in Clarion from other nations. 



N 
M 

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U Ckmktsf ci origin: Sri Lanka "Pearl of the Indian Ocean" 

n 
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jj Interestiiig feet about your country: It has a history of 2,500 



and fortunately. Clarion 
offers hundreds of opportu- 
nities to get involved and 
help out. 

12. Cook Forest: not too 
far away, and you can get 
out there and get some fresh 
air. 

13. The River. 

14. Rec. Center. 

15. This list can go on 
and on, all you have to do is 
look for something to do and 
you'll find it. 

I'd also like to say that 
there is nothing wrong with 
spending time with your 
good old friend, Mr. 
Television. Also notice the 
lack of "reading" on this list 



as I stand by my claim that 
books are pure evil and 
should be stopped. 

There is not really a 
lack of entertainment in 
Clarion. I would have to say, 
however, that there is a lack 
of knowledge about this 
entertainment. I think that 
people should stop waiting 
for a something fun to find 
them and find something 
fun themselves. 

There are many things 
happening around campus 
and student participation is 
always wanted. 




Ravi Jayasena 



Cflass standing: Freshman, Master student (MBA). 
Mlpr. Business Management 



K 

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years and we have one of the best beaches in the world. Sri 
Lanka also has beautiful tropical forests and of course very 
friendly people! 

What brought you to Clarion?: I would say fate, but I really like 
the community of Clarion and the four seasons! 





■i-v * . ■■.•■'■-♦,-»■■ ■- 1 # 






"*.■■. 




' J, 



Saurava Pradhan 

CJountry of origin: Nepal. Arrived in Clarion August 2006. 

Majcn*: a Masters' in communication. 

Interesting Fact about your county: Nepal is popularly known as the 
Himalayan kingdom. Of the 10 highest peaks of the world, there are 
eight in Nepal, including Mt. Everest. Nepal is in South Asia and has 
a total land area of 56,136 sq.mi. Though small in size, it is diverse 
in every sense - flora, fauna, ethnicity, culture, language, religion, 
topography and so on. 

What brought you to Clarion?: The communication program that 
suits my professional needs. It has a good combination of theoretical 
base, management and application. Another reason I came to 
Clarion was because it is ranked among the safest universities in 
the United States. 



n 

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M 

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M 
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Calling all 
students! 

Writt an opinion 
plccafortht 

Icttcis * *' Witoi 
or for 




Let the student body know how 

you feel about a subject that h 

important to you or raise 

awareness about an 

occurrence that is overiooiced 

on campus on in the nation. 

Submissions are 
aNrays accepted! % 




*IIOT AU CUSTOMERS WIU QUAUFY. CUSTOMERS RECEIVE $400 FROW TOYOTA TOWARDS LEASING OR FINANCING THE PURCHASE OF NEW UNTITLED TOYOTA MODELS THROUGH PARTICIPATING TOYOTA 

DEALERS AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES SEE DEALER OR VISIT WWW.T0Y0TAFINANC1AL.COM/FINANCE FOR DETAILS. COLLEGE GRADUATE PROGRAM IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR TERMINATION AT ANY TIME 

^NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY. MAKING A PURCHASE DOES NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW TO ENTER YOU MUST BE A LEGAL U.S. RESIDENT AT LEAST 1 8 YEARS OLD 

AND YOU MUST HAVE A VAUD DRIVER'S LICENSE. VISIT YOUR PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALER OR WINAYARIS0NUNE.COM FOR COMPLETE ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS AND SWEEPSTAKES RULES 



October 5. 2006 



THE CLARION CALL 



Pages 



Ffitms 



Poorman's Candy Apples iiave a history beyond Clarion 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmonc)®clarion.edu 

In the small town of 
Clarion, the Autumn Leaf 
Festival serves as one week 
of entertainment, parties 
and food. 

Students, community 
members and touri.sts come 
out for the festivities by the 
thousands, and make sure 
they stop for some of the 
ever-popular carnival food. 

From elephant ears to 
wings to cheese fries, there's 
something for everyone from 
one of the many vendors 
along Main St. 

One of the most popular 
and atypical treats at the 
festival is the Poorman's 
Caramel Apple. 

This dessert is made 
from many different ingred;- 
ents^ a waffle bowl, vanilla 
ice cream with a chocolate 
shell, chopped apples, hot 
fudge, caramel sauce, 
assorted candy toppings of 
the customer's choice, a 
wafer stick and a cherry on 
top. 

It's no surprise that 



these indulgences are an 
Autumn Leaf staple. But. 
they have a history and a 
following that stretches far 
beyond Clarion. 

Ed Smitzer, part-owner 
of the DeLuca's explained 
that the apples are actually 
a familv tradition. 



When they were 
younger, they simply put the 
apple.s in a dish, then added 
the ice cream, then the waf- 
fle bowl and so on until they 
came with the product they 
have today. 

"We improve it and 
make it bigger every year," 







Shasta KurtVThe Clarion Call 
Enjoying a Poorman's Caramel Apple- Danielle Little, Luke 
Hampton and Deanna Solich enjoy a treat at the DeLuca ven- 
dor downtown. 



His partner's family 
diced the apples when they 
were younger and so began 
the dessert. 



Smitzer said. 

There were no changes 
this year, though. 

"We don't want to mess 



up a good thing." 

Over the years, they try 
to add or try something dif- 
ferent. Experiments with 
wafer sticks and different 
topping types are done to 
determine which are more 
preferable. 

According to Smitzer, 
the wafer sticks and Oreo, 
almond crunch and 
Butterfinger toppings are 
the most popular. 

Smitzer and his partner 
never count exactly how 
many caramel apples they 
sell, but they tour 60 events 
per year. They travel across 
the country, stopping at sev- 
eral states including 
Florida, Ohio and 

Massachusetts. 

He believes the caramel 
apples are so popular at 
A.L.F. "because of their size 
and they taste good." 



Sterner gives students a lesson on not drinking and driving 



Danielle Butcherine 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_dnbutcheri@clarion.edu 

On Tuesday Oct. 3 at 7 
p.m. in the Gemmell Multi- 
Purpose Room, Mark 
Sterner told Clarion stu- 
dents a true story about the 
dangers of drinking and 
driving. Sterner, whose 
presentation was sponsored 
by Greeks Advocating 
Mature Management of 
Alcohol (GAMMA), the 
Inter-Fraternity Council 
and the Panhellenic 
Council, relived his own 
experiences about why 
.drinking and driving is one 
of the worst mistakes any- 
one can make. 

Sterner began his pres- 
entation by asking the stu- 
dents in attendance if any- 
one had ever done some- 
thing "stupid" while drunk; 
if they had ever wondered 
how they had gotten home 
the night before? or if they 
had ever woken up next to 
someone and thought, 
"Damn, where'd they come 
from?" Although many of 
the students in the auditori- 
um answered yes to those 
questions, nobody could 
answer yes to Sterner's last 
question: "How many of you 
have ever driven while 
drunk and killed three of 
your best friends?" 

During Sterner's senior 
year of college, he and four 
friends traveled to Florida 



on their spring break. None 
of the five men had ever 
gone on that type of trip and 
wanted to have a good time. 

"We wanted to experi- 
ence a spring break like 
we'd seen on MTV," said 
Sterner. 

Their week started out 
the way many people imag- 
ine a spring break. However, 
things changed on the last 
night of their vacation. 

They wanted their last 
night to be the most memo- 
rable, so they decided to 
drink in their hotel room 
before going out for the 
evening. According to 
Sterner, the five gentlemen 
decided do shots and drink 
beer before going out to the 
bar for one last night on the 
town. 

Sterner said they want- 
ed to be responsible, so 
instead of driving to the 
bars that were a 35- to 40- 
minute drive away, they 
decided to stay in the gener- 
al area of their hotel room. 
They piled into their rented 
Lincoln Towncar and pro- 
ceeded to drive to the bar, at 
times hitting 100 mph on a 
road that had a speed limit 
of 35 mph. 

The five college seniors 
stopped at a bar located 
about 15 minutes from their 
hotel. Throughout their 
entire break, each person 
had acted as the designated 
driver for the evening. 
However, on this night, 
things changed. 



"Nobody wanted to miss 
the last night of Spring 
Break," said Sterner. 

After all five men con- 
tinued drinking at the bar, 
they argued for some time 
who was going to be the one 
to drive them all home. 

"We decided the least 
drunk person would drive," 
said Sterner. "That person 
was me. 1 got behind the 
wheel and off we went on 
the 1 5 minute drive home." 

The young men never 
made it back to their hotel 
room that evening. 
According to Sterner, the 
first thing he remembers is 
waking up a week later in 
the hospital, not knowing 
how he got there. 

"I had a neck brace, a 
back brace and had been 
restrained to the bed so I 
couldn't move," he said. 

Sterner then fell asleep 
again and did not wake up 
for another week. 

After Sterner woke up 
for the second time, he said 
a paramedic that arrived at 
the scene of the accident 
told him what happened. 
According to the paramedic, 
the car was traveling 
between 55 and 60 mph 
when the front tire of the 
car slid off the road. As 
Sterner tried to get the tire 
back on the road, the car 
went across the road and 
landed in a ditch. 

"The paramedic said the 
scene of the accident was 
200 yards long," said 



Sterner. 

As Sterner's brother 
later told him, at 3 a.m. 
after their last night out 
partying, his mother 
received a phone call at 
home from the hospital in 
Florida telling her to get 
there as soon as possible 
because they couldn't guar- 
antee her how much longer 
he'd be alive. According to 
Sterner, his family could not 
get to Florida until 12 hours 
after they first received the 
phone call. 

"They spent 12 hours 
not knowing if "d be alive or 
dead," he said. 

Sterner told the audi- 
ence his mother called the 
hospital every half hour 
until his family was able to 
leave for Florida. When his 
mother called at 6:30 a.m., 
she knew something was 
wrong. The nurse told his 
mother she could not prom- 
ise he would still be alive 
because he had stopped 
breathing on his own. 
Sterner said that after wak- 
ing up for the second time, 
he learned that three of his 
best friends had died as a 
result of the accident. 

"I wasn't thinking about 
police or trouble," said 
Sterner. "I was thinking 
about my friends that were 
dead. I was thinking, 'How 
was I going to live for the 
rest of my life?'" 

His mindset changed, 
though, when the police 
came to his hospital room. 



ASK€0Cr01im^£.2 



Dear Dr. Eagle, 

The Autumn Leaf Festival is this weekend. I know 
ther^ are a lot of parties the weekend of homecoming, but 
I am not intere,<itcd m drinking. My friends are all going 
out and they want me to come. How can I go out with 
them and still have fun while they are drinking? 
Signed, 
Drinkless 

Dear Drinkless, 

One can still go out and 
enjoy A.L.F. with friends 
without going to the parties. 
During the week there are 
events going on every night, 
including carnival rides and 
food. Suggest going down- 
town one night to have sortie 
fiitt. Kemembei^ A.L.F. is not 
just about partying. 

If your friends insist that 
you go to a party with them, 
you can offer to be the desig- 
nated driver. This gives you 
an opportunity to go out and 
have a good time without 
being pressured to drink. If 
the party becomes uncom' 
fortable and your friends are not ready to leave, make 
arrangements to pick them up when they are ready. 
Make sure if everyone remains in a group instead of any- 
one staying behind. 

Always stay in groups when going out Never leave a 
friend behind. Be careful walking down the strmta late 
at night and try to walk on well-lit streets. 

Overall tiy and make safe decisions when it comes 
to A.L.F. Remember there are plenty of other activities 
that do not involve drinking. 



Dt. Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson of the Keeling 
Health Center. For more information or to suggest a 
topic, e-mail her at s^smwilsoi^larion.edu. 




Sterner told the audience, 
"I was charged with three 
counts of DUI manslaugh- 
ter. The maximum sentence 
for this in Florida at the 
time was up to 45 years in 
prison." 

According to Sterner, 
the families of the young 
men killed while Sterner 
was behind the wheel did 
not want to see him spend 
the rest of his life in jail, so 
after going to trial, he was 
sentenced to three years in a 
Florida prison. After serving 
his three year jail sentence, 
he was given 12 years of 
probation. 

"If I make a mistake, I 
will go to jail for 45 years," 
said Sterner. 

Although it has been 
some time since the acci- 
dent. Sterner told the audi- 
ence he relives it every day. 

'There is an old saying 
that time heals all wounds," 
he said. "If you've ever lost 
someone close to you, you 
know that's not true." He 
later added, "It doesn't get 
easier, it doesn't change, 
and it doesn't go away." 

Sterner ended his pres- 
entation by asking those in 
attendance to always look 
out for their friends and to 



never make the mistake he 
did. 

"I don't do this cause it^ 
a part of my probation," he 
said. "I relive the worst 
night of my life so other peo- 
ple don't have to live with 
this." 

"Mark Sterner's presen- 
tation really made me sit 
there and think about the 
dangers of drinking and 
driving. Like he said during 
his speech, people seem to 
always think that things 
like that can't happen to 
them, but he proved that it's 
really dangerous to think 
this way. After sitting 
through this presentation, I 
will watch out for my 
friends a lot more than I 
already do," said Valerie 
Dixon, a junior accounting 
major. 

Colleen Rodgers, a jun- 
ior marketing major said, "I 
looked around the auditori- 
um while Mark was giving 
his presentation, and I 
hardly saw a dry eye in the 
whole room. I think a lot of 
people here are going to 
take his message with them. 
I know I will." 



Dr. Spina combines liumor and sincerity at poetry reading 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond@clarion.edu 

Opening this year's 
Spoken Art Reading Series 
was Clarion's very own Dr. 
Vincent Spina. He read a 
collection of his poetry in 
the University Art Gallery 
on Sept. 28. 

Spina has been writing 
since he was 15 years old. 
He said he was not always a 
big poet, but knew that he 
wanted to be a writer. 

A line in the last poem 
he read, called "About the 
Room," may have given 
some insight into his deci- 



sion to write poetry: "I heard 
girls get hot for poets." 

With many fellow pro- 
fessors and students in the 
audience, the Modern 
Languages professor opened 
with a poem titled "Laura," 
for First Lady Laura Bush. 

This poem included a bit 
of humor, just as many of 
his other ones did. "Open 
Injury," "Bad News" and 
"Pome" used a great deal of 
humor that evoked many 
chuckles from the audience. 

After reading about six 
poems, he looked to the 
audience and said, "I have a 
few you're actually going to 
understand." 

He followed with "Meet 
You at the Station." "One 



Went Out" and "About Your 
Mother." 

"About Your Mother" 
detailed a mother living in 
Brooklyn. Lots of details 
were used to describe the 
living conditions and the 
mother's personality. 

Another poem, "Ralph," 
opened with a song in 
Italian. "Tu scendi dale 
stelle" or "You come down 
from the stars" began a 
number of obviously cultur- 
al poems. 

Spina introduced the 
next set of pieces as ones he 
wrote about his stay in 
Ecuador. 

'This Grief presented a 
look at the Indian tradition 
of putting one's sorrow into 



a stone and placing it on a 
hill. He added many 
Spanish and Italian words 
into the English descrip- 
tions that gave a cultural 
feeling. 

Spina's use of detail and 
humor kept the audience 
intrigued. 

"Efficacy of this Poem" 
used the line, "Placing your 
hand in his/ but if he's actu- 
ally washed his after using 
the toilet." These types of 
lines were used quite often. 

Spina also read some 
poems that dealt with seri- 
ous and personal issues. 

"Survivor" presented a 
look into his own battle with 
cancer and his brother's 
struggle with AIDS. 



Another poem detailed 
the tumors he once had in 
his stomach. When intro- 
ducing it, he said he was 
thinking about the tumors 
so he decided to write about 
them. 

"The Winter's Almanac" 
seemed to have finished the 
reading, until the audience 
demanded an encore from 
the professor. So, he read 
one last poem to end the 
night. 

Spina's favorite time to 
write is in the morning, 
right after he wakes up. 

"I'm half asleep and the 
dreams mix with the real 
world. I just feel something 
and start writing," he said. 

He also pulls inspiration 



from some of his favorite 
poets. Cesar Vallejo was a 
Spanish poet that Spina 
believes "wrote touching 
poetry." Another one of his 
favorites is Walt Whitman. 

Currently, Spina is con- 
centrating on writing poet- 
ry- 

"I'm too old for the 
attention span to write 
short stories," he said. 

Spina has been pub- 
lished in numerous literary 
magazines, released the 
book, "El Mode Epico en 
Jose Luis Arguedas" and 
may have another one on 
the wav. 



i 



^ 



Page 4 



Tiffi CLARION CALL 



October 5, 2006 



Ifim 



KililiiiiiilJj'lim III llir fliii'iinil liill III) liiii 



No such lack of entertainment in Clarion 



Dominic Giallombardo 

s_djgiallomb@clarion.edu 

In last week's edition of 
The Clarion Call there was 
an story entitled "Ijack of 
entertainment in (Marion". 

I'd just like to point out 
that there really is never a 
lack of things to do and 
ways to spend your time. 

Unfortunately, The UAB 
doesn't seem to be packing 
this year with as many 
events as they have in the 
past, but that shouldn't 
make a difference. I'd just 
like to point out a list of 15 
things that 1 find entertain- 




ing in Clarion. 

1. ALF: of course this is 
just once a year and only 
lasts about a week. But this 
is the best time to go run- 
ning around downtown, get 
some food, look at stuff and 
just hang out with your 
friends. 

2. The Dugout: Mini- 
Golf and Ice-cream. 

3. Bowling Alley: bowl- 
ing is an amazing way to 



spend time, and at the 
Clarion Bowling Alley, it's 
an amazing deal too 

4. Clubs: French, 
(lerman. Math. History. 
Sociology. Clarion Young 
Democrats. Clarion 
University Young 
Republicans, Equestrian, 
whatever your taste there is 
a club or fraternitie.«i/sorori- 
ties: never enduig supply of 
fun and activities 

5. Destinta Theatres: 
everyone loves movies, and 
at $3 everyone can afford to 
see the steamy new 
romance, or of course the 
blood-soaked gore fest. 

6. Clarion Mall: buying 



things is fun. 

7. Gemmell Movie 
Series: It doesn't matter 
how bad the movie, as long 
as its free. 

H. Intramural Sports. 

9. Theatre productions: 
even though it's no longer 
free, the Clarion Theatre 
Department is incredibly 
talented. 

10. Music P^nsembles: 
Symphonic Band, Marching 
Band, Choir the list goes on 
forever These are open to 
the general student body 
and count as credit towards 
graduation. 

11. Service: it is always 
good to help the community 



and fortunately. Clarion 
offers hundreds of opportu- 
nities to get involved and 
help out. 

12. Cook Fore.st: not too 
far away, and you can get 
out there and get some fresh 
air. 

13. The River. 
11. Rec. Center. 

15. This list can go on 
and on, all you have to do is 
look for something to do and 
you'll find it. 

I'd also like to say that 
there is nothing wrong with 
spending time with your 
good old friend. Mr. 
Television. Also notice the 
lack of "reading" on this list 



as 1 stand by my claim that 
books are pure evil and 
should be stopped. 

There is not really a 
lack of entertainment in 
Clarion. 1 would have to say. 
however, that there is a lack 
of knowledge about this 
entertainment. I think that 
people should .stop waiting 
for a something fun to find 
them and find something 
fun themselves. 

There are many things 
happening around campus 
and student participation is 
alwavs wanted. 



tT 



INTERNATIONAL CORNER 

Featuring Clarion students who studied abroad and students in Clarion from other nations. 




: -fill '- ^ 



Ravi Jayasena 



Country of origin^ Sri Lanka "Pearl of the Indian Ocean" 

Class standing: Freshman, Master student (MBA). 

Major: Business Management 

Interesting fact about your country: It has a history of 2,500 
years and we have one of the best beaches in the world. Sri 
Lanka also has beautiful tropical forests and of course very 
friendly people! 

What brought you to Clarion?: I would say fate, but I really like 
the community of Clarion and the four seasons! 




Saurava Pradhan 

Country of origin: Nepal. Arrived in Clarion August 2006. 

Major: a Masters' in communication. 

Interesting Fact about your county: Nepal is popularly known as the 
Himalayan kingdom. Of the 10 highest peaks of the world, there are 
eight in Nepal, including Mt. Everest. Nepal is in South Asia and has 
a total land area of 56,136 sq.mi. Though small in size, it is diverse 
in every sense - flora, fauna, ethnicity, culture, language, religion, 
topography and so on. 

What brought you to Clarion?: The communication program that 
suits my professional needs. It has a good combination of theoretical 
base, management and application. Another reason I came to 
Clarion was because it is ranked among the safest universities in 
the United States. 



V 




Calling all 
students! 

Write an opinion 
piece for the 



IcKfis " ^ Iditci 




or for 



Let the student body know hovi 

you feel about a subject that l< 

important to you or raise 

awareness about an 

occurrence that is overlooked 

on campus on in the nation. 



Submissions are 
always accepted! 



?^^. 
a^p 




*NOT ALL CUSTOMERS Will OUAIIFY. CUSTOMERS RECEIVE $400 FROM TOYOTA TOWARDS LEASING OR FINANCING THE PURCHASE OF NEW UNTITLED TOYOTA MODELS THROUGH PARTICIPATING TOYOTA 

DEALERS AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES SEE DEALER OR VISIT WWW.TOYOTAFINANCIALXOM/FINANCE FOR DETAILS. COLLEGE GRADUATE PROGRAM IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR TERMINATION AT ANY TIME 

'NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY MAKING A PURCHASE DOES NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW TO ENTER YOU MUST BE A LEGAL U.S. RESIDENT AT LEAST 18 YEARS OLD 

AND YOU MUST HAVE A VALID DRIVER'S LICENSE. VISIT YOUR PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALER OR WINAYARIS0NLINE.COM FOR COMPLETE ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS AND SWEEPSTAKES RULES 



October 5, 2006 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



kitms 



Poorman's Candy Apples liave a history beyond Clarion 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s.sadesmond®clarion.edu 

In the small town of 
Clarion, the Autumn Loaf 
Festival servi's as one week 
of entertainment, parties 
and food. 

Students, community 
members and tourists come 
out for the festivities by the 
thousands, and make sure 
they stop for some of the 
ever-popular carnival food. 

From elephant ears to 
winfjs to cheese fries, there's 
something for everyone from 
one of the many vendors 
along Main St. 

One of the most popular 
and atypical treats at the 
festival is the Poorman's 
Caramel .Apple. 

This dessert is made 
from many different ingred'.- 
ents: a waffle bowl, vanilla 
ice cream with a chocolate 
shell, chopped apples, hot 
fudge, caramel sauce, 
assorted candy toppings of 
the customer's choice, a 
wafer .stick and a cherry on 
top. 

It's no surprise that 



these indulgences are an 
.Autumn Leaf staple, liut, 
they have a history and a 
following that stretches far 
bevond Clarion. 



When they were 
younger, they simply put the 
apples in a dish, then added 
the ici' cream, then the waf- 
fle bowl and so on until thev 



Kd Smit/er, part owner came with the product they 

of the DeLuca's explained have tochiy. 
that the apples are actually "We improve it and 

a faniilv tradition. make it bigger every year." 





Shasta Kurtz/Tfie Clarion Call 
Enjoying a Poorman's Caramel Apple Danielle Little, Luke 
Hampton and Deanna Solich enjoy a treat at the DeLuca ven- 
dor downtown. 

His partner's family Smitzer said, 
diced the apples when they There were no changes 

were younger and so began this year, though. 
the dessert. "We don't want to mess 



u|) a good thing." 

Over the years, they try 
to add or try something dif- 
ferent. Experiments with 
wafer sticks and different 
topping types are done to 
determine which are more 
preferable. 

.According to Smitzer. 
the wafer sticks and Oreo, 
almond crunch and 
Butterfinger toppings are 
the most popular. 

Smitzer and his partner 
never count exactly how 
many caramel apples they 
sell, but they tour 60 events 
per year. They travel across 
the country, stopping at sev- 
eral states including 
Florida, Ohio and 

Massachusetts. 

He believes the caramel 
apples are so popular at 
A.L.F'. "because of their size 
and they taste good." 



Sterner gives students a lesson on not drinking and driving 



Danielle Butcherine 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_dnbutcheri@clarion.edu 

On Tuesday Oct. 3 at 7 
p.m. in the Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room. Mark 
Sterner told Clarion stu- 
dents a true story about the 
dangers of drinking and 
driving. Sterner, whose 
presentation was sponsored 
by Ci reeks Advocating 
Mature Management of 
Alcohol (GAMMA), the 
Inter- Fraternity Council 
and the Panhellenic 
Council, relived his own 
experiences about why 
. diinking and driving is one 
of the worst mistakes any- 
one can make. 

Sterner began his pres- 
entation by asking the stu- 
dents in attendance if any- 
one had ever done some- 
thing "stupid" while drunk: 
if they had ever wondered 
how they had gotten home 
the night before: or if they 
had ever woken up next to 
someone and thought. 
"Damn, where'd they come 
from?" Although many of 
the students in the auditori- 
um answered yes to those 
questions, nobody could 
answer yes to Sterner's last 
question: "How many of you 
have ever driven while 
drunk and killed three of 
your best friends?" 

During Sterner's senior 
year of college, he and four 
friends traveled to Florida 



on their spring break. None 
of the five men had ever 
gone on that type of trip and 
wanted to have a good time. 

"We wanted to experi- 
ence a spring break like 
we'd seen on MTV." said 
Sterner. 

Their week started out 
the way many people imag- 
ine a spring break. However, 
things changed on the last 
night of their vacation. 

They wanted their last 
night to be the most memo- 
rable, so they decided to 
drink in their hotel room 
before going out for the 
evening. According to 
Sterner, the five gentlemen 
decided do shots and drink 
beer before going out to the 
bar for one last night on the 
town. 

Sterner said they want- 
ed to be responsible, so 
instead of driving to the 
bars that were a 35- to 10- 
minute drive away, they 
decided to stay in the gener- 
al area of their hotel room. 
They piled into their rented 
Lincoln Towncar and pro- 
ceeded to drive to the bar. at 
times hitting 100 mph on a 
road that had a speed limit 
of 35 mph. 

The five college seniors 
stopped at a bar located 
about 15 minutes from their 
hotel. Throughout their 
entire break, each person 
had acted as the designated 
driver for the evening. 
However, on this night, 
things changed. 



"Nobody wanted to miss 
the last night of Spring 
Break." said Sterner 

.Aftei- all five men con- 
tinued drinking at the bar. 
they argued for some time 
who was going to be the one 
to drive them all home. 

"We decided the least 
drunk per.^on would drive," 
said Sterner. "That person 
was me. 1 got behind the 
wheel and off we went on 
the 15 minute drive home." 

The young men never 
made it back to their hotel 
room that evening. 

According to Sterner, the 
first thing he remembers is 
waking up a week later in 
the hospital, not knowing 
how he got there. 

"I had a neck brace, a 
back brace and had been 
restrained to the bed so 1 
couldn't move," he said. 

Sterner then fell asleep 
again and did not wake up 
for another week. 

.After Sterner woke up 
for the second time, he said 
a paramedic that arrived at 
the scene of the accident 
told him what happened. 
According to the paramedic, 
the car was traveling 
between 55 and 60 mph 
when the front tire of the 
car slid off the road. As 
Sterner tried to get the tire 
back on the road, the car 
went across the road and 
landed in a ditch. 

"The paramedic said the 
.scene of the accident was 
200 yards long." said 



Sterner. 

As Sterner's brother 
later told him, at 3 a.m. 
after their last night out 
partying. his mother 
received a phone call at 
home from the hospital in 
Florida telling her to get 
there as soon as possible 
because they couldn't guar- 
antee her how much longer 
he'd be alive. According to 
Sterner, his family could not 
get to Florida until 12 hours 
after they first received the 
phone call. 

"They spent 12 hours 
not knowing if "d be alive or 
dead," he said. 

Sterner told the audi- 
ence his mother called the 
hospital every half hour 
until his family was able to 
leave for F'lorida. When his 
mother called at 6:30 a.m., 
she knew something was 
wrong. The nurse told his 
mother she could not prom- 
ise he would still be alive 
because he had stopped 
breathing on his own. 
Sterner said that after wak- 
ing up for the second time, 
he learned that three of his 
best friends had died as a 
result of the accident. 

"I wasn't thinking about 
police or trouble," said 
Sterner. "I was thinking 
about my friends that were 
dead. 1 was thinking. "How 
was I going to live for the 
rest of my life?'" 

His mindset changed, 
though, when the police 
came to his hospital room. 



A^xvocronmciU'E 



Dear Dr. Eagle. 

The Autun^n Leaf Fei<tiviil is this wevkend. I know 
there are n lot of parties the weekend of homecoming, but 
I am not interested in drinking. My friends are all going 
out and they want me to come. How can I go out with 
them and still have fun while they are drinking? 
Signed, 
Drinkless 

Dear Drinkless. 

One can still go out and 
enjoy A.L.F. with friends 
without going to the parties. 
During the week there are 
events going on every night, 
including carnival rides and 
food. Suggest going down- 
town one night to have some 
fun. Remember- A.L.F. is not 
just about partying. 

If your friends insist that 
you go to a party with them, 
you can offer to be the desig- 
nated driver. This gives you 
an opportunity to go out and 
have a good time without 
being pressured to drink. If 
the party becomes uncom- 
fortable and your friends are not ready to leave, make 
arrangements to pick them up when they are ready. 
Make sure if everyone remains in a group instead of any- 
one staying behind. 

Always stay in groups when going out. Never leave a 
friend behind. Be careful walking down the streets late 
at night and try to walk on welllit streets. 

Overall, try and make safe decisions when it comes 
to A.L.F. Remember there are plenty of other activities 
that do not involve drinking. 



Dr. Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson of the Keeling 
Health Center. For more information or to suggest a 
topic, e-mail her at s__smwilson(li^clarion.edu. 




Sterner told the audience, 
"I was charged with three 
counts of DUl manslaugh- 
ter. The maximum sentence 
for thi.*^ in Florida at the 
time was up to 45 years in 
prison." 

According to Sterner, 
the families of the young 
men killed while Sterner 
was behind the wheel did 
not want to see him spend 
the rest of his life in jail, so 
after going to trial, he was 
sentenced to three years in a 
Florida prison. After serving 
his three year jail sentence, 
he was given 12 years of 
probation. 

"If I make a mistake, 1 
will go to jail for 45 years," 
said Sterner. 

.Although it has been 
some time since the acci- 
dent. Sterner told the audi- 
ence he relives it every day. 

"There is an old saying 
that time heals all wounds." 
he said, 'if you've ever lost 
someone close to you, you 
know that's not true." He 
later added. "It doesn't get 
easier, it doesn't change, 
and it doesn't go away." 

Sterner ended his pres- 
entation by asking those in 
attendance to always look 
out for their friends and to 



never make the mistake he 
did. 

"I don't do this cause it's 
a part of my probation," he 
said. "I relive the worst 
night of my life so other peo- 
ple don't have to live with 
this." 

"Mark Sterner's presen- 
tation really made me sit 
there and think about the 
dangers of drinking and 
driving. Like he said during 
his speech, people seem to 
always think that things 
like that can't happen to 
them, but he proved that it's 
really dangerous to think 
this way. After sitting 
through this presentation, I 
will watch out for my 
friends a lot more than I 
already do," said Valerie 
Dixon, a junior accounting 
major. 

Colleen Rodgers, a jun- 
ior marketing major said, "I 
looked around the auditori- 
um while Mark was giving 
his presentation, and I 
hardly saw a dry eye in the 
whole room. 1 think a lot of 
people here are going to 
take his message with them. 
1 know I will." 



Dr. Spina combines iiumor and sincerity at poetry reading 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond@clarJon.edu 

Opening this year's 
Spoken Art Reading Series 
was Clarion's very own Dr. 
Vincent Spina. He read a 
collection of his poetry in 
the University Art Gallery 
on Sept. 28. 

Spina has been writing 
since he was 15 years old. 
He said he was not always a 
big poet, but knew that he 
wanted to be a writer. 

A line in the last poem 
he read, called "About the 
Room," may have given 
some insight into his deci- 



sion to write poetry: "I heard 
girls get hot for poets." 

With many fellow pro- 
fessors and students in the 
audience. the Modern 
Languages professor opened 
with a poem titled "Laura," 
for First Lady Laura Bush. 

This poem included a bit 
of humor, just as many of 
his other ones did. "Open 
Injury." "Bad News" and 
"Poine" used a great deal of 
humor that evoked many 
chuckles from the audience. 

After reading about six 
poems, he looked to the 
audience and said. "I have a 
few you're actually going to 
understand." 

He followed with "Meet 
You at the Station." "One 



Went Out" and ".About Your 
Mother." 

"About Your Mother" 
detailed a mother living in 
Brooklyn, f^ots of details 
were u.sed to describe the 
living conditions and the 
mother's personality. 

.Another poem, "Ralph." 
opened with a song in 
Italian. "Tu scendi dale 
stelle" or "You come down 
from the stars" began a 
number of obviously cultur- 
al poems. 

Spina introduced the 
next set of pieces as ones he 
wrote about his stay in 
Ecuador. 

"This Grief presented a 
look at the Indian tradition 
of putting one's sorrow into 



a stone and placing it on a 
hill. He added many 
Spanish and Italian words 
into the F^nglish descrip- 
tions that gave a cultural 
feeling. 

Spina's use of detail and 
humor kept the audience 
intrigued. 

"Fjfficacy of this Poem" 
used the line. "Placing your 
hand in his/ but if he's actu- 
ally washed his after using 
the toilet." These types of 
lines were used quite often. 

Spina also read some 
poems that dealt with seri- 
ous and personal issues. 

"Survivor" presented a 
look into his own battle with 
cancer and his brother's 
struggle with .AIDS. 



.Another poem detailed 
the tumors he once had in 
his stomach. When intro- 
ducing it. he said he was 
thinking about the tumors 
so he decided to write about 
them. 

"The Winter's Almanac" 
seemed to have finished the 
reading, until the audience 
demanded an encore from 
the professor. So. he read 
one last poem to end the 
night. 

Spina's favorite time to 
write is in the morning, 
right after he wakes up. 

"I'm half asleep and the 
dreams mix with the real 
world. I just feel something 
and start writing." he said. 

He also pulls inspiration 



from some of his favorite 
poets. Cesar Vallejo was a 
Spanish poet that Spina 
believes "wrote touching 
poetry." Another one of his 
favorites is Walt Whitman. 

Currently, Spina is con- 
centrating on writing poet- 
r\-. 

"I'm too old for the 
attention span to write 
.short stories," he said. 

Spina has been pub- 
lished in numerous literary 
magazines, released the 
book. "El Modo Epico en 
Jose Luis Arguedas" and 
may have another one on 
the way. 



Pages 



Eitertiiutfit 



Tiffi ^a^maoN CALL 



October 5, 2006 



Autumn Leaf Festival officially begins 



Grace Regalado 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gvregalado®clario(i>3du 

CLARION, Oct. 5 -^ Clarion 
County's Autumn Leaf 
Festival always hits high 
with the students from 
Clarion University. The 
trees around the area 
change colors from a beauti- 
ful green tone to its extrava- 
gant autumn shades of reds 
and oranges. 

A.L.F. is a weeklong 
hometown festival and cele- 
bration which began 
Sunday evening with a dis- 
play of fireworks set off 
above the stadium. 

Alumni come back to 
gather, and for occurring 
students, A.L.F. is always a 
first-rate excuse for a week 
long party, especially if hav- 
ing a test in every class dur- 
ing this week. 

This year's A.L.F., spon- 
sored by National City 
Bank, is the 53rd annual. 



Monday. October 2 at 
approximately 6:20 p.m. 
marked the beginning of the 
12th anniversary of 
Cultural Night in the 
Clarion County Community, 
brought to you by Clarion 
University and Clarion 
County. 

Cultural Night started 
with a traditional welcome 
from Joseph Grunenwald, 
President of Clarion 
University. He had thanked 
everyone for coming out to 
start the week right at 
A.L.F., introduced sponsors 
and board members for their 
fine job in sponsorship and 
exhibiting his gratitude for 
their help and participation. 

There were also special 
thanks towards Beverly 
Healthcare. Clarion County 
Council Members, Clarion 
Borough Staff and chamber 
members such as C93. 
Clarion's hit music station. 
Pepsi and Clarion 

University. 

One of the MCs of the 




Attention Harry Potter fans 

A Georgia woman, Laura Mallory, filed an applica- 
tion with the Board of Education to put a ban on all 
Harry Potter books. Mallory beUeves that these books 
try to persuade children to perform witchcraft. 

The Board of Education attorney. Victoria Sweeny, 
stated that if witchcraft is to be removed from schools 
then classics such as "Macbeth" and "Cinderella" will be 
gone as well. 

- Sarah Dent 



Madonna adopts baby boy 

On Wednesday, Oct. 4, Madonna adopted a one- 
yearold baby boy from Malawi. Although she only 
adopted one child, she plays to fund a center for approx- 
imately 1,000 orphans whose parents have died from 
AIDS in Mphandula. The children will be taught a cur- 
riculum related to Kabbalah. 

Madonna plans to spend $3 million on programs 
supporting the orphans and another $1 million for a 
documentary on the children in the country. 

- Sarah Dent 



Underwater concert earns record 

Katie Melua performed a concert 994 feet under the 
North Sea. The underwater affair earned Melua a spot 
in The Guineas Book of World Records. 

Melua, who is from Georgia and is of Irish descent, 
performed two concerts for a group of offshore oil work- 
ers on an oil platform, which is owned by Sta toil ASA, a 
Noi-weigian oil company. 

The official record that Melua holds is "The world's 
deepest underwater concert performed in front of an 
audience." 

- Sarah Dent 



''New" Beatles album to be released 

A "new" Beatles album is set to be released in 
November. This will be the Beatles' first album in over 
two decades. 

Although the group is no longer together, producer 
George Martin and his son, Giles, have permission 
from Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and the wives of 
John Lennon and George Harrison. 

The songs that are going to be on the album were 
originally designed for the "Love" show in Las Vegas. 

One example of a song is Harrison's "Within 
Without You" being played to "Tbmorrow Never 
Knows" drum-track. 

- Sarah Dent 



Most requested funeral songs 

The number one most requested funeral song in 
the United Kingdom is James Blunt's "Goodbye My 
Lover." 

The second most requested song is Robbie 
Williams' "Angel." 

In third place is "Ive Had the Time of My Life" by 
Jennifer Warnea and Bill Medley. 

Other songs include "Wind Beneath My Wings" by 
Bett« Midler, 'Tears in Heaven " by Eric Clapton and 
"With or Without You" by U2. 

- Sarah Dent 



night. Ashley Walker, had 
said, 'This is the 12th annu- 
al Cultural Nights, it's the 
main kickoff and we have 
many sponsors. The Clarion 
International Association 
also holds a fashion show 
which is continual." 

Other MCs of the night 
were Brad Solyan and 
Rachel Graham, Manager of 
the Social Equity Office. 

Monday night also held 



performances from a 
Pittsburgh based blues 
band, Jill West and the 
Blues Attack, who opened 
up after the commencement. 

Also, Jeffrey Michael 
Lloyd, a country gospel 
singer hit the stage that 
evening, along with Clarion- 
Limestone Sensations and 
Dancers. 

Aside from a little driz- 
zle earlier that afternoon, 






^. -feV 












Shasta Kuttt/The Clarion Call 
Pretty Colors - The fireworks on Sunday Oct. 1st marked the 
beginning of Autumn Leaf Festival. 



kickoff for the 12th Annual 
Clarion County Cultural 
Community Night had a 
pretty decent turnout. 

The night started off 
with an undersized crowd of 
folks who were there for the 
carnival food atmosphere 
and few migrated around to 
listen to Grunenwald in the 
beginning. 

As the night evolved, 
more and more had gath- 
ered around to hear the 
musical Christian sounds of 
Lloyd and the down-to-earth 
beat of West and the Blues 
Attack. 

Amanda Lehew, a junior 
speech pathology major, 
said, "It was a nice gather- 
ing of people who all came 
out there for one reason: the 
enjoyment of music. And of 
course, who would pass up 
the food!" 

Tuesday at approxi- 
mately 6:30 p.m. there was 
performance by Eugene and 
the Nightcrawlers, a blues 
and rock band from Butler. 



On Wednesday at 6 
p.m. Ambridge School's steel 
drum ensemble played. 

Thursday, October 5th 
at 5 p.m. was a show by a 
jazz quartet from 

Pittsburgh, Spirit on the 
Hill. 

Friday at 11 a.m. during 
the craft show. Grant 
Thompson from Grove City 
will be playing his key- 
boards. 

Saturday morning there 
will be the annual A.L.F. 
parade, which is scheduled 
to begin at noon and will be 
going down Main Street 
towards the stadium. The 
parade will feature floats 
from numerous organiza- 
tions on campus. 

So take a break from 
studying and check out 
some of the bands or come 
get a funnel cake and cele- 
brate the 53rd annual A.L.F. 



"Black Dahlia" was not what I expected 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_sedent@clarion.eclu 




"The Black Dahlia" 
Director: Brian De Palma 
Rating: 3/5 



CLARION, Oct. 5 - Friday 
nights are my date night 
with my boyfriend. We go to 
dinner and a movie, or 
sometimes we cook in and 
take a trip to Blockbuster. 

This past Friday con- 
sisted of dinner at Don 
Pablo's, shopping for my 
upcoming birthday and 
going to see "The Black 
Dahlia." We had been anx- 
iously awaiting the release 
of the movie, but due to the 
hype, we waited a few weeks 
before going. 

Well, let me start out by 
saying the hype... was all for 
nothing. The previews were 
a tease, nothing more, noth- 
ing less. 

The movie features 



Dwight "Bucky" Bleichert 
(Josh Hartnett) and Lee 
Blanchard (Aaron Eckhart) 
as ex-boxers turned detec- 
tives. Their athletic ability 
is used for political purpose 
in a boxing match (Mr. Fire 
vs. Mr. Ice) to get support 
for a Bond Act. The men are 
given numerous big cases 
and are eventually assigned 
to the "Black Dahlia" mur- 
der investigation, even 
though they were already on 
a case when the murder 
occurred. The poor woman, 
Elizabeth "Betty" Short 
(Mia Kirshner), had been 
cut in half, her cheeks sliced 
and numerous other things 
done to her poor dead body. 

Bleichart and 

Blanchard spend almost 
every waking moment 
together and a lot of their 
time is spent with 
Blanchard's love interest 
Kay Lake (Scarlett 
Johansson). Although Lake 
shows more interest in 
Bleichart than her 
boyfriend, Bleichart politely 
declines. 

The murder investiga- 
tion takes Bleichart to a les- 
bian night club where he 
meets Madeleine Linscott 
(Hilary Swank). Bleichart 
and Linscott begin a steamy 
relationship filled with tons 
of drama. 

Throughout the rest of 
the movie, Bleichart bal- 
ances his secret love for 
Lake and his pure lust for 
Linscott. 



Secrets are revealed in 
regards to Blanchard's 
childhood. Lake's old 
lifestyles and Linscott's fam- 
ily. These secrets change 
Bleichart's perspective of 
each of these people, but not 
drastically. 

The one thing that both- 
ered me more than anything 
was that in reality, the mur- 
der case is unsolved, but in 
the movie, Bleichart solves 
the case. What is up with 
that? Why can't we just be 
told that it was unsolved? 




Why frame a fictional char- 
acter? 

Anyways, for the most 
part, I thought this movie 
was awful. The few minor 
parts that related to the 
actual case, and not to 
Bleichart's love interests, 
were fantastic. 

I thought that this was 
going to have a "Law & 
Order," "CSI" kind of theme 
to it. Boy, was I wrong! 

I love murder mysteries, 
investigations and every- 
thing involved in them. 
That is exactly why I was so 



anxious to see this movie. I 
really didn't plan on going to 
see the movie and having to 
watch Bleichart sleep with 
everything that walks. Yes, I 
do believe that the love tri- 
angle was interesting, but 
that was the main focus of 
the story for awhile there 
and it shouldn't have been. 

Now, don't get me 
wrong. Hartnett is a beauti- 
ful creature who I do not 
mind seeing with his shirt 
off or starring at his butt 
(yes ladies, we do see his 
butt), but quite frankly, if I 
want to see a movie about 
his love life, I'll go ^ee a 
romance movie. 

I went expecting a mys- 
tery-thriller movie and what 
I got was a little bit of mys- 
ter, an even tinier bit of 
thriller and a lot of romance. 

I went to this movie 
with five people, and four of 
the five said it was awful. 
The fifth, well I guess 
there's really no excuse for 
him except that he's weird. 

Overall, I gave this 
movie three out of five. The 
three is because the parts 
about the murder mystery 
itself were good and I liked 
seeing Hartnett's butt 
(which is worth two points 
by itself). 

The movie couldVe been 
drastically different. It 
would've been a thousand 
times better if it had been 
based on the murder and 
not the love triangle. 



NBC'S "Friday Night Ligiits" is biinded by tiie iiglit 



Paul Brownfield 
Los Angeles Times 

HOLLYWOOD - NBC's 

"Friday Night Lights," 
which premiered Tuesday 
night, is like a small-town 
student-body presidential 
race financed by Hollywood 
money. It's a music video, 
really, twice removed from 
the backdrop that gave H.G. 
Bissinger the terrain for his 
1988 book - a dusty, racial- 
ly troubled west Texas oil 
town united by its outsized 
passion for the Odessa 
Permian High School foot- 
ball team. 

Peter Berg, who direct- 
ed the 2004 movie version, 
is co-executive producer of 
"Friday Night Lights" the 
series, and he seems to have 
decided that the show would 
only work if story telling 



were pared down to quick- 
cutting iconography set to 
guitars. 

We bounce from tableau 
to tableau - the coach 
watching game footage in 
his Uving room, the players 
with their girls and their 
beers by the barbecue, the 
pep rally at the car dealer- 
ship where the dragon- lady 
mayor corners the star 
quarterback while another 
asks the running back: 
"Have you ever blitzed an 
older woman?" 

They're tantalizing 
brush strokes. "Friday 
Night Lights" the movie had 
this stylized, documentary 
feel too, but it also had the 
half-mad Billy Bob 
Thornton: you thought he 
might be capable of hitting a 
kid, or at least saying some- 
thing incredibly mean. Ditto 
Coach Rush Propst on 



MTV's involving "Two-a- 
Days," a reality series about 
the Hoover High football 
team in Alabama. 

"The main thing you 
need to do, let me tell you 
what you need to do - you 
need to shut up," Coach 
Propst told his star defen- 
sive lineman Repete Smith 
on a recent episode, after 
Repete was caught flirting 
with the opposing team's 
cheerleaders during a game. 

The coach on "Friday 
Night Lights" is played by 
the handsome Kyle 
Chandler, who wears his 
weary, soulful gaze like a 
headset sponsored by the 
makers of an antidepres- 
sant. Chandler's the new 
coach of the Dillon High 
Panthers (changed from the 
Permian Panthers of 
Odessa), on whose teenage 
shoulder pads rest a town's 



hopes and dreams. 

The subtitle of 
Bissinger's book was "A 
Town, a Team and a 
Dream," because it was 
partly about the socioeco- 
nomics out of which "Mojo" 
mania grew, but the TV 
show shortens things to just 
the team and the dream. 

"I'm starting to look at 
this whole damn town like a 
big ol' out-tune guitar," the 
backup quarterback's best 
friend says of one-horse 
Dillon. It sounds like a line 
he might have stolen from a 
Willie Nelson tune. The 
NBC release calls it ''the 
small, rural town of Dillon," 
which is TV exec-speak for 
any place in America you 
can't get to by direct flight. 

See "Friday Night 
Lights" on page 7. 



October 5, 2006 



Hffi CLASION CALL 



Page 7 



DiFranco tells the truth about the world In song 



Emily Aaron 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s emaaronOclarlon.edu 




"Reprive" 

Performer: Ani DiFranco 

Rating: 5/5 



CLARION Oct. 5 - Ani 
DiFranco is a singer/song- 
writer/guitarist. Her new 
album, "Reprive," is in 
stores now. This album was 
done in her New Orleans 



studio in early 2005 while 
she was on a break from 
touring. 

The first thing I noticed 
about DiFranco's music was 
that at the beginning of 
each song there's a long gui- 
tar solo before she starts 
singing. She has a very 
inspiring voice and I could 
tell how much she really 
enjoys her music. 

In the first track of the 
album, "Hypnotized," she 
starts out with playing her 
guitar for two minutes 
before she began singing. 
With this song, she goes on 
to discuss how just because 
you aren't a "super model" 
does not mean you won't 
attract someone. This part 
of the song shows that: 
"...so that's how you found 
me. Rain falling around me 
looking down at a worm, 
with a long way to go." 

DiFranco's insert to her 
CD was one of the best parts 
about her album. 1 love the 



abstract art that she put 
with the lyrics to each song. 
The pictures go along with 
what she is singing about. 
One song talks about water 
and with that she has a pic- 
ture of the ocean. This 
makes the CD stick out to 
the listeners. 

"Nicotine" is the second 
track to her CD. This song 
is very intriguing. It dis- 
cusses how much you can 
hate someone, but at the 
same time love them and 
want to be with them more 
than anything. There were 
two lines in the song that 
stuck out the most to me: "I 
hate you sometimes, but I 
love to be your queen...." 
and "I watch you sometimes 
from oh so far away, but I 
can't forget you or anything 
you say..." 1 bet most people 
have also felt this way about 
someone. 

Track seven, 

"Millennium Theater," is 
another good song on the 




CD. It talks about different 
things that have happened 
in the world and discusses 
all the negative things that 
happen with the politics and 
what has happened in the 
21st Century. 

"...Halliburton, Enron, chief 
justices for sale, yucca 
mountain goddesses, their 
tears they form a trail. 
Trickle down pollution. 
Patriarchies realign while 
the ice caps melt and New 
Orleans bides her time..." 
The weird part about this 



song is it was written before 
Hurricane Katrina hit New 
Orleans. It is about some- 
thing else that was happen- 
ing there. 

"Reprieve," the title 
track of the album really 
stuck out because she did 
not sing any of it. She spoke 
it very softly and seriously. 

The song deals with 
feminism and why women 
should stick up for them- 
selves. How they should not 
split themselves in two for 
anyone no matter what. 
She goes very in depth with 
tlie song and sings some 
parts of it with anger. 

One specific part of the 
song that caught my atten- 
tion when 1 was listening to 
her was, "...to split yourself 
in two, is just the most radi- 
cal thing you can do. So girl 
if that shit ain't up to you 
then you simply aren't free 
cuz from the sunlight on my 
hair to which eggs 1 grow to 
term. To the expression that 



I wear all I really own is 
me..." This part of the song 
was very inspiring and true. 
No one should let someone 
run them. You live for your- 
self and that's what she's 
trying to express in her 
.songs. 

Overall, I really enjoyed 
the CD and it is actually 
something that I would lis- 
ten to and may purchase a 
copy for myself. Just the 
way she sang made me 
enjoy the music and all the 
important topics that she 
discussed. We never really 
hear that anymore, and it 
was nice to finally hear 
someone singing about 
things that are actually tak- 
ing place in the world. 

1 suggest that everyone 
listen to this CD. It will 
make you think a little more 
about the world around us. 



Sparks strikes again witii romance 



Robyn Gray 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rlgray@clarion.edu 




"The Wedding" 
Author: Nicholas Sparks 
Rating: 5/5 



CLARION, Oct. 5 - Many 
have heard of Nicholas 
Sparks, due to the movie 
"The Notebook," which won 
over the hearts of many 
women of all ages. He is a #1 
New York Times bestseller 
and authored the book that 



the movie was based upon. 

Sparks has also written 
many other bestsellers and 
great novels. A few exam- 
ples of the books that he has 
written are: "Message in a 
Bottle," "A Walk to 
Remember," "Nights in 
Rodanthe" and "The 
Wedding." 

1 recently had the 
chance to sit down and enjoy 
The Wedding," the follow- 
up to "The Notebook." 
Someone had told me I 
would enjoy it, some said it 
was dry and some said it 
was too drawn out. I found 
that most opinions were 
wrong. 

This book was amazing- 
ly well written, as most of 
Sparks' books are, but it 
drew me in like none other. I 
found myself sitting for 
hours not able to put it 
down until I found out what 
would happen next. 

The book is based upon 
Wilson Lewis, a man in his 
fifties, is the son-in-law of 
Allie and Noah Calhoun of 



"The Notebook." Wilson 
feels as if his marriage is 
falling apart. He feels that 
the romance has completely 
disappeared through the 
birth and upbringing of 
their three children and his 
incessant days at the office. 
He feels that even his chil- 
dren have grown distant 
from him and it is entirely 
his fault. He realizes he has 
become a workaholic and 
put his job in front of his 
family. 

Wilson, who has been 
married to Jane for 30 
years, still feels as if she is 
the most gorgeous woman. 
He tells the reader every lit- 
tle thing he loves and adores 
about her, but fails to tell 
.Jane that. He realizes if he 
would only say what's on his 
mind and act upon it, things 
would not have to be the 
way they are. 

Wilson devises a plan to 
win Jane's love back. He 
feels that he will have to try 
to make her fall in love with 
him all over. He takes a 



week off of work, cooks her 
exquisite dinners, starts 
exercising everyday and 
more. 

He goes to many 
extremes but he is content 
that Jane is noticing he is 
trying. Just when he asks 
Jane to go away on a little 
vacation together while they 




have the time, their daugh- 
ter, Anna, announces that 
she is getting married and 
wants to have the ceremony 
in a week. 

Just as any other moth- 
er would, Jane gets swept 
up in the whole thing and 
helps Anna have the best 



possible wedding. At first, 
Wilson is discouraged and 
feels that Anna has hin- 
dered his whole plan, but 
instead, he jumps right in 
and helps with the wedding 
situation. 

Wilson uses the shining 
example of his in-laws 
romance to guide him back 
into Jane's heart. Wilson is 
sure of one thing; his love 
for his wife has only deep- 
ened and intensified over 
the 30 long years. There are 
nights that Wilson notices 
that Jane is appreciating 
the change he is making, 
and there are nights that 
Wilson feels Jane really will 
never feel the same way 
again. Nevertheless, he 
doesn't give up. 

Will the wedding be a 
total fiasco and not come 
together greatly? Will 
Wilson be wasting his time, 
as Jane may never fall back 
in love with him? Will 
Wilson and Jane rekindle 
their romance looking upon 
the examples of Noah and 



Allie, and now their daugh- 
ter and her husband's? 
You'll have to pick up this 
bestseller to find out. 

This book will change 
your perceptions for the bet- 
ter. It really showed me that 
guys do have hearts and 
compassion, contrary to pop- 
ular belief. It also showed 
me how powerful love is and 
what some will do just to get 
it back in their lives. 

Sparks writes excep- 
tionally well and lures the 
reader in to the point at 
times you want to cry, or at 
times, you just want to jump 
for joy at the progress 
Wilson is making at claim- 
ing his wife's love back. 

Adding Noah and Allie 
into the mix really made 
this novel interesting, as 
"The Notebook" still 
remains my all-time favorite 
book and movie. Overall, I 
give this book a five out of 
five. Nicholas Sparks is 
nothing short of amazing. 



''Superman Returns" is nothing special 



Dominic Giallombardo 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_djglallomb@clarion,edu 




"Superman Returns" 
Warner Brothers 
Rating: 3.5/5 



CLARION. Oct. 5 - 
Superman Returns, a 
Warner Bros, picture that 
was released in June of 
2006, is a return to the 
Superman legacy. This WB 
action/adventure film is 
suitable for children of all 
ages. 

Superman (Brandon 
Routh) returns from a trip 
to Krypton in search of what 
may remain of his home 
planet. Superman returns to 
find a world completely dif- 
ferent from that which he 
left; Lex Luther (Kevin 
Spacey) has escaped his 
prison sentence by a mistri- 
al because Superman was 
not present to testify 
against him. Also. Lois Lane 
(Kate Bosworth) is engaged 



and has a son to another 
man. 

Superman attempts to 
put his life back together as 
Clark Kent, by returning to 
work at the Daily Planet, 
and tries to mend his rela- 
tionship with Lane, both as 
Clark Kent and as 
Superman. 

While all this is going on 
Luther takes the crystals, 
which are the key to unlock- 
ing great knowledge, which 
Superman's father had left 
for him in a cave in 
Antarctica. Luther, of 
course, uses this power for 
greed and power and finds a 
way to create a new conti- 
nent. 

While investigating a 
story about a coast-wide 
black out, Lane and her son 
uncover Luther's plan and 
attempt to prevent his plans 
through the help of 
Superman. Luther however 
has uncovered the one fatal 
element that can bring 
down Superman... 

Kryptonite. 

Luther plants the 
Kryptonite around the 
Crystal and begins to build 
his own continent, which 
would in turn kill billions of 
Americans and put the east 
coast of America under 
water. 

While trying to stop 
Luther's plan. Superman 
gets injured by the deadly 
Kryptonite and is rescued 
by Lane and taken to a hos- 
pital on land. I don't want to 
give away the ending so 
you'll have to check the 



movie out for yourself. 

Superman Returns is 
set for DVD release on 
November 28, 2006; it is 
highly suggested that you 
either rent or buy a copv 
and experience the wor.uer 
that is Superman. 

The love scenes are 
bearable and don't over- 
power the action. The spe 




"Friday Night Lights" 
continued from page 

In Dillon High's season 
opener, star quarterback 
Jason Street (Scott Porter) 
is knocked out with a spinal 
injury and in comes the ter- 
rified benchwarmer Matt 
Saracen (Zach Gilford), who 
throws a pass off his own 
lineman's helmet before 
tossing a majestic, Doug 
Flutie-like Hail Mary for 
the winning touchdown. 

Can little Matt Saracen 



lead Dillon to state champi- 
onship glory? Talk at the 
weekly Rotary luncheon at 
Applebee's suggests not. 
But the Saracen character's 
loaded with pathos -- he 
likes to draw, and he cares 
for his grandmother while 
his father's in Iraq. 

He's Flutie, but once 
more with feeling. The for- 
mer Boston College quar- 
terback's miracle happened 
in 1984, anyway, and most- 
ly endures as a Top 10 
something-orother on a 
"SportsCenter" or "College 



Game Day" highlight pack- 
age. 

"Friday Night Lights" 
blitzes the fact that you can 
still play high school foot- 
ball as a parable of inno- 
cence lost. I like the charac- 
ters on "Two-a-Days" better, 
though -- the parents and 
adults, Repete's name, 
Alex's sly-seeming grin, 
Coach Propst's gut. As TV, 
"Friday Night Lights," with 
its cinematic sheen, is the 
gleaming dynasty across 
town. 



cial effects are amazing, but 
they don't take away from 
the importance of 

Superman. 1 could have 
foreseen the special effect 
guy going overboard with 
explosions and such. 

Of course, Spacey is an 
amazing evil menace and 
plays the role of a bad guy 
quite well. He has the per- 
fect attitude, doesn't try to 
go for the "crazy" aspect, 
and does the "genius" aspect 
perfectly. 

1 give this movie a 3.5 
out of 5; it has a little bit of 
everything: thrills, explo- 
sions, love interests and 
conflicts and the all impor- 
tant sinister "bad guy" who 
is out to ruin the world. 



LEGAL NOTICE 



If you rented U-Haul moving equipment from a U-Haul center or independent dealer in tfie state of 

Pennsylvania after August 7, 1992, and were charged for a second rental term because you returned the 

equipment after the scheduled return time but within 24 hours, then you are a member of a Class Action 

Lawsuit against U-Haul International, Inc, and U-Haul Co. of Pennsylvania (collectively "U-Haul"). You are not 

being sued The Class has sued U-Haul for refunds of these charges. As these charges were only applied to 

people who returned equipment after the scheduled retum time, u-Haul believes these charges afxiropriate 

and necessary to maintaining its tow-cost rentals; U-Haul has denied any wrongdoing or liability. 

There has not been any deteimination of tfie merits of the lawsuit. 

Tfie Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas has granted a preliminary approval of a settlement between ttie 

Plaintiff Class and U-Haul. The settlement provides monetary benefits in the form of refunds of some of ttie 

additional rental charges to Class members who submit a valici and timely claim. If you submit a valid and timely 

claim form, you will receive 75% of the amount you were charged for a second rental term. If the total amount 

claimed by class members exceeds 5250,000.00, each Class member will receive a pro rata share of the 

settlement amount Yoir claim will be subject to research to determine its validity. If the amount claimed is less 

than $250,000 00, U-Haul will donate the difference to charity As part of the settlement, counsel for plaintiffs 

will not seek or receive any fees or expenses in connection with this litigatic^. 

A leqal notice concerning this lawsuit was published in this newspaper on or about Septemtjer 30, 2005. If you 

did not exclude yourself from tfie Class in response to that earlier notice, you are efaibte to participate in trie 

settlement. In ader to receive money from the settlement, you must submit a valid Claim Form postmarked on 

or before December 1 , 2006. You may obtain a copy of the settlement agreement and claim form by calling 

1-877-745-4148 or by visiting www.U-HAULPennsylvaniaUtigation.com. If you do not submit a Claim Form, you 

will not receive money, but will be bound by the settlement. It you previously excluded yourself from the Class, 

you will not be entitied to submit a daim for money, but you will still have thie nght to file your own lawsuit. 

If the settlement is finally approved by the Court, you will be bound by the settlement unless you 

previously excluded yourself from the Class. 

A final hearing to detemiine whether the settlement is fair, reasonable and adequate and should be finaBy 

approved will be held before the Honorable f\/lark I. Bernstein. Courtroom 246, Oty Hall, Philadelphia, PA on 

January 8, 2007 at 9:30 AM The final heanng may be continued without fijrther notice You have the nght to 

appear at the final ap^oval hearing and to object to the settlement. If you wish to do so. yoti may 

(but are not required to) gwe advance notice of your intent to ot^ect by mailir^, postmarxed on or before 

December 1 5, 2006. a statement outlining the nature of your objection, addressed to 

U-Haul Litigation, P Box 2081, PhilcKtelphia, Pennsylvania 191 CO. 

You can ctotain additional information about this lawsuit and your rights by calling 1 -877-745-41 48 a by visiting 

www.UHAULPennsylvaniaLitigation.com. You can also call a e-mail any one of plaintiffs' three attorneys; 

Joanna Buchanico - 21 5-81 4-6750 - |buctianioo@boloqnese-law,com 

Richard D Greenfield - 410-745-4149 - whitehatrdg@earttTlink net 

Ann Caldwell - 21 5-248-20:X) acaldwell@classactlaw.oom 

Do Not CaU U-Haul Offices, tfie Court a the Judge. 

Reference: Ba/le et al v U-Haul International. LW . et a) . Augu^ Term 1998 (Mo 0840 
(Courl of Common Pleas Philadelphia. Pennsylvania) 



Pages. 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



October 5. 2006 



llmifie/s 



\^\)fM\^hn\\±Mi\lmu\\k 




Congrats to Marcie on sister 
of the week and Kylee on 
chair of the week. 
- V AZ 




Don't forget to attend the 
Autumn Leaf Festival 
parade at noon and come to 
the football game following 
the parade! 

Phantom of the Opera sign- 
ups start October 9 at the 
Gemmell Info Desk. 

WCUC 91.7 Hippie Chick 
Radio Wednesdays 9 p.m.- 
midnight. It's timeless and 
cool! 

Cowboys & Outlaws, WCUC 
97.1 Thursdays 6- 9 p.m. It's 
timeless "country" cool! 

NCASC meeting- October 
16 at 7 p.m. in 248 
Gemmell! Come hear a com- 
munication professor speak 



and get involved in our club! 

Watch WCUB-TV 
On Campus channel 5 
Adelphia Cable Channel 15 

News at 7 p.m. each night, 
Off the Bench Mondays at 
7:30, Sports Night 
Thursdays at 7:30 and 
watch for other programs 
soon! 

FIZZ! FOCUS! FUEL 
GOOD with LIFTOFF! 
NEW Effervescent Energy 
Drink Fight fatigue ~ 
Improve Mental 

Performance. Contact SAN- 
DRA AMATO Local 
Herbalife Independent 
Distributor (814) 764-3446 
www.getliftoffnow.com/ 
samato. 




Inexpensive apartment in 
Shippenville, Pa., call 814- 
782-3270. 

Two Bedroom apt. Fully fur- 
nished. Available Fall 2006- 



Spring 2007. Call Patty at 
814-745-3121 or 814229- 
1683. www.lakenapart- 
menta.com 

A selection of houses and 
apts. available for Fall 2007- 
Spring 2008. Some close to 
campus. Fully furnished. 
Accomodations from 1-8 
people. Call Patty at 814- 
745-3121 or 814 229- 1683. 
www. Iakeiiapartment8.com 

Room in Victorian Home 
close to University, reason - 
abe, includes all utihties & 
cable. Available Fall & 
Spring. Call Rebecca 814- 
226 6442 or after 1 p.m. 
814226-6651. 

Serious Students! Are you 
looking for a FREE PLACE 
to live? Do you like horses? 
We offer free room and 
board in our home for occa- 
sional chores and house sit- 
ting. 7 miles from campus. 
Call Gwen at 814- 379-3769 
or gwwills@pennswoods.net 

EAGLE PARK APART- 
MENTS- Fully 



furnished, includes utilities, 
3 blocks from campus. 
Leasing for Spring. 
Summer, & Fall. SAFE, 
CLE:AN, BEAUTIFUL. 
(814) 2264300 

www.eaglepark.net 

House for rent, with five 
bedrooms/2-baths for five 
students. Available for 
spring and fall 2007 and 
spring 2008. Washer, Dryer, 
Stove and Refrigerator 
included, off street parking, 
$1050.00 per semester per 
student + utilities. Call 814- 
2268185 and leave a mes 
sage. 

SILVER SPRING 
RENTALS- Apartments for 
2-4 people & Houses for 38 
people available for the Fall 
2007/Spring 2008 semes- 
ters. Call Barb at (814) 379- 
9721 for more information. 

•Three bedroom house* 

.accomodates up to 4, near J 
•campus located on Wilson* 
«Ave., semi-furnished, no« 
•pets. Call for info 814-772- • 
I9094 or 814-594-0981. I 




A.L.F Festival! 



PARTY TIME! 



today. Every time I smile 

I'm thinking of you! 

- Love 

Your Favorite 

2 Days! I can't wait! See you 

soon. 



Good Luck Y'all 



Hi Michelle! 




Go Steelers 



Eric, 

Happy 1 yr. anniversary! I 
knows its been tough at 
times but I still love you as 
much as 1 did a year ago 



Travel with STS to this 
year's top 10 Spring Break 
Destinations! Best deals 
guaranteed! Highest rep 
commissions. Visit 
www.ststravel.com or call 1- 
800-648-4849. Great Group 
Discounts. 




Take The Clarion CaU "ALF Quiz! 
by Bryan Bingham 

1. The first A.L.F. was in what year? 

a) 1949 c) 1950 

b) 1954 d) 1953 

2. How many people attended A.L.F. in 1954? 

a) 1000 c) 2500 

b) 500 d) 800 

3. Which event is held on the last Friday of A.L.F? 

a) craft show c) car show 

b) kiddie parade d) cultural night 

4. How much is a cheese steak at the festival? 

a) $5 c)$7 

b) $6 d) $8 

5. In 1955 local businesses donated to collect 

parking fees to raise money for A.L.F. 

a) parking meters c) fme-o-meter 

b) money d) meter maids 



6. What year did A.L.F. become a permanent event? 

a) 1960 c) 1961 

b) 1951 d) 1955 



7. A.L.F. lasts for days this year. 

a) 13 c) 7 

b) 10 d) 9 

8. Homecoming events were not afiliated with A.L.F. 
until what year? 

a) 1960 c) 1954 

b) 1959 d) 1962 



9. For A.L.F. in 1960, 

a) 10,000 

b) 4,000 

10. In 2005 about 
weekend. 

a) 8,000 

b) 10,000 



people visited Cooks Forest. 

c) 19,000 

d) 3,000 

people visited Clarion for A.L.F. 

c) 15,000 

d) 20,000 



'OQi. 'B-6 'o-Q 'PZ 'qg '0'9 'q'fr 'bc '^Z 'pi, isjeMsue 



Look for chances to win prizes from our ^cliislve i^arkm Call giveaways. 





Check 
back next 
week for 
the 



answer! 



f 




Last week's answer: 
Marwick-Boyd. 



IZZI'S THURSDAY 
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814-764-5095 Smoiong & Non-Smoking Dining Areas J 




Alex >Vilson 

Freshman, Communication 
"Strawberries." 




By 

Phil Drelick 

''If you could have 

any topping on a 

Poorman's Carmel 

Apple what would 

it be? " 




BlANCA ATTERBERRY 

Freshman, Communication 
"Skittles." 






Rob Stevenson 

Sophomore, Undecided 
"M&Ms." 



Nick Laugelui 

Junior, Business 
"Meat." 



Billy Nash 

Sophomore, Political Science 
"Cotton Candy." 



Lalira Vansickel 

Freshman, Radiolocjy 
"Mushrooms and broccoli." 




October 5. 2006 



TffiCLMUOyCALL 



Pagel 



Tennis defeats Georgian Court 8-1 



Katelyn Monrean 
aarlon Call Staff Writer 

8_Kimonr8aneclarlori.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 29 - The 
Golden Eagle Tennis team 
took on Georgian Court 
University at home on 
Friday, Sept. 29, 2006. 

The Georgian Court 
Lions traveled from New 
Jersey only to be defeated 
by the Golden Eagles. The 
Golden Eagles were victori- 
ous, 8-1, in the match that 
included singles and dou- 
bles action. 

In singles action, the 
following athletes were vic- 
torious : Lisa Baumgartner, 
Kristen Jack, Amy 
Robertson, Megan 



Robertson and Brittany 
Bovalino. The only loss in 
singles' matches was Corin 
Rombach. 

In doubles matches 
Rombach and Jack won 
their match as well as 
Baumgarter and Amy 
Robertson. Bovalino and 
Megan Robertson also won 
their match to make the 
Eagles perfect (3-0) in dou- 
bles play. 

This victory over 
Georgian Court helped the 
Clarion Golden Eagles to 
improve their record to 5-2. 
Captains Corin Rombach 
and Kristen Jack are hoping 
to lead the Golden Eagles 
back to the glory days of 
national competition that 
Head Coach Lori Sabatose 
enjoyed during her competi- 



tive days at Clarion. 

Sabatose said, "The 
match went great. 
Everyone played great. 
Defeating Georgian Court 8- 
1 was a great victory. They 
are in our East Region 
NCAA Division II so it will 
help for our regional rank- 
ings. I'm proud of how this 
team plays together in dou- 
bles. In singles it's an indi- 
vidual game but they sup- 
port and cheer for each 
other and show great sports- 
manship throughout the 
match." 

The match was the last 
home match of the season 
for the Golden Eagles. The 
next match for Clarion is 
against West Liberty on Oct. 
4. They then travel to Ship- 
pensburg for the PSAC's. 



Golf finishes second at Westminster 




Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s ektxiwserOclarion.edu 



WESTMINSTER, Oct. 2 - 
The Clarion University Golf 
team finished second on 
Monday Oct. 2 at the 
Westminster Invitational 
held at New Castle Country 
Club. The Golden Eagles 
shot a 312 for the day. 

Carnegie Mellon 

University won the event 
with a 308 to finish four 
shots ahead of Clarion. 
CMU's Christopher Lee and 
Alex Timmons finished first 
and second respectively in 
the individual tournament 
to help lead the Tartans to 
victory. M^lone College shot 
a 318 to finish in third 
place. 

Coming into the 



Westminster Invitational 
Clarion had won its previ- 
ous two tournaments. 'The 
team was disappointed in 
our performance this week," 
Coach Al Lefevre said. "We 
are looking for more consis- 
tency the rest of the season 
and heading into the 
PSAC." The PSAC 

Championship will be held 
Oct. 14 and 15 in Hershey. 

The Golden Eagles were 
led by senior Tom Will who 
shot a 76 to finish tied for 
fourth in the individual 
tournament. Junior Justin 
Moose and senior Justin 
Scott both finished with 77 
and tied for seventh place. 
The seventh place finish 
was the third consecutive 
finish in the top 10 for both 
Moose and Scott. Moose fin- 
ished in a four-way tie for 
first place at the Hal 
Hansen Invitational and 



finished in third place last 
week at the Wheeling Jesuit 
Invitational. Scott also fin- 
ished in a fourway tie for 
first at the Hal Hansen and 
won the individual crown in 
a playoff, last week Scott 
finished tied for tenth at the 
Wheeling Je.suit. 

Sophomore Nick 

Brucker shot an 82 and 
Preston Mullens shot an 83 
to round out the five- man 
team for the Golden Eagles. 

Also competing for the 
Golden Eagles in only the 
individual tournament were 
sophomore Justin Cameron 
and freshman Mike 
DeAngelo. Cameron shot a 
78 and DeAngelo had an 80. 

Next up for the Golden 
Eagles is a trip to Totter 
Ridge Golf Club in 
Greensburg Monday Oct. 9 
for the St. Vincent's 
Invitational. 



Clarion United Way's 5K Race raises 
$3500 for Fitzgerald Ramp Fund 



Mallory Bower 
United Way 



Phil DrellcK/Tlia Ctorfon Calf 
Match Point- Freshman Brittariy Bovalino won her singles match and doubles match in the Golden 
Eagles 8-1 victory over Georgian Court on Friday. 



CLARION, Sept. 30 - The 
United Way of Clarion 
County kicked off the A.L.F. 
festivities with their annual 
5K Race on Saturday Sept. 
30. More than 313 runners 
and walkers participated 
and helped to raise over 
$3,500 for the Fitzgerald 
Ramp Fund. 

Clarion University's 
cross country, swimming 
and wrestling teams sup- 
ported the event along with 
runners from A-C Valley, 
Clarion-Limestone and 
Clarion Area School 
Districts. The major sponsor 
for this years event was 




Photo Courtesy 

First Place- Sean McFarland won 
Saturday 

Tunnelton Liquids Co. 

The United Way of 
Clarion County's primary 
event sponsors were Clarion 



of Mallory Bower/Ctarlon United Way 

the United Way 5K on 

University and Sheetz. 

Each year the event con- 
tinues to grow due to the 



United Way's sponsors. 

Tennessee's Haynesworth suspended five games for incident on Sunday 



Sam Farmer 
Washington Post 

The NFL struck back 
Monday, suspending Albert 
Haynesworth without pay 
for five games a league 
record for an on-field offense 
because of the Tennessee 
defensive tackle's attack on 
an opposing player 

Haynesworth was eject- 
ed from the Titans game 
against Dallas on Sunday 
for stomping on the head of 



Andre Gurode after he had 
stripped the Cowboys center 
of his helmet in flinging him 
to the ground at the conclu- 
sion of a play in the third 
quarter. 

Gurode, lying on his side 
with his helmet ajar after a 
touchdown run by Julius 
Jones, was kicked by 
Haynesworth, who then 
twice raked his cleats across 
Gurode's face, opening 
wounds that required 30 
stitches. 

Haynesworth, a 6-foot- 



6, 320-pound fifth-year play- 
er from the University of 
Tennessee, was apologetic 
afterward, calling his 
actions "disgusting" and 
saying he deserved any 
sanctions that might be 
forthcoming from the 
league. 

However, the suspen- 
sion isn't his first, nor is this 
the first time he has been 
disciplined for kicking a 
player. 

Haynesworth was 

benched by Tennessee 



Coach Jeff Fisher for disci- 
plinary reasons in 2003, sit- 
ting out a game two days 
after a skirmish at practice 
with tackle Matt Martin. 
Earlier the same year, 
Haynesworth triggered a 
brawl during training camp 
when he kicked center 
Justin Hartwig. 

Sunday's incident was 
so egregious that a 
spokesman for Nashville, 
Tenn., police said the 
department took the unusu- 
al step Monday of contacting 



the Cowboys and offering 
help if Gurode wanted to 
pursue criminal charges. 

Calling the transgres- 
sion "an inexcusable action," 
NFL Commissioner Roger 
Goodell more than doubled 
the longest penalty previ- 
ously mandated by the 
league, a two-game suspen- 
sion in 1986 for Green Bay 
Packers defensive lineman 
Charles Martin for an 
unsportsmanlike hit on 
Chicago Bears quarterback 
Jim McMahon. Haynes- 



worth 's is the league's first 
suspension in four years. 

Haynesworth is not eli- 
gible to return until Nov. 19, 
when Tennessee plays at 
Philadelphia. 

"I felt there needed to be 
some serious action taken 
from a discipline stand- 
point, and I believe that 
what the league has done 
right now is adequate," 
Fisher said. 





i>/3/06 Flas Football Results 

Your Mom Still Free Ballin 26-11 

Still Free B Water Buffalo 42 -2C 

Clarion Craz Club X 66-0 

Nuphles TheStajfs 41-20 

Lunatics Steelers 42 -X 

D S Boys 3305 45-33 

Lumber Jack Get Em Boyz 41-14 

Dynasty Game Tirm 43-20 

Steel City Dudes 17-6 

Just Ball Cheeft 37-36 

Cnzf Joe R Black Out Boys 32-26 

YGFT Colt 45 52-50 

Black Out B Garden Gnomes 49-29 

Get Em Boys Garden Gnomes 33-21 

Lumberjacks McNutterbutters 43-20 

msm 

CrtiyJoeR just Ball 48-37 

Mac Attack Click-Clack 37-6 

Mac Attack Still Free Ballin 42-20 

Steel City S The Stags 42-14 

Get Em Boys Mc Nutterbutters 30O 

Clarion Crazi Lunatics 3 1 -22 

Clarion students who partic^ated in the 
^m^ Wjy ? K Rgp are eligible for hall 
price rein*ursement. Stop by the IM 
office and drop off your request, or e-mail 
it to dknepp@clari(»i.edu. 

clarian.edu/intramurais 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393-1 667 



Field Goal Contest 





\0/5/6 




Champ -Jeremy Knight 

Hits a 40 yard field goal! 

Dodgeball Results 



The n.W.o 
The BAM.F.S 
Dynasty 
Trash Monkeys 
9127106 
Dynasty 



Purple Cobras F 
TeamRamrod2-0 
BigBois 2-1 

Avg. Joe's 2-1 

BAM.F.S 2-0 



Average Joe's Gym Purple Cobras F 
Trash Monkeys Girty nasty 2-0 

Team Rarrrod Delta Zeta F 

Beach Volleyball Results 

\miH 

U%trs Adidas 21-11,21-17 



Volleyball Results 

mm 

Judcan f^l's Front 
The Contenders 
Priceless 
Team Sex Appeal 



Ligars N/A 

Team Sex Appeal F 
Delta Zeta N/A 
AT's 21-15.21-15 



Pink Flamingos B.K. Lounge 2 1 -8, 2 1 - 17 
The Killers Spikt Anywhtr* 21-14. 17-21. 11-9 

\mm 

Scurvy Contenders F 

Sunglasses @Night Ligers 2 1 - 17, 2 1 -1 7 
Getting Down To B Hartman F 

Priceless TheFlyltches 21-18,21-12 
Off in Shower Brusin Blues 21 -4. 1 5- 1 
Spike Anywher Teeeeaaammm 2 1 - 17. 1 5-1 3 

Scurvy At's F 

Athlttically Ch»ll«n jtd Hartman 21-17.21-16 
T«vn S«x App(«i Th( Killtr^ 2 1 - 16. 17-1 5 

Outdoor Soccer Results 

\ mm 

Quahog Warriors 

Shitzengi^le 

Internationals 

\mm 

Shittzengiggles 
Nads 



Hot Pockets 3-0 
Nads 5-3 

Speicher 4-0 

Hot Pockets 3-1 
Internationals 30 
Speicher 3-1 



Ultimate Frisbee Champs 




"Glass Box of Emotion" 
Matt Huber, Joih Lobel«ohn, Ryan 
Petterion, Jared Gagnc» Nick Gvlliani, 
Megan Ceeconie, Radui Bojdan, Matt 
Steeir, Anna Galyxia, and Sam 
Weyandt. 

10/3/06 Championthip 
a«s Box Of Emotior* Bonus 9-2 

I Pitch Softball Tournament 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14™ 
COST $20 PER TEAM 

CLARION COUNTY PARK 
Tourney will be limited to the first 12 teams 
to register by 10/ 12 and pay the fee. This is 
a Co-Rcc Tournament and all rules arc 
posted at the REC Center. 



Page 8 



THE CLARION CALL 



October 5, 2006 



ClmitMs 



\mV Ills. Tniui. fjiipliiviiinil, Fur liriil. IVniiiiiils. iinil licniTiil lil^ 



'a 



ftC£KS 



aWipipl 



Congrats to Marcie on sister 
of tho week and Kylee on 
chair of the week. 
V \7 




Don't forget to attend the 
Autumn Leaf F'estival 
parade at noon and come to 
the football game following 
the parade! 

Phantom of the Opera sign- 
ups start October 9 at the 
Gemmell Info Desk. 

WCUC 91.7 Hippie (Miick 
Radio Wednesdays 9 p.m.- 
midnight. Its timeless and 
cool! 

Cowboys &. Outlaws. WCUC 
97.1 Thursdays (r 9 p.m. It's 
timeless "country" cool! 

NCASC meeting- October 
16 at 7 p.m. in 2 IS 
Gemmell! Come hear a com- 
munication profes.'^or speak 



and get involved in our club! 

Watch WCUB-TV 
On Campus channel 5 
Adelphia Cable Channel 15 

News at 7 p.m. each night. 
Off the Bench Mondays at 
7:30. Sports Night 
Thursdays at 7:30 and 
watch for other programs 



soon 



FIZZ! FOCUS! FUFL 
GOOD with LIFT-OFF! 
NEW Effervescent Energy 
Drink Fight fatigue ~ 
Improve Mental 

Performance. Contact SAN- 
DRA .\MATO Local 
Herbalife Independent 
Distributor (81 764-3446 
www.getliftoffnow.com/ 
samato. 




RENT 



faun 



Inexpensive apartment in 
Shippenville. Pa., call 814- 
782-3270. 

Two Bedroom apt. Fully fur 
nished. .Available Fall 2006- 



Spring 2007. Call Patt\ at 
H 11-7 15-3121 or 814-229- 
1683. www.lakenapart- 
ments.com 

A selection of houses and 
apts. available for Fall 2007- 
Spring 2008. Some close to 
campus. Fully furnished. 
Accomodations from 1-8 
people. Call Patty at 814- 
7453121 or 814 229 1683. 
www. Iakenapartment8.com 

Room in Victorian Home 
clo.se to University, reason- 
abe. includes all utilities & 
cable. .Available Fall & 
Spring. Call Rebecca 814" 
226 5442 or after 1 p.m. 
814226 5651. 

Serious Students! .Are you 
looking for a FREE PLACE 
to live? Do you like horses? 
We offer free room and 
board in our home for occa- 
sional chores and hou.se sit- 
ting. 7 miles from campus. 
Call Gwen at 814- 3793759 
or gwwiU8@penn8woods.net 

EAGLE PARK APART 

MENTS- Fullv 



furnished. includes utilities. 
3 blocks from campus 
Leasing for Spring, 
Summer, & Fall. SAFE. 
(M.EAN. DE.VUTIFUL. 
(814) 2264300 

www.eaglepark.net 

House for rent, with five 
bedroonis/2-bMths for five 
students. .Available for 
spring and fall 2007 and 
spring 2008. Washer. Dryer, 
Stove and Refrigerator 
included, off street parking. 
$1050.00 per semester per 
student -t- utilities. Call 814- 
226-8185 and leave a mes 
sage. 

SILVER SPRING 
RENTALS- Apartments for 
2 4 people & Houses for 3 8 
people available for the Fall 
2007/Spring 2008 semes- 
ters. Call Barb at (814) 379 

9721 for more information. 
••••••••••••••••• 

•Three bedroom house* 

, accomodates up to 1, near, 
•campus located on Wil.son* 
,Ave., semi-furnished, no, 
•pets. Call for info 814-772 • 
*9094 or 814-594 0981, ! 



PERSONALS 



A.L.F. 1 


't'stiv: 


1' 


P.XRTY 


TLMF 


1 


Good L 


ick Y'i 


dl 


Hi Mul 


lellc' 




Go Stet 


lers 





today. Every time I smile 
I'm thinking of you! 

liove 
Your Favorite 

2 Days! 1 can't wait! See you 
soon. 




Travel with STS to this 
xt'ar's top 10 Spring Break 
Destinations! Best deals 
''■'"'^^' guaranteed! Highest rep 

Happy 1 yr. anniversary! 1 j. j, ,„ „^ i s s i o n s . V i s i t 
knows its been tough at www.ststraveLcom or call 1" 
times but 1 still love you as 800-648-4849. Great Group 
much as 1 did a year ago Discounts. 




Take The Clarion Call "ALF' Quiz 
by Bryan Bingham 



1. The first A.L.F. was in what year? 

a) 1949 c) 1950 

b) 1954 d) 1953 

2. How many people attended A.L.F. in 1954? 

a) 1000 c) 2500 

b) 500 d) 800 

3. Which event is held on the last Friday of A.L.F? 

a) craft show #) car show 

b) kiddie parade # cultural night 

4. How much is a cheese steak at the festival? 

a) $5 c) $7 

b) $6 d)$8 

5. In 1955 local businesses donated to collect 

parking fees to raise money for A.L.F. 

a) parking meters c) fine-o-meter 

b) money # meter maids 



6. What year did A.L.F, become a permanent event? 

a) 1960 c) 1961 

b) 1951 d) 1955 



7. A.L.F. lasts for days this year. 

a) 13 c) 7 

b) 10 d) 9 

8. Homecoming events were not afiliated with A.L.F. 
until what year? 

a) 1960 c) 1954 

b) 1959 d) 1962 



9. For A.L.F in 1960, 

a) 10,000 

b) 4,000 

10. In 2005 about __ 
weekend. 

a) 8,000 

b) 10,000 



people visited Cooks Forest. 

c) 19,000 

d) 3,000 

people visited Clarion for.\.L.F. 

c) 15,000 

d) 20,000 



O'Ol. 'B'S '08 'PZ 'P'9 '3'S 'P't' 'Be 'B2 'p 1, :sjaMSUB 



Look for chances to win prizes from our exclusive Clarion Call giveaways. 



«-nii|Pi» mill ■■■■j ■mil inn ■■■^^B^ ^^,» ^,,,,* '.^MF 

Hlmre in Ckrion? \ i| 




Check 
hack next 
week for 
the 



answer 1 



f 




Last week's answer: 
Marwick-Boyd. 



IZZI'S THURSDAY I 
NIGHT Cj/{^ft^ 

Ail Day or Until We Run Out 

Sold by Half Dozen and Dozen Only!!!! 

(No Exceptions) 



PLUS 750 DRAFTS 




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Grcai. food, l.oungs. Spiru. Parties 

Open 7 days a week'at 11 a.m. 

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81 4-764-5095 $n-okrTiSr;c;i-Si-:o>rjDr;ng Areas J 



I 




Alkx Wilson 

FKISIIMAN, COMMlNIt AI ion 

"Strawberries." 




By 
Phil Drelick 



''If you could have 

any topping on a 

Poorman's Carmel 

Apple what would 

it be?" 




BlANCA ATTKRHKRRV 

Frisiiman, CoMMi nk ai ion 
"Skittles." 






Rob Si kn i:nson 

SOl'IIOMORI , UnDI C 11)1 IJ 

"M&Ms." 



Nic K Laii<;eum 

Junior, Hi isini^ss 
"Meat." 



BiLiA Nash 

Sophomorf;, Poi iikai S( unce 
"Cotton Candv." 



IvAl RA VaNSUKKL 

Frisiiman, Raoioi oon- 
"Mushrooms and broccoli." 




October 5, 2006 



Tffi CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



Tennis defeats Georgian Court 8-1 



Katelyn Monrean 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

8_kjmonrean®clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 29 - The 
Golden Eagle Tennis team 
took on Georgian Court 
University at home on 
Friday, Sept. 29, 2006. 

The Georgian Court 
Lions traveled from New 
Jersey only to be defeated 
by the Golden Eagles. The 
Golden Eagles were victori- 
ous, 8-1, in the match that 
included singles and dou- 
bles action. 

In singles action, the 
following athletes were vic- 
torious: Lisa Baumgartner, 
Kristen Jack, Amy 
Robertson, Megan 



Robertson and Brittany 
Bovalino. The only loss in 
singles' matches was Corin 
Rombach. 

In doubles matches 
Rombach and Jack won 
their match as well as 
Baumgarter and Amy 
Robertson. Bovalino and 
Megan Robertson also won 
their match to make the 
Eagles perfect (3-0) in dou- 
bles play. 

This victory over 
Georgian Court helped the 
Clarion Golden Eagles to 
improve their record to 5-2. 
Captains Corin Rombach 
and Kristen Jack are hoping 
to lead the Golden Eagles 
back to the glory days of 
national competition that 
Head Coach Lori Sabatose 
enjoyed during her competi- 



tive days at Clarion. 

Sabatose said, "The 
match went great. 
Everyone played great. 
Defeating Georgian Court 8- 
1 was a great victory. They 
are in our p]ast Region 
NCAA Division II so it will 
help for our regional rank- 
ings. I'm proud of how this 
team plays together in dou- 
bles. In singles it's an indi- 
vidual game but they sup- 
port and cheer for each 
other and show great sports- 
manship throughout the 
match." 

The match was the last 
home match of the season 
for the Golden Eagles. The 
next match for Clarion is 
against West Liberty on Oct. 
4. They then travel to Ship- 
pensburg for the PSAC's. 



Goif finishes second at Westminster 




Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s ekbowser@ciarion edu 



WESTMINSTER, Oct. 2 - 
The Clarion University Golf 
team finished second on 
Monday Oct. 2 at the 
Westminster Invitational 
held at New Castle Country 
Club. The Golden Eagles 
shot a 312 for the day. 

Carnegie Mellon 

University won the event 
with a 308 to finish four 
shots ahead of Clarion. 
CMU's Christopher Lee and 
Alex Timmons finished first 
and second respectively in 
the individual tournament 
to help lead the Tartans to 
victory. Malone College shot 
a 318 to finish in third 
place. 

Coming into the 



Westminster Invitational 
Clarion had won its previ- 
ous two tournaments. "The 
team was disappointed in 
our performance this week," 
Coach Al Lefevre said. "We 
are looking for more consis- 
tency the rest of the season 
and heading into the 
PSAC." The PSAC 

Championship will be held 
Oct. 14 and 15 in Hershey. 

The Golden Eagles were 
led by senior Tom Will who 
shot a 76 to finish tied for 
fourth in the individual 
tournament. Junior -lust in 
Moose and senior Justin 
Scott both finished with 77 
and tied for seventh place. 
The seventh place finish 
was the third consecutive 
finish in the top 10 for both 
Moose and Scott. Moose fin- 
ished in a four way tie for 
first place at the Hal 
Hansen Invitational and 



finished in third place laHt 
week at the Wheeling Jesuit 
Invitational. Scott al.'^o fin- 
ished in a fourway tie tor 
first at the Hal Haiism and 
won the individual crown in 
a playoff, last week Scott 
finished tied tor tenth at the 
Wheeling Jesuit. 

Sophomore Nick 

Brucker shot an 82 and 
Preston Mullens shot an H3 
to round out the five-man 
team for the Golden Kagles. 

Also competing for the 
Golden Eagles in only the 
individual tournament were 
.sophomore Justin Cameron 
and freshman Mike 
De.Angelo. Cameron shot a 
78 and DeAngelo had an 80. 

Next up for the Golden 
Eagles is a trip to Totter 
Ridge Golf Club in 
Gri'ensburg Monday Oct. 9 
for the St. Vincent's 
Invitational. 



Clarion United Way's 5K Race raises 
$3500 for Fitzgerald Ramp Fund 



Mallory Bower 
United Way 



Phil Drellek/Tlie Cfar/on Ca// 
Match Po/nt- Freshman Brittar)y Bovalino won her singles match and doubles match in the Golden 
Eagles 8-1 victory over Georgian Court on Friday. 



CLARION, Sept. 30 - The 
United Way of Clarion 
County kicked off the A.L.F. 
festivities with their annual 
5K Race on Saturday Sept. 
30. More than 313 runners 
and walkers participated 
and helped to raise over 
$3,500 for the Fitzgerald 
Ramp Fund. 

Clarion University's 
cross country, swimming 
and wrestling teams sup- 
ported the event along with 
runners from A-C Valley, 
Clarion-Limestone and 
Clarion Area School 
Districts. The major sponsor 
for this years event was 




of Matlory Bower/Clarion United Way 

the United Way 5K on 



Plioto Courtesy 

First Place- Sean McFarland won 
Saturday. 

Tunnelton Liquids Co. 

The United Way of 
Clarion County's primary 
event sponsors were Clarion United Way's sponsors. 



University and Sheetz. 

Each year the event con- 
tinues to grow due to the 



Tennessee's Hayneswortli suspended five games for incident on Sunday 



Sam Farnner 
Washington Post 

The NFL struck back 
Monday, suspending Albert 
Haynesworth without pay 
for five games a league 
record for an on-field offense 
because of the Tennessee 
defensive tackle's attack on 
an opposing player. 

Haynesworth was eject- 
ed from the Titans game 
against Dallas on Sunday 
for stomping on the head of 



Andre Gurode after he had 
stripped the Cowboys center 
of his helmet in flinging him 
to the ground at the conclu- 
sion of a play in the third 
quarter. 

Gurode, lying on his side 
with his helmet ajar after a 
touchdown run by Julius 
Jones, was kicked by 
Haynesworth, who then 
twice raked his cleats across 
Gurode's face, opening 
wounds that required 30 
stitches. 

Haynesworth, a 6-foot- 



6, 320-pound fifth-year play- 
er from the University of 
Tennessee, was apologetic 
afterward, calling his 
actions "disgusting" and 
saying he deserved any 
sanctions that might be 
forthcoming from the 
league. 

However, the suspen- 
sion isn't his first, nor is this 
the first time he has been 
disciplined for kicking a 
player. 

Haynesworth was 

benched by Tennessee 



Coach Jeff Fisher for disci- 
plinary reasons in 2003, sit- 
ting out a game two days 
after a skirmish at practice 
with tackle Matt Martin. 
Earlier the same year, 
Haynesworth triggered a 
brawl during training camp 
when he kicked center 
Justin Hartwig. 

Sunday's incident was 
so egregious that a 
spokesman for Nashville, 
Tenn., police said the 
department took the unusu- 
al step Monday of contacting 



the Cowboys and offering 
help if Gurode wanted to 
pursue criminal charges. 

Calling the transgres- 
sion "an inexcusable action." 
NFL Commissioner Roger 
Goodell more than doubled 
the longest penalty previ- 
ously mandated by the 
league, a two-game suspen- 
sion in 1986 for Green Bay 
Packers defensive lineman 
Charles Martin for an 
unsportsmanlike hit on 
Chicago Bears quarterback 
Jim McMahon. Haynes- 



worth's is the league's first 
suspension in four years. 

Haynesworth is not eli- 
gible to return until Nov. 19, 
when Tennessee plays at 
Philadelphia. 

"1 felt there needed to be 
some serious action taken 
from a discipline stand- 
point, and I believe that 
what the league has done 
right now is adequate." 
Fisher said. 





10/3/06 Flag Football Results 

Your Mom Still Free Ballin 26- 

StillFreeB Water Buffalo 42-20 

Clarion Craz Club X 66-0 

Nuphies The Sta^s 41-20 

Lur^atics Steelers 42-30 

D S Boys 3305 45-33 

Lumberjack GetEmBoyz 41-14 

Dynasty Game Time 43-20 
10/2/06 

Steel City Dudes 17-6 

Just Ball Cheefe 37-36 

Crazy Joe R Black Out Boys 32-26 

YGFT Colt 45 52-90 

Black Out B Garden Gnomes 49-29 

Get Em Boys Garden Gnomes 33-2 

Lumberjacks McNutterbutters 43-20 
9/21/06 

Crazy Joe R Just Ball 48-37] 

Mac Attack Click-Clack 37-6 

Mac Attack Still Free Ballin 42-20 

Steel City S The Stags 42-14 

GetEmBoys Mc Nutterbutters 30-0 

Clarion Crazi Lunatics 3 1 -22 

Clarion students who participated in the 
United Way 5 K Run are eligible for half 
price reimbursement. Stop by the IM 
office and drop off your request, or e-mai 
it to dknepp@clahon.edu. 

clarion.edu/intramurals 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393-1 667 



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Champ -Jeremy Knight 

Hits a 40 yard field goal! 

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"Glass Box of Emotion " 
Matt Huber. Joih Lobelsohn, Ryan 
Petterion, Jarcd Gagne, Nick Gviliani, 
Megan Cecconie, Radul Bojdan, Matt 
Steeir, Anna GaJyxia, and Sam 
Weyandt. 

10/3/06 Championthip 
Glass Box Ot Eniotjon Bonus f*2 

I Pitch Softball Tournament 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14^ 
COST $20 PER TEAM 

CLARION COUNTY PARK 
Tourney will be limited to the first 12 teams 
to register by 10/12 and pay the fee. This is 
a Co-Rec Tournament and all rules are 
posted at the P£C Center. 



Page 10 



Tffi CLARION CALL 



October 5. 2006 



i^jJ,yiliif UB^^ww.'jl II « ...,. 1' 



Sfirts 



Todaj: Foothal I drops M o pe ner to 111 Eolf finishe s second at West minste r 



Football falls to Slippery Rock in PSAC opener 



Chris Parks 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_csparks®clarion,eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 30 - 
Forget that the Golden 
Eagles are winless thus far 
in the 2006 campaign, PSAC 
West play opened up all over 
Pennsylvania and for many 
teams like Clarion it is the 
start of a new season and 
new goals. 

Unfortunately for them 
it was the same old result, a 
few key plays shifted the 
momentum toward Slippery 
Rock and they took down 
our Golden Eagles 31-7 on a 
rainy and stormy night in 
Clarion. 

The game had to be 
called with 2:01 left in the 
fourth quarter because of 
how heavy the rain and 
storm was. Lightning could 
be seen for miles and the 
storm lasted a couple hours 
driving everyone out of 
Memorial Stadium. Clarion 
dropped to 0-5 and 0-1 in 
the West, while SRU 
improved to 4-1 and TO in 
the west. 

As for the game. Clarion 
jumped out again to an 
early 7-0 lead thanks to an 
Eddie Emanuel two-yard 
touchdown run. Emanuel 
had 170 yards rushing on 25 
carries, and Head Coach Jay 
Foster wants to continue to 
get him the ball often. 

"Eddie is a tough back 
and he is our offense behind 
that line right now." 




Jenifer Poblete/TYie Clarion Call 
Defense - Clarion lines up against Slippery Rock on Saturday during the PSAC West opener at 
Memorial Stadum. The Golden Eagles fell 31-7 and dropped their record to 0-5. 



The Rock went on to 
score 31 unanswered points 
after that. Quickly after the 
Clarion score, receiver Luke 
Wetzel caught a 15-yard 
touchdown pass from quar- 
terback Nate Crookshank to 
tie it up at 7-7. A few series 
later, SRU kicker Ryan 
Daniel booted a 31 -yard 
field giving The Rock a slim 
10-7 lead going into the 
break. 

Out of the gates in the 
second frame. Coach Foster 



tried a little trickery and 
had an onside kick to open 
up the half. Instead SRU 
landed on it and marched 46 
yards on eight plays turning 
the game against the 
Golden Eagles. Foster took 
responsibility for the call. 

"I blew that call to 
onside the second half kick- 
off because we never really 
recovered after that score 
although the team kept 
after it as evidenced by the 
goal line stand and contin- 



ued ball movement by the 
offense." 

Crookshank hit Colin 
Golden for an 18 yard score 
giving Slippery Rock at 17-7 
lead. The Clarion offense 
tried some new looks as weU 
as they switched back and 
forth between Mark Rupert 
and lyier Huether at quar- 
terback. This was 
Huether's first action of the 
year and the freshmen was 
a bit nervous out there, but 
expect this sort of thing to 



keep happening according to 
Foster. 

"Our plans are that, for 
right now, Mark and lyier 
will continue to rotate until 
we are able to determine 
who is best to lead this 
team." 

The last two scores 
came on a Nate Crookshank 
one-yard score and a 
Damarcus Cleckley three- 
yard run before the rains 
and storm came to end this 
one. 

Golden Eagle fans will 
be out in full force this com- 
ing weekend as Cheyney 
comes to town at 2 p.m. this 
coming Saturday following 
the parade. Cheyney is also 
winless on the season so 
something has to give 
according to Foster. 

"Cheyney needs a win 
just like we do and one of us 
is going to break into the 
win column this week. 
Homecoming is always an 
exciting weekend on any 
campus and A.L.F. will just 
add to the flavor." 

In last season's home- 
coming game, Clarion got 
blown out 56-0 to East 
Stroudsburg and they 
haven't won a homecoming 
game since 2002 when they 
beat West Chester 34-28. 
The Golden Eagles aim to 
turn their season around 
when they take the field 
against Cheyney for the 
homecoming game on 
Saturday. 



Rivera says elbow still 
not at full strength 



Jim Baumbach 
Washington Post 

NEW YORK - Mariano 
Rivera admitted before 
Game one of the American 
League Division Series 
Tuesday night his elbow is 
not at full strength, which 
explains why the Yankees 
intend to limit his workload. 
"I wouldn't say I'm 100 per- 
cent," Rivera said. "But it's 
the playoffs. No time to look 
back. You have to lay it all 
on the table." 

Joe Torre has used 
Rivera for more than an 
inning without hesitation 
during previous postseason, 
but Torre insists he will only 
use Rivera for one inning 



this year to avoid further 
injury. 

Rivera, who missed 
three weeks in September 
resting a muscle strain just 
below his elbow, said he 
feels fine when he pitches. 
But it's hard for him to get 
loose again after he stops. 

Torre said he will not be 
tempted to use Rivera earli- 
er than the ninth. "Not 
when it comes to somebody's 
health," he said. "I know 
how he chomps at the bit, 
especially this time of year, 
but I think we are all of the 
mind that we want to be 
safe on this." 

But if the call happens 
to come before the ninth at 
some point this postseason, 
Rivera said he "won't be sur- 
prised at all." 






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^pofU Inform&Uon 



darfon hosts Ch^ffMy 
lnhomecc»ninggiim 

It'» A.L.F. week in 
Clarion. The Golden 
Eagles will be looking for 
their first win of the 2W6 
season thi« Saturday as 
the Golden Eagles mi^r 
tain Cheyney at Clarion's 
Memorial Stadium. 
Kickoff is set for 2pm, 
with the A.L.F. Parade 
starting at noon. 

The game can be 
heard on the Golden 
Eagle football network 
which includes WCCR- 
FM 92.7 and WKQW- 
FM, ^.3, as well as on 
the internet at 

Bedzonemedia.mm with 
Mike Kaliiumski calling 
the play by play and Pat 
Kahle providing the 
analysis. 

R»t8r in Ms first year 
at Clarion 

Clarion has started 
the 2(X)6 season with a 
deceiving 0-5 record. The 
2006 season opened at 
Mfin with the Dragons 
posting a 21-13 win. 
Game two, also on the 
road, saw Clarion drop a 
27- 1 decision at 
Kutztown, 

After losing to West 
Chester 49-21, the 
Eagles traveled to #10 
mnked Bioomsburg and 
threw a scare into the 
Huskies before towing in 
ti»e fourth quarter 24- IQ, 

Last Saturday 

Clarion lost the PSAC- 
West opener to Slippery 
Eock by a 31-7 margin. 
Hie Eagles have been in 
every game at halftime, 
leading Bloomsburg 10-7, 
trailing Kutztown and 
Slippery Rock by three, 
and Tiffin and West 
Chester by a touchdown. 
Foster is certainly 
no stranger to the PSC 
and NCAA Division II 
fcKJtball. Foster coached 
for 18 seasons at 
Slippery Rock before 
coming to Clarion, and 
was the defensive coordi- 
nator at the Rock for 17 
of those years. 

A native of Berwick, 
Maine, Foster is a 1985 
graduate of Plymouth 
State and coached two 
seasons under Danny 
Hale at West Chester 
before going to SRU. 

Ctarion c^femB pin- 
ing balanca 

The Golden EaglM 
are getting 268.6 #11 in 
PSAC) yards of total 
offense per game in 20M. 
Clarion is getting 141.6 
rushing yards (#7 in 
PSAC) and 127 passing 
yards Wl3 m PSAC) per 
game. 







i. 



odcasfs mow m popMlorlty 







Sciioiarship opporunity for CUP students 

See "News" page 2 



A.L.F. photo spreod 

See "PHOTO SPREAD" pag^^ ^"^ 





Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 




NCALL 



Volume 93 Issue 5 



October 12, 2006 




Weshif^on Pmi News Servic* 

mmimmimmmmmmm/iiKmimmmmimmaiiim 



INa to refund $30 
million 



Uroup lias agrei 
reftind $^n mill ion * 
cator8 w 
by their unii 

cImi ; 

COlTr - 

Unciei an agreement 
announced Tii'>-*'^m^' by 
New York u ney 
General Eliot Spitzer, 
about 66,000 current and 
former New York school 
teachera will get $30 mil- 
lion from TNG Life 
Insurance and Annuity 
Co., a unit of Amsterdam- 
based ING. 

Spitzer said the 
ap-eement is expected to 
result in greater disclo- ' 
sure of fees an<l revfmue- 
sharing agreei^ < n by 
companies miling miro 
rhent investments 

throughout the ( mnitn'. 

Ifiegai immigrants 
be{K>me stuck In 
pipeline 

SAN DIEGO - More than 
a dozen ilkeal immi- 
grants w> tiy 
trapped inside a cross- 
border pipeline structure 
Tuesday after a man got 
stuck in the narrow pas- 
isageway and had to be 
rescued by San Diego 
firefighters. 

The imraigrants were 
crawling through a pas- 
sageway connecting a 
Mexican-based industrial 
gas supplier with a hold- 
ing tank oii de, 
according to Lauren 
Mack, spokesperson for 
Immigration and 
Customs Enforcement. 

The concrete- encased 
paasage was used to pro-j 
tect piping that once car- 
ried liquefied oxygen, 
Mack said. 

The immigrants had 
crawled nearly to the exit 
point in the United 
when a m nng a 

pxxfty. woolttu ^wt■«te^ got 
stuck. Mack said. 
Firr i to break 

througJ 
extrr ' liaji. 

Compare sa^ recoiled 
lettuce Is frw of E.CoH 

The Sa' in- 

pany that is«Ui .ill 

of green leaf leu.. !" 
Tuesday that tieith 
gre* irrigation 

water teati 

the ""t«.i' ,.^ 

stra riS 

sick arly 200 peo- 

ple and killed three in a 
separate .spinach out- 
break 

reheved that 



all > 






and 






proc 






pre^ 


Ibm 


Nunes 


said 




^ 


ed 




M 


Tuf 







KB, 



CUP public safety strives to maintain saftey 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bel<oebler@clarion.e(ju 

CI^RION, Oct. 11 - High 
schools, and even colleges, 
across the U.S. have experi- 
enced a wave of school vio- 
lence throughout the past 
five weeks, which has 
resulted in many tragic 
deaths and injuries. 

On Sept. 11, in 
Montreal, Quebec, college 
student Kimveer Gill went 
on a shooting rampage at 
Dawson College, killing one 
woman and injuring 19, 
before shooting himself. 

Local college Duquesne 
University fell victim to 
school violence on Sept. 17, 
when known individuals 
opened fire on five 
Duquesne University bas- 
ketball players after a 
school dance. 

High school violence has 
been even more prevalent, 
with four incidents of vio- 
lence within two weeks. 

On Sept. 27 in Bailey 
Colorado, Duane Morrison, 
53, took six female students 
hostage. Morrison molested 
six of his hostages at the 
Platte Canyon high school, 
before killing one female 
and then killing himself. 

Just two days later, on 
Sept. 29 in Cazanovia, 
Wisconsin, student Eric 



Hainstock, 15, brought a 
shotgun and handgun to 
school and shot and killed 
Principal John Klang. 

Once again, just two 
days following the 
Wisconsin incident, an 



room Amish school house. 
Roberts killed five young 
females, and wounded six 
females, before shooting 
himself 

Most recently, in Joplin, 
Missouri, a 13-year-old male 



University student's feel 
about their safety on cam- 
pus after this sweep of vio- 
lence? 

"It's never been an issue 
of concern for me because 
I've never been given a rea- 




Bethany Ross/The Clarion Call 

Campus Securft^- CUP Police officer, Frank A. Remm/ck is one of the eleven officers on campus. 



Amish community in 
Paradise, Pa. experienced 
their own incident of school 
violence. 

Charles Carl Roberts IV, 
32, carried three fire arms, 
two knives, and 600 rounds 
of ammunition into a one- 



student entered his high 
school on Oct. 9 and fired an 
AK-47 into the ceiling of the 
high school and threatened 
to shoot two students. The 
student was immediately 
taken into police custody. 
How do Clarion 



son to feel unsafe on this 
campus," said sophomore, 
secondary education major, 
Alisha Casey. 

"Clarion University 
reflects the community! 
campusds reflect the com- 
munity no matter where you 



are," said David Tbdjeske, 
Director of Public Safety. 

Clarion employs 10 full 
time police officers and one 
full time security officer. 
Generally two officers are 
on duty at all times. 

Clarion University has 
an emergency response 
plan, which is not just uni- 
versity wide, but also in con- 
gruence with outside agen- 
cies. 

Tedjeske said that for 
safety reasons it is very 
important to keep the stu- 
dents informed. 

Tedjeske keeps student 
informed through the police 
blotter, the Web site and 
often campus-wide e-mails. 

In addition, Tedjeske 
said that enforcing physical 
security is also vital. 

Clarion University 

recently upgraded the video 
surveillance system and 
now has around 60-70 secu- 
rity cameras across campus. 
Tedjeske said the surveil- 
lance cameras "have been a 
tremendous help." 

While the recent sweep 
of school violence has 
alarmed the nation, this 
isn't a new concept. 

"The wakeup call for 
school violence was 
Columbine," said Tedjeske. 
"We, the industry of law 
enforcement, have been con- 
sidering this, this isn't just a 
recent problem." 



Kim pubiislied articie in education Journai 



Kelly Pennisi 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kpennlsi@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 9 - Clarion 
University's assistant pro- 
fessor of special education 
Dr. Young-Gyoung Kim has 
recently published an article 
entitled, "Relationships 
among Teachers 

Perspectives, Self-Reported 
Practices, and Concerns 
Related to an Alternate 
Assessment System." 

The article was pub- 
lished in the Spring 2006 
issue of Teacher Education 



and Special Education (vol- 
ume 29, number 2). 

The article is about Kim 
releasing a survey to special 
education teachers in 
Illinois. 

The teachers who were 
taking the survey had all 
been experienced in alter- 
nate assessment. Most of 
the teachers that were 
asked were already working 
in special education class- 
rooms and required a lot of 
time as it is. 

Kim sent more than 600 
surveys out and analyzed 
234 special education 
results. Kim's survey con- 



sisted of rating questions 
and open ended questions. 
The book focuses on con- 
cerns about assessment sys- 
tems in education. Because 
of the IDEA (Individual 
with Disabilities Education 
Act), which was passed in 
1997 all states should make 
their own alternate assess- 
ment. "In Illinois, 
they used portfolio assess- 
ment," Kim said. 

In a portfolio assessment 
teachers collect all evidence 
to show how students are 
progressing in the class- 
room. Examples of evidence 
are pictures, used materials, 



examples of students' work, 
etc. 

When conducting the sur- 
vey Kim received some neg- 
ative attitude. This was due 
to issues concerning time 
consumption. 

Being a special educa- 
tion teacher you have a lot 
of work being done. 

Kim said, "I expected 
somewhat of that type of 
response. I got to observe 
and see the burden and the 
stress that the teachers in 
Illinois had to deal with." 

One of the major issues 



was that the teachers felt 
that it was time consuming 
to put together a portfolio. 

They thought it was tak- 
ing up too much time. They 
suggested that a shorter 
type of portfolio be made. 

For example, maybe 
make a portfolio with a 
checklist. The teachers also 
mentioned that they would 
like more help from other 
teachers and more teacher 
training. Teachers were also 
concerned about more sup- 
port from administrators. 



DJ Kooi Here, founder of 
Hip-Hop comes to CUP 



Joanne Washington 
Communication Professor 

Tom Schott 
Information Writer 



CLARION, Oct. 9 - The 
Hip-Hop Symposium plan- 
ning team is pleased to 
announce DJ Kool Here will 
be a keynote speaker at the 
symposium which will be 
held on Oct. 18 in the 
Gemmell Student Complex 



Multi-Purpose Room. 

DJ Kool Here will take 
the place of ?uestlove 
(Questlove), who was sched- 
uled to appear along with 
Jeff Johnson during the 
evening session. 



i 





HlfyHop Symposium 



Photos courtesy of Joanne Washington 
Symposium guest speakers, Lisa Ellis and William Devlin. 



Four men stabbed 
in off-campus f Igiit 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

6_bekoeWer®clarion.edu 



CLARIONj Oct. 11 - Three 
men were attacked with a 
pocketknife at about l^SO 
a.m. on Oct. 8. outeide of a 
South St. residence by a 
Monroeville man. 

The attacker, identi- 
fied as Aaron Blose, 21, 
was arraigned Tuesday on 
charges of felony attempt- 
ed homocide and related 
offenses, according to The 
Derrick. 

Blose is currently 
being held in the Clarion 
County jail. 

According to a story by 
The Derrick, Blose has 
been charged with three 
counts each of attempted 
homocide, aggravated 
assault, simple assault, 
reckless endangerraent, 
harassment, one count of 
possessing an instrument 



of crime, disorderly con- 
duct, and public drunkstt* 
ness. 

Only one of the four 
men, Ryan McGorry, 26, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa., was a 
Clarion University stu- 
dent. 

According to The 
Derrick, the other individ- 
uals were identified as 
Zachary Henninger, 28, of 
Gibsonia, Pa., and Brian 
Neai Jr.. 19, of Port 
Allegany, Pa. 

Clarion Borough 

police Chief Mark Hall 
said Blose left the hmpit&l 
"against medical advice" 
aft«r receivii^ treatment 
for various injuries. 

Police are asking any- 
one else who witnesied 
the incident and has mA 
yet been interview by 
investigators to call the 
department at 814-226- 
9140. 



, 



Page 10 



TOE CLARION CALL 



Sftrts 



October 5. 2006 



T(iilii): f iHilliiill limps M upcoer lu SRI liolf MAs mmi ill llcsliiiiiislcr 



Football falls to Slippery Rock in PSAC opener 



Chris Parks 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_CSparKs@clarioi).eUu 

CLARION. Sept. M) - 
Forget that the (ioldcn 
Kagk's art' winless thus tar 
in the 20()() nimpai^'n. PSAC 
West play opened up all (ivi i 
Pennsylvania and for many 
teams likr Clarion it is the 
start of a new season nnd 
new goals. 

Unfortunately for them 
it was the same old result, a 
few key plays shifted the 
momentum toward Slippery 
Rock and they took down 
our Golden Eagles 31 -7 on a 
rainy and stormy !iight in 
Clarion. 

The game had to he 
called with 2:()1 leit in the 
fourth ijuarter hecause of 
how heavy the rain and 
storm was. Lightning could 
be seen for miles and the 
storm lasted a couple hours 
driving everyone out of 
Memorial Stadium. Clarion 
dropped to ()-5 and 0-1 in 
the West, while SRU 
improved to 11 and 1-0 in 
the west. 

As for the game, Clarion 
jumped out again to an 
early 7-() lead thanks to an 
Eddie Emanuel two-yard 
touchdown run. Emanuel 
had 170 yai'ds rushing on 25 
carries, and Head Coach Jay 
Foster wants to continue to 
get him the hall often. 

"Eddie is a tough back 
and he is our offense behind 
that line right now." 




Jenifer Poblete/rf>e Clarion Call 
Defense - Clarion lines up against Slippery Rock on Saturday during the PSAC West opener at 
Memorial Stadum. The Golden Eagles fell 31-7 and dropped their record to 0-5. 



The Rock went on to 
score 31 unanswered points 
after that. Quickly after the 
Clarion score, receiver Luke 
Wetzel caught a 15-yard 
touchdown pass from quar- 
terback Nate Crookshank to 
tie it up at 7-7. A few series 
later, SRU kicker Ryan 
Daniel booted a 31 -yard 
field giving The Rock a slim 
10-7 lead going into the 
break. 

Out of the gates in the 
second frame. Coach Foster 



tried a little trickery and 
had an onside kick to open 
up the half. Instead SRU 
landed on it and marched 46 
yards on eight plays turning 
the game against the 
Golden Eagles. Foster took 
responsibility for the caU. 

"I blew that call to 
onside the second half kick- 
off because we never really 
recovered after that score 
although the team kept 
after it as evidenced by the 
goal Hne stand and contin- 



ued ball movement by the 
offense." 

Crookshank hit Colin 
Golden for an 18 yard score 
giving Slippery Rock at 17-7 
lead. The Clarion offense 
tried some new looks as well 
as they switched back and 
forth between Mark Rupert 
and T>'ler Huether at quar- 
terback. This was 
Huether's first action of the 
year and the freshmen was 
a bit nervous out there, but 
expect this sort of thing to 



keep happening according to 
Foster. 

"Our plans are that, for 
right now. Mark and Tyler 
will continue to rotate until 
we are able to determine 
who is best to lead this 
team." 

The last two scores 
came on a Nate Crookshank 
one-yard score and a 
Damarcus Cleckley three- 
yard run before the rains 
and storm came to end this 
one. 

Golden Eagle fans will 
be out in full force this com- 
ing weekend as Cheyney 
comes to town at 2 p.m. this 
coming Saturday following 
the parade. Cheyney is also 
winless on the season so 
something has to give 
according to Foster. 

"Cheyney needs a win 
just like we do and one of us 
is going to break into the 
win column this week. 
Homecoming is always an 
exciting weekend on any 
campus and A.L.F. will just 
add to the flavor." 

In last season's home- 
coming game, Clarion got 
blown out 56-0 to East 
Stroudsburg and they 
haven't won a homecoming 
game since 2002 when they 
beat West Chester 34-28. 
The Golden Eagles aim to 
turn their season around 
when they take the field 
against Cheyney for the 
homecoming game on 
Saturday. 



Rivera says elbow still 
not at full strength 



Jim Baumbach 
Washington Post 



NEW YORK - Mariano 
Rivera admitted before 
Game (iiic of the .American 
League Division Series 
l\jesday night his elbow is 
not at full strength, which 
explains why tlie Yankees 
intend to limit his workload. 
"1 wouldn't say I'm 100 per- 
cent," Rivera said. "But it's 
the playoffs. No time to look 
back. You have to lay it all 
on the table." 

Joe Torre has used 
Rivera for more than an 
inning without hesitation 
during previous postseason, 
but Torre insists he will only 
u.se Rivera for one inning 



this year to avoid further 
injury. 

Rivera, who missed 
three weeks in September 
resting a muscle strain just 
below his elbow, said he 
feels fine when he pitches, 
f^ut it's hard for him to get 
loose again after he stops. 

Torre said he will not be 
tempted to use Rivera earli- 
er than the ninth. "Not 
when it comes to somebody's 
health." he said. "I know 
how he chomps at the bit. 
especially this time of year, 
but 1 think we are all of the 
mind that we want to be 
safe on this." 

But if the call happens 
to come before the ninth at 
some point this postseason, 
Rivera said he "won't be sur- 
prised at all." 




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Sports Brioft 



^gy 

''T^- 



Sports briefs courtesy of 
Sports Information 



Clarion hosts Cheyney 
in homecoming game 

It's A.L.F. week in 
Clarion. The Golden 
Eagles will be looking for 
their first win of the 2006 
season this Saturday as 
the Golden Eagles enter- 
tain Cheyney at Clarion's 
Memorial Stadium. 

Kickoff is set for 2pm, 
with the A.L.F. Parade 
starting at noon. 

The game can be 
heard on the Golden 
Eagle football network 
which includes WCCR- 
FM 92.7 and WKQW- 
FM, 96.3, as well as on 
the internet at 

Redzonemedia.com with 
Mike Kalinowski calling 
the play by play and Pat 
Kahle providing the 
analysis. 

Foster in his first year 
at Clarion 

Clarion has started 
the 2006 season with a 
deceiving 0-5 record. The 
2006 season opened at 
Tiffin with the Dragons 
posting a 21-13 win. 
Game two, also on the 
road, saw Clarion drop a 
27" 10 decision at 
Kutztown. 

After losing to West 
Chester 49-21, the 
Eagles traveled to #10 
ranked Bloomsburg and 
threw a scare into the 
Huskies before bowing in 
the fourth quarter 24-10. 

Last Saturday 

Clarion lost the PSAC- 
West opener to Slippery 
Rock by a 31-7 margin. 
The Eagles have been in 
every game at halftime, 
leading Bloomsburg 10-7, 
trailing Kutztown and 
Slippery Rock by three, 
and Tiffin and West 
Chester by a touchdown. 
Foster is certainly 
no stranger to the PSC 
and NCAA Division II 
football. Foster coached 
for 18 seasons at 
Slippery Rock before 
coming to Clarion, and 
was the defensive coordi- 
nator at the Rock for 17 
of those years. 

A native of Berwick, 
Maine, Foster is a 1985 
graduate of Plymouth 
State and coached two 
seasons under Danny 
Hale at West Chester 
before going to SRU. 

Clarion offense gain- 
ing balance 

The Golden Eagles 
are getting 268.6 (#11 in 
PSAC) yards of total 
offense per game in 2006. 
Clarion is getting 141.6 
rushing yards (#7 in 
PSAC) and 127 passing 
yards (#13 in PSAC) per 
game. 




I 



! 



/ 



Podcasts grow In popularity 

See "ENTERTAINMENT" page 5 




...^ 



Scholarship opporunlty for CUP students 

See "News" page 2 



A.LF. photo spread 

ISee "PHOTO SPREAD" page 12 



One copy free 





CLARIOM CALL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 



Volume 93 Issue 5 



^ 



October 12, 2006 




HatiOfiol 

Briefs 



i 



Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post Newsservice 

ING to refund $30 
million 

LOS ANGELOS 
Insurance giant ING 
Group has agreed to 
refund $30 million to edu- 
cators who were steered 
by their union into retire- 
ment funds that carried 
high fees and little-dis- 
closed payments to union 
coffers. 

Under an agreement 
announced Tuesday by 
New York Attorney 
General Eliot Spitzer, 
about 66,000 current and 
former New York school 
teachers will get $30 mil- 
lion from ING Life 
Insurance and Annuity 
Co., a unit of Amsterdam- 
based ING. 

Spitzer said the 
agreement is expected to 
result in greater disclo- 
sure of fees and revenue- 
sharing agreements by 
companies selling retire- 
rnent investments 

throughout the country. 



immigrants 
stuci^ In 



Illegal 

become 

pipeline 

SAN DIEGO - More than 
a dozen illegal immi- 
grants were briefly 
trapped inside a cross- 
border pipeline structure 
Tuesday after a man got 
stuck in the narrow pas- 
sageway and had to be 
rescued by San Diego 
firefighters. 

The immigrants were 
crawling through a pas- 
sageway connecting a 
Mexican-based industrial 
gas supplier with a hold- 
ing tank on the U.S. side, 
according to Lauren 
Mack, spokesperson for 
Immigration and 

Customs Enforcement. 

The concrete-encased 
passage was used to pro- 
tect piping that once car- 
ried liquefied oxygen. 
Mack said. 

The immigrants had 
crawled nearly to the exit 
point in the United States 
when a man wearing a 
puffy, woolen sweater got 
stuck. Mack said. 
Firefighters had to break 
through concrete to 
extract the man. 

Company says recalled 
lettuce Is free of E. Coll 

The Salinas, Calif., com- 
pany that issued a recall 
of green leaf lettuce said 
Tuesday that neither the 
greens nor its irrigation 
water tested positive for 
the potentially deadly 
strain of E. coli that has 
sickened nearly 200 peo- 
ple and killed three in a 
separate spinach out- 
break. 

'We are reUeved that 
all results were negative, 
and we are confident our 
product is safe," company 
president Tom Nunes 
said in a statement post- 
ed on its Web site 
Tuesday afternoon. 



CUP public safety strives to maintain saftey 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarior) Call News Editor 

s bf?k(H'l)irnd'r!a rion.edu 

CLAKIUN. Oct. 11 - High 
schools, and even colleges, 
across the U.S. have experi- 
I'liccd a wave of school vio- 
lence throu^'hout the past 
five weeks, which has 
resulted in many tragic 
deaths and injuries. 

On Sept. 11, in 
Montreal. Quebec, college 
-tutlent Kimveer Gill went 
I'll I shooting rampage at 
Dawson College, killing one 
woman and injuring 19. 
before shooting himself. 

Local college Duquesne 
University fell victim to 
school violence on Sept. 17, 
when known individuals 
opened fire on five 
Duquesne University bas- 
ketball players after a 
.school dance. 

High school violence has 
been even more prevalent, 
with four incidents of vio- 
lence within two weeks. 

On Sept. 27 in Bailey, 
Colorado, Duane Morrison. 
'i.'). took six female students 
hostage. Morrison molested 
six of his hostages at the 
I'latte ("anyon high school, 
before killing one female 
and then killing himself. 

'Just two days later, on 
Sept. 29 in Cazanovia. 
WiM-onsin, student Eric 



Hainstock, 13, brought a 
shotgun and handgun to 
.school and shot and killed 
Principal John Klang. 

Once again, just two 
days following the 

Wisconsin incident, an 



room .\niish school house. 
Roberts killed five young 
females, and wounded six 
females, before shooting 
himself. 

Most recentl\^ in Joplin, 
Missouri, a 1 .'l-vearold male 



University student's feel 
about their safety on cam- 
pus afti'r this sweep of vio- 
lence'' 

"It's never been an issue 
of concern for me because 
I've never been given a rea- 




Bethany Ross/The Clarion Call 
Campus Security- CUP Police officer, Frank A. Remnnick is one of the eleven officers on campus. 



Amish community in 
Paradise, Pa. experienced 
their own incident of school 
violence. 

Charles Carl Roberts IV, 
32. carried three fire arms, 
two knives, and 600 rounds 
of ammunition into a one- 



student entered his high 
school on Oct. 9 and fired an 
AK-47 into the ceiling of the 
high .school and threatened 
to shoot two students. The 
student was immediately 
taken into police custody. 
How do Clarion 



son to feel unsafe on this 
campus." said sophomore, 
secondary education major, 
Alisha Casey. 

"Clarion University 
reflects the community: 
campuses reilect the com- 
munity no matter where you 



are," said David Tedjeske, 
Director of Public Safety. 

Clarion employs 10 full 
time police officers and one 
full time security officer 
Generally two officers are 
on duty at all times. 

Clarion University has 
an emergency response 
plan, which is not just uni- 
versity wide, but also in con- 
gruence with outside agen- 
cies. 

Tedjeske said that for 
safety reasons it is very 
important to keep the stu- 
dents informed. 

Tedjeske keeps student 
informed through the police 
blotter, the Web site and 
often campus-wide e-mails. 
In addition, Tedjeske 
said that enforcing physical 
security is al.so vital. 

Clarion University 

recently upgraded the video 
surveillance system and 
now has around 60-70 secu- 
rity cameras across campus. 
Tedjeske said the surveil- 
lance cameras "have been a 
tremendous help." 

While the recent sweep 
of school violence has 
alarmed the nation, this 
isn't a new concept. 

"The wakeup call for 
school violence was 
Columbine," said Tedjeske. 
"We. the industry of law 
enforcement, have been con- 
sidering this, this isn't just a 
recent problem." 



Kim publisiied articie in education Journai 



Kelly Pennisi 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kpennisi@clarion.edu 

CLAKIO.X, Oct. 9 Clarion 
L'nnt'isity's assistant pro- 
te-^sni- of special education 
Di . N Dung-Gyoung Kim has 
recently published an article 
entitled. "Relationships 
among Teachers 

I'erspectives. Self-Reported 
Practices, and Concerns 
Hclaled to an Alternate 
.Assessment System." 

The article was pub- 
lished in the Spring 2006 
issue of Teacher Education 



and Special Education (vol- 
ume 29, number 2), 

The article is about Kim 
releasing a survey to special 
education teachers in 
Illinois. 

The teachers who were 
taking the survey had all 
been experienced in alter- 
nate assessment. Most of 
the teachers that were 
asked were already working 
in special education class- 
rooms and required a lot of 
time as it is. 

Kim sent more than 600 
surveys out and analyzed 
234 special education 
results. Kim's survev con- 



sisted of rating questions 
and open ended questions. 
The book focuses on con- 
cerns about assessment sys- 
tems in education. Because 
of the IDEA (Individual 
with Disabilities Education 
Act.), which was passed in 
1997 all states should make 
their own alternate assess- 
ment. "In Illinois, 
they used portfolio assess- 
ment." Kim said. 

In a portfolio as.sessment 
teachers collect all evidence 
to show how students are 
progressing in the class- 
room. Examples of evidence 
are pictures, used materials. 



examples of students" work, 
etc. 

When conducting the sur- 
vey Kim received some neg- 
ative attitude. This was due 
to issues concerning time 
consumption. 

Being a special educa- 
tion teacher you have a lot 
of work being done. 

Kim said, "l expected 
somewhat of that type of 
response. 1 got to observe 
and see the burden and the 
stress that the teachers in 
Illinois had to deal with." 

One of the major issues 



was that the teachers felt 
that it was time consuming 
to put together a portfolio. 

They thought it was tak- 
ing up too much time. They 
suggested that a shorter 
type of portfolio be made. 

F'or example, maybe 
make a portfolio with a 
checklist. The teachers also 
mentioned that they would 
like more help from other 
teachers and more teacher 
training. Teachers were also 
concerned about more sup- 
port from administrators. 



DJ Kooi Here, founder of 
Hip-Hop comes to CUP 



Joanne Washington 
Comnfiunication Professor 

Tom Schott 
Information Writer 



CLARION, Oct. 9 -The 
Hip- Hop Symposium plan- 
ning team is pleased to 
announce DJ Kool Here will 
be a keynote speaker at the 
symposium which will be 
held on Oct. 18 in the 
Gemmell Student Complex 



Multi-Purpose Room. 

DJ Kool Here will take 
the place of ?uestlove 
(Questlove). who was sched- 
uled to appear along with 
Jeff Johnson during the 
evening session. 



Four men stabbed 
in off-campus fight 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 




Photos courtesy of Joanne Washington 

Hip Hop SyrDposium - Symposium guest speakers, Lisa Ellis and William Devlin. 



CLARION, Oct. 11 -Three 
men were attacked with a 
pocketknife at about 1'30 
a.m. on Oct. 8. outside of a 
South St. residence by a 
Monroe ville man. 

The attacker, identi- 
fied as Aaron Blose, 21, 
was arraigned Tuesday on 
charges of felony attempt- 
ed homocide and related 
offenses, according to The 
Derrick. 

Blose is currently 
being held in the Clarion 
County jail. 

According to a story by 
The Derrick, Blose has 
been charged with three 
counts each of attempted 
homocide, aggravated 
assault, simple assault, 
reckless endangerment, 
hara.ssment, one count of 
possessing an instrument 



of crime, disorderly con- 
duct, and public drunken- 
ness. 

Only one of the four 
men, Ryan McGorry, 26, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa., was a 
Clarion University stu- 
dent. 

According to The 
Derrick, the other individ- 
uals were identified as 
Zachary Henninger, 28, of 
Gibsonia. Pa., and Brian 
Neal Jr., 19, of Port 
Allegany. Pa. 

Clarion Borough 

police Chief Mark Hall 
said Blose left the hospital 
"against medical advice" 
after receiving treatment 
for various injuries. 

Police are asking any- 
one else who witnessed 
the incident and has not 
yet been interview by 
investigators to call the 
department at 814-226- 
9140. 



Page 2 



im CUkRION CikLL 



October 12. 2006 



Ibws 



Faculty Senate amends Students Rights and 
Regulations, Grade Appeal Process Wording 



Adam Mohney 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ajmohney©clarion.edu 

CLARION. Oct. 9 - The 
Faculty Senate met on Oct. 
9 and approved a revision of 
the wording of the Grade 
Appeal Process section of 
the Student Rights and 
Regulations Handbook. 

The amendment was 
recommended by Academic 
Standards. Dr. Todd 
Pfannestiel, chair of the 
Faculty Senate, introduced 
the revision in absence of 
Academic Standard chair 
Dr. Sally Sentner. 

This change makes a 
clarification under the 
Student Rights and 
Regulations handbook, with 
regards to the grade appeal 
process as well as the aca- 
demic honesty policy," 
Pfannestiel said. 

Pfannestiel stressed 
that there were no changes 
taking effect, but rather a 
rewording to be sure stu- 
dents were aware of the dis- 
tinction between academic 
honesty and grade appeal. 

'The language did not 
exactly mirror what was 
going on with the flow chart 
that highlights the process 
of the handling of a violation 
of academic dishonesty," 
said Pfannestiel. 

There was not any dis- 
crepancy with the language 
being clear to students on 
whether it was a grade 
appeal or a question of 
whether or not it was an 
appeal to the accusation of 
academic dishonesty," he 
said. 

Pfannestiel said profes- 
sors are obligated to file a 



report if punitive action is 
taken, so that it is on the 
student's record. Many pro- 
fessors attending the meet- 
ing were not aware of this 
policy, which passed the 
Senate. Pfannestiel said an 
effort would be made to pub- 
licize the policy. 

Pfannestiel also empha- 
sized that a student always 
has the right to appeal accu- 
sations of academic dishon- 
esty and that past instances 
on the students record will 
not be taken into account 
until after the student has 
been convicted. 

'Tb's clarification does 
not change the process in 
any way; however, it makes 
clear the steps that students 
may take should they wish 
to appeal a course grade or 
face disciplinary measures 
related to a charge of aca- 
demic dishonesty. Students 
can now more easily under- 
stand the processes and the 
role of the Office of Judicial 
and Mediation Services in 
these events," Pfannestiel 
said. 

The changes will be 
found in the Student Rights 
and Regulations Handbook. 

Pfannestiel also offered 
the president's report 
because President Joseph 
Grunenwald was in 
Washington D.C. serving as 
a member of the board of 
Governors for the 

Renaissance Group. 

Pfannestiel announced 
Grunenwald has approved 
the search committees to 
select a new dean for the 
College of Education and 
Human Services and the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 
Grunenwald also appointed 



three additional members to 
each search committee. 

The additions to the 
search committee for the 
selection of a new dean for 
the College of Education 
and Human Services are 
William Bailey, Dean of 
Enrollment Management; 
Paul Bylaska, Vice 
President for Finance and 
Administration; Dr. Jeffrey 
Waple, Director of Campus 
Life. 

The additions to the 
search committee for the 
selection of a dean for the 
College of Arts and Sciences 
are Dr. Rashelle Karp, 
Assistant Vice-President for 
Academic Affairs; Dr. Chris 
Reber, Executive Dean of 
Venango Campus; Dr. 
James Pesek, Interim Dean 
of the College of Business 
Administration. 

Pfannestiel also 

announced the ground- 
breaking for the 
Biotechnology Business 
Development Center, which 
is scheduled for Oct. 24. The 
building and architectural 
work will be done through- 
out the winter with the 
building's construction set 
to begin next spring, accord- 
ing to Grunenwald. 

In addition, the bidding 
for the new science building 
will begin on Oct. 9 and end 
on Nov. 8. If there is a suc- 
cessful bidder, the site 
preparation will begin this 
winter, a series of construc- 
tion will take place in the 
spring, with groundbreak- 
ing held in "better weather" 
in the spring, according to 
Pfannestiel via 

Grunenwald. 

The Student Senate 



report was offered by 
Student Senator Joshua 
Pierce. Pierce said the 
Student Senate approved 
four financial matters. 
Three of the approvals were 
for trips and the other was 
to purchase a video scouting 
program for the womens 
basketball team. 

Student Affairs chair 
Jamie Phillips announced 
Lori 'faylor was elected 
chair of Student 

Subcomittee Activities on 
Oct. 4. 

Committee on 

Committee and Rules (CCR) 
chair Dr. Elisabeth Donato 
said the call for nominations 
for one representative for 
the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the College of 
Education and Human 
Services to the Faculty 
Development Committee 
was sent last Monday. The 
deadline for nominations 
will be Oct. 13. 

Dr. Barry Sweet report- 
ed the Budget Committee 
has been discussing CUPs 
allotment for PASSHE 
Performance Funding. 

Sweet says the committee 
feels they were not given a 
deserving grant, judging by 
the size of Shppery Rock 
University's grant. 

Dr Sue Courson offered 
a report on Institutional 
Resources. She reported 
that the Peirce Science 
Center parking lot will not 
close until the end of the 
Fall semester. 

The next meeting will be 
Oct. 23 at 3:30 p.m. in the 
Enid Dennis room of Hart 
Chapel. 



Krystal Finkbeiner 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_knfinkbein@clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Oct. 10- Clarion 
University students are 
encouraged to apply for a 
new PHEAA scholarship 
offered to only Clarion 
University students. 

According to Holman 
Copeland, director of 
Keystones smiles, PHEAA 
and PennSERVE are collab- 
orating for the first time to 
put together a scholarship 
program to help younger 
children in grades six 
through eight. This scholar- 
ship worth $2,000 dollars to 
each of eight Clarion 
University students. 

The scholarship is try- 
ing to mentor younger chil- 
dren and open their eyes to 
different careers available 
before they reach college. 

This will help undecided 
majors when registering for 
college. 



"This scholarship is 
designed to help students 
with their school work but, 
their main focus is to show 
the kids career choices," 
said Copeland. 

This opportunity allows 
Clarion students to take the 
kids outside of the class- 
room and give them hands 
on experiences. 

"There will be many 
times where the children 
will be taken on field trips 
such as Clarion football 
games. This will show what 
goes on in-order for a foot- 
ball game to happen. The 
people behind the scenes 
that make it run. The 

children can also get a 
chance to shadow a Clarion 
University student for a day 
to see what it is like to be a 
student and the tasks they 
undergo," said Copeland. 

You must at least be a 
full time Clarion student, be 
able to commit 300 hours 
fall and spring semester 



three times a week for two 
to three hours a week. The 
hours will be from 3 p.m. to 
6 p.m. 

"This is the first year we 
are having this scholarship, 
we are trying it in Clarion 
and other colleges as well. 
PHEAA actually 

approached Americore 
about having the opportuni- 
ty to think about your 
career before you enter col- 
lege," said, Copeland. 

According to Copeland 
everyone involved benefits 
from the program but, 
PennSERVE benefits from 
this program the most look- 
ing for the opportunity for 
college kids to contribute 
hours, which will count as 
community service hours for 
any other organization that 
you are involved in. There 
will also be some training 
before you start mentoring 
the children. 

The mentoring will take 
place at Keystone School 



District, Knox Pa. 

For students that do not 
drive, transportation will be 
provided. Students that 
drive will be compensated 
for the gas. 

According to Copeland, 
there will be eight Clarion 
students chosen for this 
scholarship and they are 
looking for 60 students that 
will need mentored by these 
eight college students. 

"Even though this is the 
first year for the scholarship 
program I am looking for- 
ward to continuing this pro- 
gram for more years to 
come," said Copeland. 

Students can obtain 
more information by email 
at Hcsmiles@keyknox.com. 



The Clarion Call Weather for Oct. 12 - 18 




7-Day Forfccast 



THURSDAY 

Few Showers 
High: 48 Low: 29 

FRIDAY 

Partly Cloudy 
High: 43 Low: 28 

SATURDAY 

Partly Cloudy 
High: 47 Low: 32 

SUNDAY 

Partly Cloudy 
High: 52 Low: 34 

MONDAY 

Few Showers 
High: 58 Low: 45 

TUESDAY 

Few Showers 
High: 60 Low: 48 

WEDNESDAY 

Few Showers 
High: 60 Low: 46 



a 




AW/ 




//////, 



Local ln-Do|)th Forecast 



Today we will see mostly cloudy skies with a 50% 
chance of showers, high temperature of 48°, humid- 
ity of 64% and a near record overnight low of 29". 
The record high temperature for today is 82° set in 
1954. The record low is 26° set in 1957. Friday, 
skies will be partly cloudy with a slight chance of 
rain and snow, high temperature of 43°, humidity of 
72% and a near record overnight low of 28°, The 
record low for Friday is 25° set in 1951 . 



Local Almanac Last Week 



D«te Hl/Lo HaaoM £lX£i8 

Wednesday, 10/4 75/50 63/44 0,17" 

Thursday, 10/5 64/47 63/44 0.00" 

Friday, 10/6 56/38 62/43 0.00" 

Saturday, 10/7 61/45 62/43 0,00" 

Sunday. 10/8 72/46 61/43 0.00" 

Monday. 10/9 73'49 61/42 0.01" 

Tuesday. 10/10 68/47 61/42 0.00" 

Total rainfall last week 0.18" 

Normal rainfall last week 0.71" 

Departure from normal -0.53" 

IhUK npoiteSfrom Du Bois-Jtfftrsm County Airport 




Party Forecast 



Friday ^ieln 

.|^ Partly Cloudy 
fldBa Temps: Low 30s 
^^^ Precip Chance: 20% 
Saturday Night 

Partly Cloudy 
Temps: Mid-30s 
Precip Chance: 10% 



Weather Trivi.i 



What two stales have record C\ 
highs no greater than 100 ' 
degrees? * 

iii/niH put in|«e|V ■.JtSWf 



Moon Phasi 



10/13 10/22 10/29 11/S 

€ 2006. Accessweathercom, Inc. 




Calling all 
students! 



Write cm opinion 
pitcofortht 



Ik 



mlFta 

lclle««*'ldita 
or for 




Let the student body know how 

you feel about a subject that Is 

Important to you or raise 

awareness about an 

oceuirence that is overtooited 

on campus on in the nation. 

Submissions are 
ahmaysacceptedl % 




Scholarship for $2,000 to be awarded to eight Ciarion students 



invM^itifflM as 
Mmdi^^ ^ th« 

Pablie &ifS^ 1^ 

liiaiiKmtibiof 

Octehff 2W6. 

M InfiMnoa^n can 

liw ftOc^Md ^ th» 



■ Oct. 8, an individual reported on Sunday afternoon 
that he was the victim of a "p\i Three 

individuala, which were not from Uiarion University, 
followed the male victim to hia room and itole hi» com- 
puter. The victim and the three individuaii auppoaedly 
had an altercation off'campua. All thrw individuals 
have been identified through the aurvteUence caaeraa. 
Investigation is ongoing and arrests are pending 



■ Kimberly Mogush, 18, of Trafford, Pa., was found to 
be intoxicated in Wilkinson Hall on Oct. 8 at 2- 11 a.m. 
Mogush was trans^rted to Clarion hospltid by ambu- 
lance and was charged with underage consumption and 
public drunkenness. 



■ Dorrean Watson, 19, of Pittsburgh, Pa was observed 
caning a case of beer beside Wilkinson Hall on Oct. 7 at 
li:i5 p.m. Watson was found to be immaet$^ exd cited 
for consumption and posession of alcohol. 



■ Jacob Grants, 21, has DUI charges pending. Grants 
was stopped by university police after he made a left 
turn at &th Avenue and Main Street on Oct. 6 at 1:26 
a.m. Grantz failed a field sobrtety check and PBT and 
was transported to Clarion Hcwpital for blood work. 



■ Joshua Meehan, 19, of Irwain, Pa., was cited| 
underage consumption on Oct. 6 at 1^26 a.m. MeelSS 
was a passenger in a vehicle that was stopped for a traf- 
ic violation. M^han admited to alcohol consumption^ 



■ Ru.Mell Colweil III, 20, of Sarver, ?&-, was cited for 
underage consumption of Oct. 6 at 1^26 a.m. after 
admitting to consuming alcohol and was found in poses- 
sion of a beer. Colweil was a passenger in a vehicle that 
was stopped for a traffic violation. 




B Elizabeth Rankin, 29, of Rimbersburg, Pa., was cf 
for public drunkenness on Oct. 6 at I'M) a.m. University 
police saw Rankin staggering on Greenville Avenue and 
when stopped by iwhce Rankin had slurred speech and 
a strong odor of alcohol on her breath. Rankin failed a 
PBT at high rate. 



■ Stefani Hibell, 20, of New Bethlehem, Pa., was iw 
posession of fllehohol on Oct. 5 at 6: 15 p.m. A known 
individual responsible for furnishing the alcohol is cur- 
rently being investigated. 



■ Oct. 5, university police are cnirrently investigating 
a theft that occured in the laundry room of Wilkinson 
Hall at 8:30 p.m. 



■ Oct. a, officers observed two individuals in the area 
of parking lot 8 in drug activity at 6:39 p.m. The indi- 
viduals were found to be in posession of what olBcere 
suspect as marijuana and paraphernH't-i Charges are 
pending Jab results. 




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our n«w item* Ik* Chiclwn SntckWtapf A Ic«d Co^ 
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fK^ ^Wt, N«fv«f4«Mth any 0«k«r «fMw 4?V/\ | 



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October 12. 2006 



Hffi CUkRION CAUL 



Page 3 



Siitin 



Developing more than Just our futures 





Brittnee Koebler 
News Editor 

s_bekoebler9clarion.edu 

It's that same question. 
That ever-pressing question 
that started around age five. 
Boys: you probably 
answered football players 
and firefighters. Girls: you 
most likely answered teach- 
ers and dancers. However, 
regardless of the always 
changing answer, the ques- 
tion remains the same: 
What are you going to be? It 
started as, "What are you 
going to be when you grow 
up, sweetie?" and trans- 
formed to, "What exactly do 
you intend to do with your 
degree once you graduate?" 

All in all, it remains the 
same. As the question 
becomes more prevalent and 
redundant, I begin to lose 
sight of the importance of 
that question. More so, 1 
found importance in a new 
question. Now, I'm left won- 
dering why people aren't 
asking something more 
important. Why not ask who 
I'm going to be "when 1 grow 
up?" That seems to out- 
weigh the importance of the 



aforementioned question. 

Now, don't mistake for a 
second that 1 strive to be 
ju.st as successful as the 
next college student. 

However, after much 
contemplation, 1 have to 
admit 1 truly find more 
importance in who I am, 
than what I will be. 

My generation is pro- 
gressing and growing 
according to the notion that 
the primary goal in life is to 
become the next biggest 
thing, in the next biggest 
field. We are all young CEOs 
in the making, right? We 
have come to the under- 
standing that you must be a 
college graduate, with an 
internship and extra curric- 
ular activities to boot, in 
order to achieve something 
in life. Once again. 1 have to 
defer from this idea because 
I can't comply with that con- 
cept. 

Maybe as a generation, 
or better yet, maybe our 
parents as a generation 
should begin to focus on the 
new concept of who we 
(their children) will become, 
as opposed to, what we will 
become. 

With the belief that our 
occupational title will define 
us as people, most overlook 



the type of person we are 
becoming. Working so hard 
to earn that degree, yet 
never working on our funda- 
mental character 

We have become a gen- 
eration so consumed by 
meaningless things; we neg- 
lect to address the most cru- 
cial matters, such as the 
moral fibers that have 
woven our identity. 

As a generation, with 
encouragement from the 
outside, we have become so 
caught up in the competi- 
tion of seeking out and 
obtaining the perfect posi- 
tion, in the perfect profes- 
sion. We are failing to rec- 
ognize that our lives are 
more purposeful, we have a 
bigger purpose then living 
to work. As Dad always said, 
"/ do not live to work, I work 
to live, so that I can do the 
important things in life." 
He's all too right. 

My parents have always 
been an example of hard- 
work and success, however, 
more importantly, they have 
been the perfect example of 
who I want to be. 

When did everyone lose 
sight of these important 
things in life? 

The current parents, as 
a generation, push to have 
their children obtain that 
degree to pursue that per- 
fect career. How contradict- 
ing are their lessons? We 
understand you simply 
want the best for us; howev- 
er, consider what you prac- 
tice and consider what you 
preach. 

Moms, Dads: rather than 
priding yourself in the level 



of accomphshments your off- 
spring have achieved thus 
far, revel in something much 
bigger. You have forever left 
your mark on the world 
through your child. Take 
pride in the individual you 
have shaped. Forget the 
degree; forget the presti- 
gious schools and achieve- 
ments; forget everything 
that seemed "important" 
and worthy of gloating. 
Take a look at what should 
be your biggest achieve- 
ment: the child you have 
shaped into an adult. Take 
pride not in the grades that 
are sent home, but the com- 
passionate person you have 
created. Take pride not in 
the awards and honors 
received, but in the 
upstanding citizen you have 
influenced. Take pride not 
in the degree and occupa- 
tional choice, but the virtu- 
ous and respectable adult 
you have raised. Having 
touched, impacted and 
influenced the lives of your 
children in a positive way. 
your children are unar- 
guably your greatest 
achievement, right? So, why 
should our achievements be 
any different? 

Even in this "day and 
age," you must not lose sight 
of what is truly important. 

Next time you find your- 
self pushing for your son or 
daughter to be someone 
elaborate on that, push for 
him or her to be someone 
worth knowing. 

The author is a sophomore 
communication major and 
News Editor of The Call. 



You have questions, they have answers 




Adrlenne Cain 
Columnist 

s acain@clarion.edu 



I spend a nice portion of 
every evening on the inter- 
net usually listening to 
Pandora.com and reading 
news articles. Sometimes 1 
visit YouTube, Myspace or 
Cracked.com and amuse 
myself aimlessly, but lately, 
after my email check, I have 
been heading straight for 
YahooIAnswers. 

You may have seen the 
commercial for Y!Answers 
on the TV. It features a 
woman who uses a new 
weed killer spray on her 
garden that was advertised 
on TV and it kills both her 
garden and a nearby tree. 
The scenario repeats but the 
second time she uses a 
spray she heard about on 
Y!Answers, the flowers grow 
and a dead dog is miracu- 
lously revived. Creepy, sure, 
but effective in proving their 
point; that trusting the 
council of others gets you 
much farther than trusting 
in advertising. 

If you poll people about 
why they bought their cell 
phone from a particular 
dealer, saw a certain film, or 
even visited a particular 
new restaurant, you'll dis- 
cover most people did things 
based upon recommenda- 
tions from friends or their 
peers. If you tell your 
friends you are going to say. 
the Chelsea area of NYC. 
you may get four or five sug- 



gestions for places to eat 
and places to shop. If you 
tell Y!Answers, you'll get 50 
places, descriptions, and 
votes to help you pick your 
plans. 

You can ask questions 
on science, art, history, tech- 
nology, beauty tips, dating 
tips or even delve into the 
realm of wordplay and rhet- 
oric. The questions I have 
asked range from how to 
clean a fish tank to sugges- 
tions for humidifying a room 
without a humidifier and 
more recently I asked for 
suggestions for good books 
pertaining to the Sengoku 
period of Japan. For every 
question I have asked, peo- 
ple have responded. 

Though not all of the 
answers are great or perti- 
nent, you do get a great 
number of answers. One 
nice thing about Y!Answers 
is that other people will help 
you search for information 
sometimes if they don't pos- 
sess it for themselves. It's a 
little like having the mafia 
information network at your 
at your disposal, on the con- 
dition that the mafia was 
half comprised of clinical 
idiots with no grammar or 
spelling skills. 

I'm not saying that you 
aren't going to get good, 
informative answers there, 
but you will get your share 
of heinous idiots, bigots, and 
religious fanatics, which 
pretty much includes the 
previous two classifications. 
You'll see racists, homo- 
phobes, fundamentalists, 
losers and jingoists by the 
dozens. You'll get nasty 
questions and nasty 
answers and may lose some 
faith in humanity and the 
educational system, assum- 
ing of course that at this 
point in your life you had 
any left. You'll find plenty of 
people who don't realize 



that in any other form that 
an text message, using gr8 
as 'great' or thx as 'thanks' is 
just lazy and dumb. In fact, 
thanks to that laziness, a 
good quarter of the ques- 
tions are almost wholly 
illegible, which is as humou- 
rus as it is depressing. 
You'll also find some hilari- 
ous or some dumb (and like- 
ly fake) questions like: 

1. "my stalker and i are 
fighting again — do you 
think we should go to coun- 
sehng?" ■ Darkangelllll 

2. "do people really actu- 
ally get money symbols in 
their eyes? or is it just in 
cartoons?" -Hank 

3. "My stapler is having 
feelings of inadequacy since 
tape dispenser was upgrad- 
ed. What should 1 do?" ■ The 
What Should I Do Loser. 

Or alternately, the ques- 
tions that you just have to 
pray are fake, such as: 

1. "wat do i do when im 
being raged every single day 
by a guy because i said no to 
have sex with him?" -mira 

2. "for someone to pitch 
his/her idea into screenplay 
need to use good English 
grammar?" - marioanto- 
nio438 

3. "am i racist 4 wat i am 
about 2 say? (hope it dsnt 
take any offense 2 anyl) 
cont.frm bottom. & datimin- 
dawrong?" -wolfgirl 

And yes, those were all 
real questions posted on the 
site. 

It isn't a hopeless 
arrangement, however. In a 
nice twist that makes people 
actually give answers the 
way they get them, 
Y!Answers has a point sys- 
tem that limits the number 
of questions you can ask 
based upon the number of 
points you have. Two points 
are awarded for answering 
questions, and if your 
answer is the best you get 



ten points, which is a great 
way to promote real 
thoughtful answers. 

Of course, you can also 
'report' people who are abus- 
ing the system. With enough 
reports to a particular post 
or about a particular user, 
administrators investigate 
and usually remove the user 
from the system if the 
offense is severe or penalize 
them. Y!Answers cannot get 
every idiot riddling the site, 
but they can chip away at 
some of the worst. 

Overall, it is a pretty 
nice system in which to 
work and play. Y!Answers 
makes it into a little game 
so don't be surprised when 
you find yourself hanging 
out trying to answer ques- 
tions and learning new 
things. It's nice to receive 
knowledge and give it, pro- 
vided of course you have 
anything good to say. It's 
easy to spend an hour there 
just wandering from ques- 
tion to question and answer 
to answer I know because I 
spend an hour there every- 
day now. 

While you may not be 
able to answe"r questions on 
metaphysics and perhaps 
you may not know why hot 
water freezes faster than 
cold water, YIAnswers 
assures you that even your 
usually useless knowledge 
of pop culture and sports 
can help someone out there. 
And perhaps, while you are 
answering someone's ques- 
tion about the song in the 
last night's episode of 
"Grey's Anatomy" someone 
could be telling you what 
Klinefelter's Syndrome is all 
about. That, my friends, is a 
nice exchange of informa- 
tion. 

PS. While writing this 
article, I introduced my 
roommate to YlAnswers. 
She hasn't been off it since. 



flnljjllm III Ihr ^iililiir iinil I all III! liiu 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: clarloncall.clarion.edu E-mail: call@clarion.edii 

Executive Board . 

2006 - 2007 

Lindsay Grystar, Amy Kaylor, 

EdItor-ln-Chief Business Manager 

Tina SIckler, 
Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desmond, 
Features Editor 



Michael Balchin, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
Photos & Graphics Editor 

Josh Doran, 
Online Editor 



Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 

Dr. Susan Hilton 
Adviser 



Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 



Staff 

Hv^it: Natalie Kennell, Kelly Pennisi, Adam Mohney, 
Shakira O'Neil, Krystal Finkbeiner Feature*: Danielle 
Butcherine E ntertainm ent: Dominic Giallombardo, Emily 
Aaron, Robyn Gray, Grace Regalado l^iortK Chris Parks, 
Robert Rankin, Katelyn Munrean Cop y Editing; Michele 
Straub, Nicole Bovaird, Adrienne Cain Adverttelntf ; Lauren 
Couch, Courtney Krol, Jenna Peno, iVIike Smith BtMlnesa; 
Sarah Sleiski, Stephanie Corso, Shawn Turner, Ben Elliot 
Photography and Graphics: Bethany Ross, Mike Cauvet, 
MIsha Snyder, Jenifer Pobiete, Phil Drelick, Thomas Fair 
areutatlon: Eric Levy, Allison Kerr, Nicole Lawrence, John 
Blumer, Ryan Bridge, Bryan Bingham, Steve Cooper 

Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
CaH is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and obscen- 
ity; the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They hiust be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester wil! be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call Is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available On campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 

■ Opinions expressed In this 
publication are those of the writer or speak- 
er, and do not necessarily reflect the opin- 
ions of the newspaper staff, student body, 
Clarion University or the community. 






^rticufating Sj^aces: Toets 
an(( Artists Interacting 
witfi their ^Environment 

Oct. 16-18 

Vniversity CjaCCery, LevefJA, 
Carlson Library 

Check out Clarion s J^ewswire 
for more infomation 




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Julia Ka^Hl 



fttincta Jahhch Wt\lc\ Jiklith Volimer 



Page 2 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



October 12, 2006 



October 12. 2006 



Im 



Faculty Senate amends Students Rights and 
Regulations, Grade Appeal Process Wording 



Adam Mohney 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ajmohney@ciarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 9 - The 
Faculty Senate met on Oct. 
9 and approved a revision of 
the wording of the (Srade 
Appeal Process section of 
the Student Rights and 
Regulations Handbook. 

The amendment was 
recommended by Academic 
Standards. Dr. Todd 
Pfannestiel, chair of the 
Faculty Senate, introduced 
the revision in absence of 
Academic Standard chair 
Dr. Sally Sentner. 

This change makes a 
clarification under the 
Student Rights and 
Regulations handbook, with 
regards to the grade appeal 
process as well as the aca- 
demic honesty policy." 
Pfannestiel said. 

Pfannestiel stressed 
that there were no changes 
taking effect, but rather a 
rewording to be sure stu- 
dents were aware of the dis- 
tinction between academic 
honesty and grade appeal. 

"The language did not 
exactly mirror what was 
going on with the flow chart 
that highlights the process 
of the handling of a violation 
of academic dishonesty," 
said Pfannestiel. 

There was not any dis- 
crepancy with the language 
being clear to students on 
whether it was a grade 
appeal or a question of 
whether or not it was an 
appeal to the accusation of 
academic dishonesty," he 
said. 

Pfannestiel said profes- 
sors are obligated to file a 



report if punitive action is 
taken, so that it is on the 
student's record. Many pro- 
fessors attending the meet- 
ing were not aware of this 
policy, which passed the 
Senate. Pfannestiel said an 
effort would be made to pub- 
licize the policy. 

Pfannestiel also empha- 
sized that a student always 
has the right to appeal accu- 
sations of academic dishon- 
esty and that past instances 
on the students record will 
not be taken into account 
until after the student has 
been convicted. 

"This clarification does 
not change the process in 
any way; however, it makes 
clear the steps that students 
may take should they wish 
to appeal a course grade or 
face disciplinary measures 
related to a charge of aca- 
demic dishonesty. Students 
can now more easily under- 
stand the processes and the 
role of the Office of Judicial 
and Mediation Services in 
these events," Pfannestiel 
said. 

The changes will be 
found in the Student Rights 
and Regulations Handbook. 

Pfannestiel also offered 
the president's report 
because President Joseph 
Grunenwald was in 
Washington D.C. serving as 
a member of the board of 
Governors for the 

Renaissance Group. 

Pfannestiel announced 
Grunenwald has approved 
the search committees to 
select a new dean for the 
College of Education and 
Human Services and the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 
Grunenwald also appointed 



three additional members to 
each search committee. 

The additions to the 
search committee for the 
selection of a new dean for 
the (\illege of Education 
and Human Services are 
William Bailey, Dean of 
Enrollment Management; 
Paul Bylaska, Vice 

President for Finance and 
Administration; Dr. Jeffrey 
Waple, Director of Campus 
Life. 

The additions to the 
search committee for the 
selection of a dean for the 
College of Arts and Sciences 
are Dr. Rashelle Karp, 
Assistant Vice-President for 
Academic Affairs; Dr. Chris 
Reber, Executive Dean of 
Venango Campus; Dr. 
James Pesek, Interim Dean 
of the College of Business 
Administration. 

Pfannestiel also 

announced the ground- 
breaking for the 
Biotechnology Business 
Development Center, which 
is scheduled for Oct. 24. The 
building and architectural 
work will be done through- 
out the winter with the 
buildings construction set 
to begin next spring, accord- 
ing to Grunenwald. 

In addition, the bidding 
for the new science building 
will begin on Oct. 9 and end 
on Nov. 8. If there is a suc- 
cessful bidder, the site 
preparation will begin this 
winter, a series of construc- 
tion will take place in the 
spring, with groundbreak- 
ing held in "better weather" 
in the spring, according to 
Pfannestiel via 

Grunenwald. 

The Student Senate 



report was offered by 
Student Senator Joshua 
Pierce. Pierce said the 
Student Senate approved 
four financial matters. 
Three of the approvals were 
for trips and the other was 
to purchase a video scouting 
program for the womens 
basketball team. 

Student Affairs chair 
Jamie Phillips announced 
Lori Taylor was elected 
chair of Student 

Subcomittee Activities on 
Oct. 4. 

Committee on 

Committee and Rules (CCR) 
chair Dr. Elisabeth Donato 
said the call for nominations 
for one representative for 
the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the College of 
Education and Human 
Services to the Faculty 
Development Committee 
was sent last Monday. The 
deadline for nominations 
will be Oct. 13. 

Dr. Barry Sweet report- 
ed the Budget Committee 
has been discussing CUPs 
allotment for PASSHE 
Performance Funding. 

Sweet says the committee 
feels they were not given a 
deserving grant, judging by 
the size of Slippery Rock 
University's grant. 

Dr. Sue Courson offered 
a report on Institutional 
Resources. She reported 
that the Peirce Science 
Center parking lot will not 
close until the end of the 
Fall semester. 

The next meeting will be 
Oct. 23 at 3:30 p.m. in the 
Enid Dennis room of Hart 
Chapel. 



Scholarship for $2,000 to be awarded to eight Clarion students 



Krystal Finkbeiner 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_knfinkbein@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 10 - Clarion 
University students are 
encouraged to apply for a 
new PHEi\i\ scholarship 
offered to only Clarion 
University students. 

According to Holman 
Copeland, director of 
Keystones smiles, PHEAA 
and PennSERVE are collab- 
orating for the first time to 
put together a scholarship 
program to help younger 
children in grades six 
through eight. This scholar- 
ship worth $2,000 dollars to 
each of eight Clarion 
University students. 

The scholarship is try- 
ing to mentor younger chil- 
dren and open their eyes to 
different careers available 
before they reach college. 

This will help undecided 
majors when registering for 
college. 



"This scholarship is 
designed to help students 
with their school work but. 
their main focus is to show 
the kids career choices," 
said Copeland. 

This opportunity allows 
Clarion students to take the 
kids outside of the class- 
room and give them hands 
on experiences. 

"There will be many 
times where the children 
will be taken on field trips 
such as Clarion football 
games. This will show what 
goes on in-order for a foot- 
ball game to happen. The 
people behind the scenes 
that make it run. The 

children can also get a 
chance to shadow a Clarion 
University student for a day 
to see what it is like to be a 
student and the tasks they 
undergo," said Copeland. 

You must at least be a 
full time Clarion student, be 
able to commit 300 hours 
fall and spring semester 



three times a week for two 
to three hours a week. The 
hours will be from 3 p.m. to 
6 p.m. 

"This is the first year we 
are having this scholarship, 
we are trying it in Clarion 
and other colleges as well. 
PHEAA actually 

approached Americore 

about having the opportuni- 
ty to think about your 
career before you enter col- 
lege," said, Copeland. 

According to Copeland 
everyone involved benefits 
from the program but, 
PennSERVE benefits from 
this program the most look- 
ing for the opportunity for 
college kids to contribute 
hours, which will count as 
community service hours for 
any other organization that 
you are involved in. There 
will also be some training 
before you start mentoring 
the children. 

The mentoring will take 
place at Keystone School 



District, Knox Pa. 

For students that do not 
drive, transportation will be 
provided. Students that 
drive will be compensated 
for the gas. 

According to Copeland, 
there will be eight Clarion 
students chosen for this 
scholarship and they are 
looking for 60 students that 
will need mentored by these 
eight college students. 

"Even though this is the 
first year for the scholarship 
program I am looking for- 
ward to continuing this pro- 
gram for more years to 
come," said Copeland. 

Students can obtain 
more information by email 
at Hcsmiles@keyknox.com. 



The Clarion Call Weather for Oct. 12-18 



7-Day Forecast 




^M^ 




THURSDAY 

Few Showers 
High: 48 Low; 29 

FRIDAY 

Pailly Cloudy 
High: 43 Low: 28 

SATURDAY 

Pailly Cloudy 
lligh:47 1.ow:32 

SUNDAY 

Partly Cloudy 
High ■>: Low 34 

MONDAY 

Few Showers 
High: 5X Low: 45 

TUESDAY 

Few Showers 
High W) Low: 48 

WEDNESDAY 

Few Showers 
Hitth W) i tnv 4(S 



Local In-Depth Forecast 



Today we will see mostly cloudy skies with a 501u 
chance of showers, high temperature of 48". humid- 
ity of 64°ii and a near record overnight low of 24". 
The record high temperature for today is 82" set in 
1954. The record low is 26° set in 1957. Friday, 
skies will be partly cloudy with a slight chance of 
rain and snow, high temperature of 43", humidity of 
72° and a near record overnight low of 28" Fhe 
record low for Fridav is 25" set in 1951 



Local Almanac Last Week 



Date Hi/Lu 

Wednesday, 10 4 75 ^O 

Thursday. 10 5 64 47 

Friday, 10 6 56/38 

Saturday. 10' 7 61.45 

Sunday. I0'8 72/46 

Monday. 10/9 73 49 

Tuesday. HI. 10 68 47 

Total rainfall last week 0. 1 8" 

Normal rainfall last w eck . , . , , 0.7 1 " 

Departure from normal -0 53" 

Data reported from Ou Bois-Jeffenon County Airport 



Party Forecast 



Fridax Nighl 

4^k Partly CToudv 

_j^|B Temps: Low 30s 
^^flj^^ Precip C hance: 20O0 
Saturday Night 

^^^^ Partly C loudy 
_^W[ leinps: Mid-30s 
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' 2in)t\ 4ut'ss»t'iJthtri (ini. Inc 




Calling all 
students! 

Write an opinion 
piece for the 



Icitcis " ^ {ditci 




or for 



Let the student body know how 

you feel about a subject that is 

important to you or raise 

awareness about an 

occurrence that is overlooi(ed 

on campus on in the nation. 

Submissions are %^ 



always accepted! 



L 



I 




■mpiiiHBiiiii 

The Ckrion CaU 
provides a synopsis 

of aU criminal 

investigations as 

conducted by the 

Clarion University 

Public Safety for 

the montJb of 

October 2006. 

All information can 

be accesMd on the 

Public Safety Web 

page. 



■ Oct. 8, an individual reported on Sunday afternoon 
that he was the victim of a "push in" robbery. Three 
individuals, which were not from Clarion University, 
followed the male victim to his room and stole his com- 
puter. The victim and the three individuals supposedly 
had an altercation off-campus. All three individuals 
have been identified through the surviellence cameras. 
Investigation is ongoing and arrests are pending. 



■ Kimberly Mogush, 18, of Trafford, Pa., was found to 
be intoxicated in Wilkinson Hall on Oct. 8 at 2: 11 a.m. 
Mogush was transported to Clarion hospital by ambu- 
lance and was charged with underage consumption and 
public drunkenness. 



■ Dorrean Watson, 19, of Pittsburgh, Pa was observed 
earring a case of beer beside Wilkinson Hall on Oct. 7 at 
11:15 p.m. Watson was found to be intoxicated and cited 
for consumption and posession of alcohol. 



■ Jacob Grantz, 21, has DUI charges pending. Grantz 
was stopped by university police after he made a left 
turn at 9th Avenue and Main Street on Oct. 6 at 1:26 
a.m. Grantz failed a field sobriety check and PBT and 
was transported to Clarion Hospital for blood work. 



■ Joshua Meehan, 19, of Irwain, Pa., was cited for 
underage consumption on Oct. 6 at 1^26 a.m. Meehan 
was a passenger in a vehicle that was stopped for a traf- 
fic violation. Meehan admited to alcohol consumption. 



■ Russell Colwell III, 20, of Sarver, Pa., was cited for 
underage consumption of Oct. 6 at i:26 a.m. after 
admitting to consuming alcohol and was found in poses- 
sion of a beer. Colwell was a passenger in a vehicle that 
was stopped for a traffic violation. 



■ Elizabeth Rankin, 29, of Rimbersburg, Pa., was cited 
for public drunkenness on Oct. 5 at i:30 a.m. University 
police saw Rankin staggering on Greenville Avenue and 
when stopped by police Rankin had slurred speech and 
a strong odor of alcohol on her breath. Rankin failed a 
PBT at high rate. 



■ Stefani Hibell, 20, of New Bethlehem, Pa., was in 
posession of alchohol on Oct. 5 at 6: 15 p.m. A known 
individual responsible for furnishing the alcohol is cur- 
rently being investigated. 



■ Oct. 5, university poUce are currently investigating 
a theft that occured in the laundry room of Wilkinson 
Hall at 8:30 p.m. 



■ Oct. 3, officers observed two individuals in the area 
of parking lot 3 in drug activity at 6:39 p.m. The indi- 
viduals were found to be in posession of what officers 
suspect as marijuana and paraphernalia. Charges are 
pending lab results. 



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THE CLARION CALL 



tfiiiii 



Developing more than just our futures 





the typi- (it porson wi- aro of accompli.-^hment.syour off- 

iH'coniing. Working .so hard spring havo achieved thus 

to earn that degrt-f. yet fur, ivvvl in simwthin^mntch 

never working on our t'unda- higpi,,- You have forever left 

mental character. your mark on the worlii 

We have become a gen- through your child. Take 

elation so consumed by pride in the individual you 



Brittnee Koebler 
News Editor 

s_beKoei)ler@clanon ecu. 



It'8 that same (juestion. 
That ever-pressing question 
that started around age five. 
Boys: you probably 

answered football players 
and firefighters. (!irls: you 
most likely answered teach- 
ers and dancers. However, 
regardless of the always 
changing answer, the ques- 
tion remains the same: 
W'hnt are you going t,) he! It 
started as, "Wh.tt uv you 
going to be when you grow 
up. sweetie?" and trans- 
formed to, "What exactly do 
you intend to do with your 
degree once you gniduiite?" 

All in all, it remains the 
same. .\s the question 
becomes more prevalent and 
redundant, i begin to lose 
sight of the importance of 
that question. More so. I 
found importance \n a new- 
question. Now, I'm left won- 
dering why people aren't 
asking something more 
important. Why not ask who 
I'm going to /je"when I grow 
up?" That seems to out 
weigh the unportance of the 



aforementioned question. 

Now. don't mistake for a 
second that 1 strive to he 
just as successful as the 
next college student. 

However, after much 
contemplation. I have to 
admit I truly find more 
importance in who I am. 
than what I will he. 

My generation is pro- 
gressing and growing 
according to the notion that 
the primary goal in life is to 
become the ne.xt biggest 
thing, in the next biggest 
field. We are all young CEOs 
in the making, right? We 
have come to the under- 
standing that you must be a 
college graduate, with an 
internship and extra curric- 
ular activities to boot, in 
order to achieve something 
in life. Once again. 1 have to 
defer from this idea because 
I can't comply with that con- 
cept. 

Maybe as a generation. 
or better yet, maybe our 
parents as a generation 
should begin to focus on the 
new concept of who we 
(their children) will become. 
H!" opposed to, what we will 
become. 

With the belief that our 
occupational title will define 
us as people, most overlook 



meaningless things: we neg- 
lect to address the most cru- 
cial matters, such as the 
moral fibers that have 
woven our identity. 

As a generation, with 
encouragement from the 
outside, we have become so 
caught up in the competi- 
tion of seeking out and 
obtaining the perfect posi- 
tion, in the perfect profes- 
sion. We are failing to rec- 
ognize that our lives are 
more purposeful, we have a 
bigger purpose then living 
to work. As Dad always said, 
'7 do not live to work. 1 work 
to live, so thiit I am do the 
important things in life." 
He's all too right. 

My parents have always 
been an example of hard- 
work and success, however, 
more impcji'tantlj'. they have 
been the perfect example of 
who I want to be. 

When did everyone lose 
sight of these important 
things in life? 

The current parents, as 
a generation, push to have 
their children obtain that 
degree to pursue that per- 
fect career. How contradict- 
ing are their lessons? We 
understand you simply 
want the best for us: howev- 
er, consider what you prac- 
tice and consider what you 
preach. 

Moms, Dads: rather than 
priding yourself in the leve 



have shaped. Forget the 
degree: forget the presti- 
gious .schools and achieve- 
ments: forget everything 
that seemed "important" 
and worthy of gloating. 
Take a look at what should 
be your biggest achieve- 
ment: the child you have 
shaped into an adult. Take 
pride not in the grades that 
are .sent home, but the com- 
passionate person you have 
created. Take pride not in 
the awards and honors 
received, but in the 
upstanding citizen you have 
influenced. Take pride not 
in the degree and occupa- 
tional choice, but the virtu- 
ous and respectable adult 
you have raised. Having 
touched, impacted and 
influenced the lives of your 
children in a positive way. 
your children are unar- 
guably your greatest 
achievement, right? So, why 
should our achievements be 
any different? 

Even in this "day and 
age," you must not lose sight 
of what is truly important. 

Next time you find your- 
self pushing for your son or 
daughter to fee someone 
elaborate on that, push for 
him or her to be someone 
worth knowing. 

The author is a sophomore 
communication major and 
News Editor of The Call. 



You have questions, they have answers 




Adrienne Cain 
Columnist 

s_acaln@clarion.edu 



1 spend a nice portion of 
every evening on the inter- 
net usually listening to 
Pandora. com and reading 
news articles. Sometimes I 
visit You^Pube, Myspace or 
Cracked.com and amuse 
myself aimlessly, but lately, 
after my email check, I have 
been heading straight for 
YahooIAnswers. 

You may have seen the 
commercial for YIAnswers 
on the TV. It features a 
woman who uses a new- 
weed killer spray on her 
garden that was advertised 
on TV and it kills both her 
garden and a nearby tree. 
The scenario rc^peats but the 
second time .-he uses a 
spray she heard about on 
YIAnswers, the flowers grow 
and a dead dog is miracu- 
lously revived. Creepy, sure, 
but effective in proving their 
point: that trusting the 
council of others gets you 
much farther than trusting 
in advertising. 

If you poll people about 
why they bought their cell 
phone from a particular 
dealer, .saw a certain film, or 
even visited a particular 
new restaurant, you'll dis- 
cover most peo|)le did things 
based upon recommenda- 
tions from friends oi theit 
peers. If you tell your 
friends you are going to say. 
the Chelsea area of N^'C. 
you may get four or five sug- 



gestions for places to eat 
and places to shop. If you 
tell YIAnswers. you'll get 50 
places, descriptions, and 
votes to help you pick your 
plans. 

You can ask questions 
on science, art, history, tech- 
nology, beauty tips, dating 
tips or even delve into the 
realm of wordplay and rhet- 
oric. The questions 1 have 
asked range from how to 
clean a fish tank to sugges- 
tions for humidifying a room 
without a humidifier and 
more recently 1 asked for 
suggestions for good books 
pertaining to the Sengoku 
period of Japan. For every 
question I have asked, peo- 
ple have responded. 

Though not all of the 
answers are great or perti- 
nent, you do get a great 
number of answers. One 
nice thing about YIAnswers 
is that other people will help 
you search for information 
sometimes if they don't pos- 
sess it for themselves. It's a 
little like having the mafia 
information network at your 
at your disposal, on the con- 
dition that the mafia was 
half comprised of clinical 
idiots with no grammar or 
•spelling skills. 

I'm not saying that you 
aren't going to get good, 
informative answers there, 
but \-ou will get your share 
of heinous idiots, bigots, and 
religious fanatics, which 
pretty much includes the 
previous two classifications. 
You'll see racists, homo- 
phobes, fundamentalists, 
losers and jingoists by the 
dozens. You'll get nasty 
questions and nasty 
answers and may lose some 
faith in humanity and the 
educational .system, assum- 
ing of course that at this 
point in your life you had 
any left. You'll find plenty of 
people who don't realize 



that in any oiner form that 
an text message, using grS 
as "great" or thx as "thanks' is 
just lazy and dumb. In fact, 
thanks to that laziness, a 
good cjuarter of the ques- 
tions are almost wholly 
illegible, which is as humou- 
rus as it is depressing. 
You'll also find some hilari- 
ous or some dumb (and like- 
ly fake) questions like: 

1. "my stalker and i are 
fighting again — do you 
think we should go to coun- 
sehng?" - Darkangelllll 

2. "do people really actu- 
ally get money symbols in 
their eyes? or is it just in 
cartoons?" -Hank 

3. "My stapler is having 
feelings of inadequacy since 
tape dispenser was upgrad- 
ed. What should 1 tUK^" - The 
What Should 1 Do Loser. 

Or alternately, the ques- 
tions that you just have to 
pray are fake, such as: 

1. ""wat do i do when im 
being raged every single day 
by a guy because i said no to 
have sex with him'.'" -mira 

2. "for someone to pitch 
his/her idea into screenplay 
need to use good English 
grammar?" - marioanto- 
nio}38 

3. "am i racist 4 wat i am 
about 2 say? (hope it dsnt 
take any offense 2 any!) 
cont.frm bottom. & datimin- 
dawrong'?" -wolfgirl 

And yes. those were all 
real questions posted on the 
site. 

It isn't a hopeless 
arrangement, however. In a 
nice twist that makes people 
actually give answers the 
way they get them, 
YIAnswers has a point .sys- 
tem that limits the number 
of questions you can ask 
based upon the number of 
points you have. Two points 
are awarded for answering 
questions, and if your 
answer is the best you get 



ten points, which is a great 
way to promote real 
thoughtful answers. 

Of course, you can also 
'report' people who are abus- 
ing the system. With enough 
reports to a particular post 
or about a particular user, 
administrators investigate 
and usually remove the user 
from the system if the 
offense is severe or penalize 
them. YIAnswers cannot get 
every idiot riddling the site, 
but they can chip away at 
.some of the worst. 

Overall, it is a pretty 
nice system in which to 
work and play. YIAnswers 
makes it into a little game 
so don't be surprised when 
you find yourself hanging 
out trying to answer ques- 
tions and learning new 
things. It's nice to receive 
knowledge and give it. pro- 
vided of course you have 
anything good to say. It's 
easy to spend an hour there 
just wandering from ques- 
tion to question and answer 
to answer. 1 know because I 
spend an hour there every- 
day now. 

While you may not he 
able to answer questions on 
metaphysics and perhaps 
you may not know why hot 
water freezes faster than 
cold water, YI.Answors 
assures you that even your 
usually useless knowledg(> 
of pop culture and sports 
can help someone out there. 
And perhaps, while you are 
answering someone's ques- 
tion about the song in the 
last night's episode of 
■"Grey's Anatomy" someone 
could be telling you what 
Klinefelter's Syndrome is all 
about. That, my friends, is a 
nice exchange of informa- 
tion. 

P.S. While writing this 
article. 1 introduced my 
roommate to YIAnswers. 
She hasn't been off it since. 



Page 3 



fliiiiiilLHlmliilliHliiriiiiilliilliiiik 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion. PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax; 814-393-2557 

Web: clariQncall.clarion.edu E-mail: cdll@clarion.edu 

Executive Board 
2006 - 2007 

Lindsay Grystar. Amy Kaylor, 

Business Manager 



Editor-in-Chief 



Tina Sickler, 
Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desmond, 
Features Editor 

Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 



Michael Balchin, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
Photos & Graphics Editor 

Josh Doran, 
Online Editor 

Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 



Dr. Susan Hilton 
Adviser 

Staff 
Nem: Natalie Kennell. Kelly Pennlsi. Adam Mohney, 
Shakira O'Neil. Krystal Finkbeiner Features: Danielle 
Butcherine EntgrtaLrunenJt: Dominic GiaHombardo. Emily 
Aaron, Robyn Gray, Grace Regalado S(»rts: Chris Parks, 
Robert Rankin, Katelyn Munrean Copy^ Editing; IVIichele 
Straub, Nicole Bovaird, Adrienne Cain AdyertMng: Lauren 
Couch, Courtney Krol, Jenna Reno. Mike Smith B usiness: 
Sarah Sielski. Stephanie Corso, Shawn Turner, Ben Elliot 
EhetQgrjiphy_a!MLJSjaehl!Si Bethany Ross, Mike Cauvel, 
Misha Snyder, Jenifer Poblete, Phil Drelick. Thomas Fair 
C IrCMlatton; Eric Levy, Allison Kerr, Nicole Lawrence, John 
Blumer, Ryan Bridge, Bryan Bingham, Steve Cooper 

Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and obscen- 
ity; the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 

H Opinions expressed in this 
publication are those of the witer or speak- 
er, and do not necessarily reflect the opin- 
ions of the newspaper staff, student body. 
Clarion University or the community. 



9< 



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Pag 



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Tiffi CLARION CALL 



October 12. 2006 



October 12. 2006 



Tffl CLARION CALL 



Pages 



Possible misinformed statements don't go unnoticed 



Ryan Souder 

S_r80uder®clarion.edu 



As the election season 
heats up and both the 
Democratic and Ftepublican 
parties jockey for votes, we 
as students and citizens, 
must make absolute sure 
that information we receive 
is taken into context of who 
produces that information 
and what they hope to 
achieve from it. In the 
September 28, 2006 issue of 
the Clarion Call article was 



printed on the front page 
entitled •Tollege 

Republicans Revamp Club." 
While I happy that more 
students are getting 
involved in the political 
process I must insist that 
students strive for the facts. 
The Article has a few glar- 
ing misinformed state- 
ments and/or outright lies. 
The biggest lie that 
stuck out was the state- 
ment that the College 
Republicans have the 
largest membership of any 
political group on campus. 
The College Republicans 



are NOT the largest politi- 
cal group membership-wise 
on campus. The Young 
Deniocrats has a member- 
ship (comprised of email 




lists and RSO list) of 96. 

The College 

Republicans claim to have 
80 members (I'm not sure 
where they got that esti- 
mate) and while I am not a 
math major 1 do know 96 to 



be larger than 80. While 1 
am biased member of the 
student body as the 
President of the Young 
Democrats, I still hold true 
to certain values. This is 
why I , along with my fellow 
young democrats, are who 
we are. We don't appreciate 
disseminated information, 
outright lies, or other mech- 
anisms to distort, This is 
the reason I am not allow- 
ing such an article to go 
unchallenged even if it does 
seem a bit petty. All I'm 
asking is that this election 
season given the facts that 



voters (student voters espe- 
cially), trust their gut, find 
the truth, and vote for the 
right candidate on 
November 7. For 

anyone interested in a polit- 
ical organization that will 
NOT lie to your face, the 
Young Democrats meet 
every Tuesday in Room 118 
Founders Hall at 6p.m. 

-Ryan Souder 

President 

Clarion Young Democrats 

EdiMsJMeLTbe informa- 
tion that appeared in the 



September 28 issue of The 
Call was quoted directly 
from a Press Release from 
the Clarion County 
Repubhcan Committee, and 
reads "... the College 
Republican Club on the 
campus of Clarion 
University now boasts the 
largest membership of any 
political organization on the 
campus." If there are any 
further questions about this 
information, you may con- 
tact Greg Mortimer at 
(814)-226-4000 Ext. 2500. 



In search of a North Korea policy 



William J. Perry 

Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

North Korea's declared 
nuclear bomb test program 
will increase the incentives 
for other nations to go 
nuclear, will endanger secu- 
rity in the region and could 
ultimately result in nuclear 
terrorism. While this test is 
the culmination of North 
Korea's long-held aspiration 
to become a nuclear ppwer, 
it also demonstrates the 
failure of the Bush adminis- 
tration's policy toward that 
country. For almost six 
years this policy has been a 
strange combination of 
harsh rhetoric and inaction. 

President Bush, early in 
his first term, dubbed North 
Korea a member of the "axis 
of evil" and made disparag- 
ing remarks about Kim Jong 
II. He said he would not tol- 
erate a North Korean 
nuclear weapons program, 
but he set no bounds on 
North Korean actions. 



The most important such 
limit would have been on 
reprocessing spent fuel from 
North Korea's reactor to 
make plutonium. The 
Clinton administration 
declared in 1991 that if 
North Korea reprocessed, it 
would be crossing a "red 
line." and it threatened mil- 
itary action if that line was 
crossed. The North Koreans 
responded to that pressure 
and began negotiations that 
led to the Agreed 
Framework. The Agreed 
Framework did not end 
North Korea's aspirations 
for nuclear weapons, but it 
did result in a major delay. 
For more than eight years, 
under the Agreed 

Fi'amework, the spent fuel 
was kept in a storage pond 
under international super- 
vision. 

Then in 2002, the Bush 
administration discovered 
the existence of a covert pro- 
gram in uranium, evidently 
an attempt to evade the 
Agreed Framework. This 
program, while potentially 



serious, would have led to a 
bomb at a very slow rate, 
compared with the more 
mature plutonium program. 
Nevertheless, the adminis- 
tration unwisely stopped 
compliance with the Agreed 
Framework. In response the 
North Koreans sent the 
inspectors home and 
announced their intention 
to reprocess. The adminis- 
tration deplored the action 
but set no "red line." North 
Korea made the plutonium. 

The administration also 
said early this summer that 
a North Korean test of long- 
range missiles was unac- 
ceptable. North Korea con- 
ducted a multiple-launch 
test of missiles on July 4. 
Most recently, the adminis- 
tration said a North Korean 
test of a nuclear bomb would 
be unacceptable. A week 
later North Korea conducted 
its tlrst test. 

It appears that the 
administration is deeply 
divided on how to deal with 
North Korea, with some 
favoring negotiation and 



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others economic and politi- 
cal pressure to force a 
regime change. As a result, 
while the administration 
was willing to send a repre- 
sentative to the six-party 
talks organized by the 
Chinese in 2003, it had no 
apparent strategy for deal- 
ing with North Korea there 
or for providing leadership 
to the other parties. In the 
meantime, it increased eco- 
nomic pressure on 
Pyongyang. Certainly an 
argument can be made for 
such pressure, but it would 
be naive to think it could 
succeed without the support 
of the Chinese and South 
Korean governments, nei- 
ther of which backs such 
action. North Korea, sens- 
ing the administration's 
paralysis, has moved ahead 
with an aggressive and dan- 
gerous nuclear program. 

So what can be done 
now that might have a con- 
structive influence on North 
Korea's behavior? The 
attractive alternatives are 
behind us. There should and 
will be a U.N. resoluiion 
condemning' the test. The 
United Nations may 
respond to calls from the 
United States and Japan for 
strong sanctions to isolate 
North Korea and cut off 
trade with it. But North 
Korea is already the most 
isolated nation in the world, 
and its government uses 
this isolation to its advan- 
tage. Stronger sanctions on 
materials that might be of 



use to the nuclear program 
are reasonable, but the 
horse is already out of the 
barn. Economic sanctions to 
squeeze North Korea would 
increase the suffering of its 
people but would have little 
effect on the elite. In any 
event, they would be effec- 
tive only if China and South 
Korea fully participated, 
and they have shown no 
inclination to do so. 

There will be calls to 
accelerate our national mis- 
sile defense program. But 
the greatest danger to the 
United States from this pro- 
gram is not that North 
Korea would be willing to 
commit suicide by firing a 
missile at the United States, 
even if it did develop one of 
sufficient range. Rather, it is 
the possibility that the 
North Koreans will sell one 
of the bombs or some of 
their plutonium to a terror- 
ist group. The president has 
warned North Korea not to 
transfer any materials from 
its nuclear program. But the 
warnings we have sent to 
North Korea these past six 
years have gone unheeded 
and its acts unpunished. It 
is not clear that this latest 
one will have any greater 
effect. If a warning is to 
have a chance of influencing 
North Korea's behavior it 
has to be much more specif- 
ic. It would have to promise 
retaliation against North 
Korea if a terrorist detonat- 
ed a nuclear bomb in one of 
our cities. It must be backed 



by a meaningful forensics 
program that can identify 
the source of a nuclear 
bomb. 

This test will certainly 
send an undesirable mes- 
sage to Iran, and that dam- 
age has already been done. 
But it is important to try to 
keep this action from precip- 
itating a nuclear arms race 
in the Asia-Pacific region. 
Both Japan and South 
Korea have the capability to 
move quickly to full nuclear- 
weapon status but have not 
done so because they have 
had confidence in our 
nuclear umbrella. They may 
now reevaluate their deci- 
sion. We should consult 
closely with Japan and 
South Korea to reassure 
them that they are still 
under our umbrella and 
that we have the will and 
the capability to regard an 
attack on them as an attack 
on the United States This 
may be necessary to discour- 
age them from moving for- 
ward with nuclear deter- 
rence of their own. 

Our government's inat- 
tention has allowed North 
Korea to establish a new 
and dangerous threat to the 
Asia-Pacific region. It is 
probably too late to reverse 
that damage, but serious 
attention to this problem 
can still limit the extent of 
the damage. 

The writer was secre- 
tary of defense from 1994 to 
1997. 



SEIZE THE OPPORTUNITY 



nVOni T? TZ'Q \Tf\l T tJ^VD 
UllvUiiJcj BlO V Ulo-i Hi I JD^ 

SPORTS TOURNAMENT! 

Bring yourself and 4 of your friends 
to sign up for the Tourname^^^ 

$5 per person, $25 a team. 
Register Wednesday, Oct. 26 in QemmeU 



I 



I 



Game D&v 

Sunday November 12 

2 p.m. 

Rec Center 



I 
I 
i 
I 

I 

i I 



1st Place team 

recieves Eagle Dollars 
donated by Egbert Hai 

2xLd and 3rd teams 

will recieve other prizc 



Mtms 



Podcasts aren't just about portability 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond@clarion.edu 

With the emergence of 
several different brands, 
styles and features of MP3 
players, it's hard to keep up 
with the latest advance- 
ments. 

Podcasts are one of 
these developments that 
continue to grow in popular- 
ity. They are offered all over 
the internet, yet many peo- 
ple are confused by their 
specific qualities. 

Named the New Oxford 
American Dictionary's 

"Word of the Year" in 2005, 
podcasts began to gain pop- 
ularity in 2004 when Apple 
introduced them for use 
with iPods. 

According to the diction- 
ary, a podcast is "a digital 
recording of a radio broad- 
cast or similar program, 
made available on the 
Internet for downloading to 
a personal audio player." 

In reality, podcasts can 
be video, audio or graphics 
that are delivered over a 
Really Simple Syndication 
(RSS) feed. 

A large misconception is 
that podcasts are only used 
and available on iPods. 
Although the name "pod- 
cast" does come from a mix- 
ture of "iPod" and "broad- 
cast," podcasts are available 
from a variety of different 
sources, for any kind of 
portable music device. 

In fact, most podcasts do 
not even make it to MP3 
players. According to a sur- 



vey by Bridge Data, over 80 
percent of podcasts are sole- 
ly listened to on computers 
and are never transferred to 
be used portably 

(http7/news.digitaltrends.co 
m/talkbackl09.html). 

Another misconception 



site. 

Hundreds of other sites 
have begun to offer pod- 
casts. 

Yahoo.com has a specific 
area of its site called "Yahoo! 
Podcasts." 

Many shows are offered 





TTie WaiMngton Post 

Portable music devices- Contrary to popular belief, Podcasts 
aren't just for IPods, nor do they even have to be transferred 
to a portable device. 



is that podcasts cost hsten- 
era to use. Podcasts are 
actually free from iTunes 
and many other Web sites 
that offer them. 

ITunes is one of the 
largest sites for podcasts. 
Apple began to offer them to 
use with iPods. Now, radio 
shows, television programs, 
video and many more are 
streamed from the site. 

This Web site allows you 
to pick from dozens of cate- 
gories or even search them 
based on popularity with 
other listeners. One can also 
play a podcast from any- 
where on the Web from the 



as well as reports from ABC 
News and technology 
updates. They also offer a 
list of popular terms to 
search through, like comedy, 
religion and talk. 

Similarly, media outlets 
such as CNN and the New 
York Times offer podcasts 
online. Updates for world 
news, business and sum- 
maries of the day's events 
are available. 

Many television shows 
have also adopted podcasts 
to further their on-screen 
characters or allow viewers 
to get to know the actors. 

Soap opera 'Days of Our 



Lives" features podcasts of 
interviews with various 
casts members. They 
describe their character, 
how they feel about the sto- 
rylines and insights into 
their personal lives. 

Payton, a character on 
the CW's "One Tree Hill," 
has her own podcast that 
ties into what happens on 
the episodes. This is used as 
an additional way to portray 
the character since she often 
uses her webcam and has a 
podcast on the show. 

Many radio shows also 
offer their morning talk 
shows over podcast. Other 
sites offer advice, some pro- 
vide humor and others give 
information. 

Podcasts have become a 
highly used source of infor- 
mation over the Internet. 
ESPN, religious organiza- 
tions and even Colonial 
Williamsburg offer informa- 
tive sessions over podcasts. 

Company and large stu- 
dios are not the only ones 
who create podcasts for the 
masses. A large number of 
them come from people's 
homes. 

Sites like iPodder.org 
and Weblogs.com offer 
users' podcasts that range 
from opinions on politics to 
what they did in their day to 
cooking tips. 



ASKWcronmci/i'E 



Dear Dr. Eagle, 

I WHS sick this past week and 1 went to the Health 
Center tb see what was wrong. When I got there, the 
whole waiting room was full. I was unable to wait to see 
someonf feprat/.^se I had to go to claaa. Is the Health 
Ct >r ia there a time of day that would 

fee better t-o go? 
Signed, 
Curious 

t^r Cuzioua, 

The Health Center has 
been very busy these past few 
weeks. The time of day it is 
uaually the least croyrded ia 
between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m., 
but there are no guarantees. 
TTie Health Center has been 
taMng steps to try and fix 
thk problem. In March they 
hired Beverly O'Rourke and 
in late September they hired 
l^nn Mason, both Nurse 
Practitioners. Because of the 
increase in staff, the Health 
Center will be going back to 
appointments beginning 
Octxfber 30tb. Everyone will 
be encoumged to call for an appointment, but if there is 
an urgent matter walking will be accepted and priori- 
timed by a nurse. The nurae will determine if an ill stu- 
dent should be seen that day or should return for an 
appointment. 

The Health Center is aim exploring a software pack- 
age that would allow students to schedule appointments 
on-line. 



Dr. Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson of the Keeling 
Health Center. For more information or to suggest a 
topic, e-mail her at s_smwilson^larion.edu. 




Delta Zeta to present mock car accident 



Jamie Bero 
UAB 







Know anyone who is an 
outstanding student? 

Nominate tliem for tlie Campus Close-up! 

Send their name and why they deserve it to 

s_sadesmond@clarion.edu 



On Thursday, Oct. 19, 
Delta Zt.'ta is sponsoring a 
mock disaster (car accident) 
on campus. It will be on the 
Ralston Flats (field by 
Chandler Dining Hall). 
Staging will begin at 11 a.m. 
and the action will take 
place at 12 p.m. Jamie 
LeVier, Public Information 
Officer for the Pennsylvania 
State Police, will serve as 
the emcee for the event. It is 
being held in conjunction 
with National Collegiate 
Alcohol Awareness Week 



and Delta Zeta's "I Have a 
Choice" program. 

There will be represen- 
tatives from Clarion Fire 
and Hose Company #1 (cut- 
ting the "victims" out of the 
cars). Clarion County Office 
of Emergency Management, 
Clarion County Emergency 
Response Team, Clarion 
County Ambulance, the 
Pennsylvania State Police, 
Clarion University Public 
Safety, the United States 
Army and Delta Zeta 
Sorority. 

For additional informa- 
tion contact Jamie Bero at 
jbero@clarion.edu. 



Apple dominates portable player market, competitors can't compete 



Rob Pegoraro 

The Washington Post 

The iPod shouldn't dom- 
inate the , digital-media- 
player market. 

That's not a value judg- 
ment, just a statement 
about economics. 

For all the success of 
Apple's iTunes Store, most 
digital music still consists of 
MP3 files, which anybody 
can build a device to play. 
And anytime one company 
must compete with the col- 
lective talent of everybody 
else in the world, it should 
be lucky to grab one -third of 
the market. 

Instead, Apple owns 
more than 70 percent of it 
and has wiped the likes of 
Sony and Dell off the map. 

Last month, Apple 
renewed its drive for the 
rest of the market by revis- 
ing its lineup of iPods. Its 
new models don't mark a 
major shift, but still worked 
far better than two other 
players put through the 
same tests. 

As before, all of Apple's 
models-the $79 iPod 
Shuffle; the iPod Nano, from 
$149 to $249; the full-size 



iPod, $249 and $349-can 
play iTunes Store music 
purchases, AAC and MP3 
files, audio books and pod- 
casts. The Nano and full- 
size models also display 
photos, calendars, addresses 
and text notes. In addition, 
the full-size iPod plays TV 
downloads, movies and 
games. 

The iPod Shuffle, ship- 
ping later this month, is 
much smaller. But on the 
other iPods, the size and 
basic design have barely 
changed; a sharp, color dis- 
play below the clever 
ClickWheel control, which 
puts every possible function 
a flick of your thumb away. 

The new Nano, just 1.75 
ounces with its headphones, 
is encased in colorful 
anodized aluminum instead 
of scratch-prone plastic. The 
$149, two gigabyte model is 
silver; the $199, four GB 
version can be had in silver, 
blue, green or pink; and the 
$249, eight GB variant 
comes only in black. 

Inside that sturdy exte- 
rior, the battery life has 
been boosted to an adver- 
tised 24 hours-though the 
four-GB Nano I tried lasted 
almost 26 hours. Its battery. 



like those of all iPods, is 
sealed inside its case; Apple 
charges $59 to replace it. 
The Nano also now lets you 
search for a song by spelling 
letters out with the 
ClickWheel. 

The full-size, don't-call- 
it-video iPod looks no differ- 
ent from before but adds the 
Nano's search option and 
longer battery life. An 80 GB 
model lasted for 22 hours of 
music and seven hours of 
video. 

This updated model can 
also double a.s a handheld 
game player, at least for the 
small set of $4.99 titles sold 
on iTunes. 

The program included 
with these new models, 
however, needs work. 
ITunes 7 (Win 2000 and XP 
and Mac OS X 10.3 or 
newer) can transfer iTunes 
purchases from an iPod to 
another computer signed 
into your iTunes account, 
eases updating an iPod's 
software and finally brings 
"gapless playback" to iPods, 
removing pauses between 
classical, opera and other 
tracks meant to be heard 
uninterrupted. 

It fetches album-cover 
images automatically (with 



moderate success), then lets 
you view your collection by 
that art-just like Microsoft's 
upcoming Windows Media 
Player 11. 

But its slick new 
"CoverFlow" album-cover 
view bogs down older com- 
puters. Many users have 
reported more serious prob- 
lems, including crashes and 
difficulties playing iTunes 
purchases. 

That kind of unreliabili- 
ty is more commonly associ- 
ated with non-iPod players, 
as SanDisk's Sansa e280 
(eight GB, $250) and 
Toshiba's Gigabeat S60 (60 
GB, $399) illustrated over a 
week of tests. 

The Sansa-also avail- 
able in two GB, four GB and 
six GB sizes for $140, $180 
and $220-looks like an over- 
inflated Nano. The Gigabeat 
(a 30 GB model goes for 
$299) resembles the regular 
iPod and offers a compara- 
ble range of music, photo 
and video support. 

The SanDisk and 
Toshiba players don't 
approach the iPod's simplic- 
ity 

Consider the basic task 
of copying your music to the 
device. With an iPod, you 



plug it into the computer, 
the iPod starts up, iTunes 
sees it and offers to synchro- 
nize your song files. You 
plug one of these into the 
PC, press its power button, 
wait for Windows to pop up 
a dialog asking you to pick a 
music program, then hope 
Microsoft's XP-only 

Windows Media Player 10 
recognizes the new hard- 
ware-something it often 
failed to do with the Sansa. 

Neither of the two gadg- 
ets comes with podcast sup- 
port, and putting pictures or 
video on the Sansa requires 
a second program. 

The controls of each 
player were more cumber- 
some. The Sansa's array of 
buttons looks like a 
ClickWheel but is less ele- 
gant and feels flimsier. On 
the Gigabeat, adjusting vol- 
ume, pausing playback or 
skipping to the next or pre- 
vious song requires pressing 
tiny buttons on its side. 

Their screens almost 
wash out in direct sunlight, 
while the iPod's stays legi- 
ble. And after a few minutes 
of playback without user 
input, these displays shut 
off instead of just dimming, 
forcing you to adjust the vol- 



ume or tap another button 
to see what song just came 
up. 

The Sansa sustained 18 
hours of music playback, 
while the Gigabeat allowed 
10 hours of music, four of 
video. 

Replacing the Sansa's 
battery requires just $20 
and a steady hand with a 
jeweler's screwdriver. The 
Gigabeat battery isn't acces- 
sible; Toshiba charges $35 to 
replace it. 

For all of their issues, 
these gadgets offer a few 
useful extras. Both include 
FM (but not AM) tuners, 
and the Sansa can record 
FM and voice and accept 
additional memory via a 
microSD card slot. 

It's supposed to matter 
that these Windows Media- 
compatible devices can play 
songs rented from such sub- 
scription services as 
Napster, and that the 
Gigabeat also supports 
video-download stores such 
as Amazon's new Unbox. 

But how many shoppers 
will base their decisions on 
the lure of a store they've 
never tried? 



Page 4 



Ttfg CLARION CALL 



October 12, 2006 



October 12. 2006 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



Possible misinformed statements don't go unnoticed 



Ryan Souder 

s_rsouder®cl8rioii fMiu 



Ah the I'li'Lticin season 
lu'ats up nnd hoth the 
Di'tiKifratic and Ki'puhlican 
parties jockey Inr votes, we 
as students and citizens, 
must make absolute sure 
that intbnnation we receive 
is taken into context of who 
[irockices that nitnnnalinn 
and what the> hope lo 
aeliieve from it. In the 
September 28, 2(K)H issue of 
the Clarion Call ar(i(l(> was 



printed nil I he front page 
entitled "College 

Republicans Revamp Club " 
While I happv that more 
studeiUs afe getting 
inv(dved m the political 
process I must insist thai 
students strive for the fads. 
The Article has a few glar 
ing misinformed .state* 
nients and/or outright lies. 
The biggest lie that 
■^tuck out w,i< tlu' state 
inent that the College 
Uepublicans havi' the 
largest mendxashii) of any 
political gniu|) on (junpus. 
The Colleg(> Republicans 



«» NOT the largest pnliti 
cal group membership wise 
on campus. 'I'he Young 
Democrats has a member- 
ship (comprised of email 




lists and HSO li.st! of i-Mi, 

The C(dlege 

Republicans claim to have 
SO members (I'm not sure 
whei'c tliey got that esti- 
mate) .and while I am not a 
iiialh maior I do know 9f) to 



be largi'r than HO. While 1 
am biased member of the 
student body as thi' 
President of thi' Young 
Democrats. [ still hold tiiu' 
to certain values. This is 
why 1 . along with my fellow 
young democrats, are who 
we are. We don't appreciate 
disseminated information, 
outright lies, or other mech- 
anisms to distort This is 
the reason I ,im not allow- 
ing such an article to go 
unchallenged even if it does 
seem a bit petty .Ml I'm 
asking is that this election 
sea.son given the facts that 



voters (student voters espe- 
cially), trust their gut. find 
the truth, and vote for the 
right candidate on 
November 7. Fo r 

anyone interested in a polit- 
ical organization that will 
NOT lie to your face, the 
Young Democrats meet 
every 'I\iesday in Room 118 
Founders Hall at (ip.m. 

Ryan Souder 
President 
Clarion Young Democrats 

Editovi^ Note: Tho int'ovmir 
tion that npponivci in the 



Svptomher 28 issue of The 
Call wiis qiiotvd directly 
from H Press Kelease from 
the Chirion County 
RepuhUciin Committee, nnd 
rends "... the College 
Repuhliciin (^lub on the 
campus of CInrion 
University now boasts the 
largest membership of any 
political organization on the 
campus." If there are any 
further questions about this 
information, you may con- 
tact Greg Mortimer at 
(8 ID- 226- WOO Ext. 2500. 



In search of a North Korea policy 



William J. Perry 

Los Angeles Times ■ 
Washington Post News Service 

North Korea's dccl.ircil 
nuclear bomb test progiam 
will increase the incentives 
for other nations to go 
nuclear, will endang(>r seen 
rity in the region and could 
ultimately result in nuclear 
lerrorism. While this test is 
the culmination of North 
Korea's longheld aspiration 
to become a nuclear power. 
It also demonstrates the 
failure of the Bush adminis- 
tration's policy toward that 
country. For almost six 
years this policy has been a 
strange combination of 
harsh rhetoric and inaction. 

President Bush, early in 
his first term, dubbed North 
Korea a member of the "axis 
of evil" and made disparag- 
ing remarks about Kim Jong 
II. He said he would not tol- 
erate a North Korean 
nuclear weapons program. 
but he set no bounds on 
North Korean actions. 



im|)ortant 



^uch 



The mo- 
limit would have been on 
reprocessing spent fuel from 
N<irth Korea's reactor to 
in.'ike plutonium The 
Clinton administr.ation 

de.dared in IWl that iF 
North Korea reproces.sed, it 
would be crossing a "vvd 
Unv." and it threatened mil- 
itary action if that line was 
crossed. The Noith Koreans 
responded to that inessuri' 
and began negotiations that 
led to the ,\gree(l 
Framework. The ,\greed 
Framework did not end 
North Korea's aspirations 
for nuclear weapons, but it 
did result in a majoi' delay, 
For more than eight years, 
under the .Agreed 

Framework, the spent fuel 
was kept in a storage pond 
under international super- 
vision. 

Then in 2002. the Bush 
ad m i n ist ra tion d iscovered 
the existenci^ ofii covert pro- 
gram in uranium, evidently 
an attempt to evade the 
.\greed Framework. This 
progr.am, while potentially 



serious, would have led to a 
bomb at a very slow rate, 
{dinpare<l with the mor<> 
mature plutonium program. 
Nevertheless, the adminis 
t ration unwisely stopped 
compliance with the .\greed 
Framework In response the 
North Koreans sent the 
inspectors home and 
announced their intentif)n 
to reprocess. The adminis 
tration deplored the action 
but .set no "red line." North 
Korea made the plutonium. 

The administration also 
said early this summer that 
a North Korean test of long- 
range missiles was unac- 
ceptable. North Korea con- 
ducted a multiple-launch 
test of missiles on -July 1 
.Most recently, the adminis- 
tration said a North Korean 
test of a nuclear bomb would 
be unacceptable. A week 
later North Korea conducted 
its first test. 

It appears that the 
administration is deepiv 
divided on how to deal with 
North Koi-ea, with some 
favoring negotiation and 



Bring on 
the Winter 



with Millersville University's Winter Session 



V 

yvinter 

.s e s .s ion 



CUisses are in session from 
December 18 -January 14 

Registration begins October 25 



Enroll Today! 

» Most Millersville courses are transferable. 

» Take a course while at home for winter break 
- attend a class on-campus or online. 

» Earn credit in an accelerated format. 



Interested? 



Contact the Admissions office at (717) 872-3371 
or check out the Winter Session website at 
wwviMttlllersville.edu/~winter 



\lillersville University 



others economii' and politi- 
cal pressnre to \owe a 
regime change. .As a resnit, 
while the adtninistration 
was willing to send a repre- 
sentative to the six-party 
talks organized by the 
Chinese in 2(K)M, it had no 
apparent strategy for deal- 
ing with North Korea there 
or for providing leadership 
to the other parties. In the 
meantime, it increased eco- 
nomic pressure on 
Pyongyang. Certainly an 
argument can be made for 
such pressure, but it would 
be naive to think it could 
succeed without the support 
of the Chinese and South 
Korean governments, nei- 
ther of which backs such 
action. North Korea, sens- 
ing the administration's 
paralysis, has moved ahead 
with an aggressive and dan- 
gerous nuclear program. 

So what can be done 
now that might have a con- 
structive influence on North 
Koreas behavior? The 
attractive alternatives are 
behind us. There should and 
will be a U.N. resoli'iion 
condenuiing th( test. The 
United Nations tnay 
respond to calls from the 
United States and Japan for 
strong sanctions to isolate 
North Korea and cut off 
trade with it. But North 
Korea is already the most 
isolated nation in the world, 
and its government uses 
this isolation to its advan- 
tage. Stronger sanctions on 
materials that might be of 



use to the nuclear program 
are reasonable, but the 
horse is already out of the 
barn. Kconomic sanctions to 
squeeze North Korea would 
increase the suffering of its 
people but would have little 
effect on the elite. In any 
event, they would be effec- 
tive only if China and South 
Korea fully participated, 
and they have shown no 
inclination to do so. 

There will be calls to 
accelerate our national mis- 
sile defense program. But 
the greatest danger to the 
United States froin this pro- 
gram is not that North 
Korea would be willing to 
commit suicide by firing a 
missile at the United States, 
even if it did develop one of 
sufficient range. Rather, it is 
the possibility that the 
North Koreans will sell one 
of the bombs or some of 
their plutonium to a terror- 
ist group. The president has 
warned North Korea not to 
transfer any materials from 
its nuclear program. But the 
warnings we have sent to 
North Korea these past six 
ye^trs have gone unheeded 
and its acts unpunished. It 
is not clear that this latest 
one will have any greater 
effect. If a warning is to 
have a chance of influencing 
North Korea's behavior it 
has to be much more specif- 
ic. It would have to promise 
retaliation against North 
Korea if a terrorist detonat- 
ed a nuclear bomb in one of 
our cities. It must be backed 



by a meaningful forensics 
program that can identify 
the source of a nuclear 
bomb. 

This test will certainly 
send an undesirable mes- 
sage to Iran, and that dam- 
age has already been done. 
But it is important to try to 
keep this action from precip- 
itating a nuclear arms race 
in the Asia-Pacific region. 
Both Japan and South 
Korea have the capability to 
move quickly to full nuclear- 
weapon status but have not 
done so because they have 
had confidence in our 
nuclear umbrella. They may 
now reevaluate their deci- 
sion. We should consult 
closely with Japan and 
South Korea to reassure 
them that they are still 
under our umbrella and 
that we have the will and 
the capability to regard an 
attack on them as an attack 
on the United States This 
may be necessary to discour- 
age them from moving for- 
ward with nuclear deter- 
rence of their own. 

Our government's inat- 
tention has allowed North 
Korea to establish a new 
and dangerous threat to the 
Asia-Pacific region. It is 
probably too late to reverse 
that damage, but serious 
attention to this problem 
can still limit the extent of 
the damage. 

The writer was secre- 
tary of defense from 1994 to 
1997. 



CIRCLE KS VOLLEYBALL 
SPORTS TOURNAMENT! 

Bring yourself and 4 of your friends 
to sign up for the Tournament! 

$5 per person, $25 a team. 
Register Wednesday, Oct. 25 in Gemmell 



SEIZE THE OPPORTUNITY 



i Game Dav \ 

I Sunday November 12 I 
I 2 p.m. I 

I Rec Center I 

[ . ■ 



1st Place team 

recieves Eagle Dollars 
donated by Egbert Hall 

2nd and 3rd teams 

will recieve other prizes 



Ftitim 

Podcasts aren't just about portability 



Page 5 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond@clarion.edu 

With the emergence of 
several different brand.s. 
styles and feature.s of MV'.i 
players, it's hard to keep up 
with the latest advance- 
ments. 

Podcasts are one of 
these developments that 
continue to grow in popular- 
ity. They are offered all over 
the internet, yet many peo- 
ple are confused by their 
specific qualities. 

Named the New Oxford 
American Dictionary's 

"Word of the Year" in 2005. 
podcasts began to gain pop- 
ularity in 200 1 when Apple 
introduced them for use 
with iPods. 

According to the diction- 
ary, a podcast is "a digital 
recording of a radio broad- 
cast or similar program, 
made available on the 
Internet for downloading to 
a personal audio player" 

In reality, podcasts can 
be video, audio or graphics 
that are delivered over a 
Reallv Simple Syndication 
(RSS) feed. 

A large misconception is 
that podcasts are only used 
and available on iPods. 
Although the name "pod- 
cast" does come from a mix- 
ture of "iPod" and "broad- 
cast," podcasts are available 
from a variety of different 
sources, for any kind of 
portable music device. 

In fact, most podcasts do 
not even make it to MP3 
players. According to a sur- 



vey by Bridge Data, over HO site. 

percent of podcasts are sole- Hundreds of other sites 

ly listened to on computers have begun to offer pod- 

and are never transferred to casts. 

be used port ably Yahoo.com has a specific 

(http://news.digitaltrends.co area of its site called "Yahoo! 

m/talkback 109.html). Podcasts." 

Another misconception Many shows are offered 





The Washington Post 
Portable music devices Contrary to popular belief, Podcasts 
aren't just for IPods, nor do they even have to be transferred 
to a portable device. 



is that podcasts cost listen- 
ers to use. Podcasts are 
actually free from iTunes 
and many other Web sites 
that offer them. 

ITunes is one of the 
largest sites for podcasts. 
Apple began to offer them to 
use with iPods. Now, radio 
shows, television programs, 
video and many more are 
streamed from the site. 

This Web site allows you 
to pick from dozens of cate- 
gories or even search them 
based on popularity with 
other listeners. One can also 
play a podcast from any- 
where on the Web from the 



as well as reports from ABC 
News and technology 
updates. They also offer a 
list of popular terms to 
search through, like comedy, 
religion and talk. 

Similarly, media outlets 
such as CNN and the New 
York Times offer podcasts 
online. Updates for world 
news, business and sum- 
maries of the day's events 
are available. 

Many television shows 
have aLso adopted podcasts 
to further their on-screen 
characters or allow viewers 
to get to know the actors. 

Soap opera 'Days of Our 



Lives" features podcasts of 
interviews with various 
casts members. They 
describe their character, 
how they feel about the sto- 
rylines and insights into 
their personal lives. 

Payton, a character on 
the CW's "One Tree Hill," 
has her own podcast that 
ties into what happens on 
the episodes. This is used as 
an additional way to portray 
the character since she often 
uses her webcam and has a 
podcast on the show. 

Many radio shows also 
offer their morning talk 
shows over podcast. Other 
sites offer advice, some pro- 
vide humor and others give 
information. 

Podcasts have become a 
highly used source of infor- 
mation over the Internet. 
ESPN, religious organiza- 
tions and even Colonial 
Williamsburg offer informa- 
tive sessions over podcasts. 

Company and large stu- 
dios are not the only ones 
who create podcasts for the 
masses. A large number of 
them come from people's 
homes. 

Sites like iPodder.org 
and Weblogs.com offer 
users' podcasts that range 
from opinions on politics to 
what they did in their day to 
cooking tips. 



ASKWCWU'EmU'E 



Dear Dr. Eagle, 

I was sick this past week and I went to the Health 
Center to .see what was wiimg. When I got there, the 
whole waiting room was full. I was unable to wait to see 
someone because I had to go to class. Is the Health 
Center always busy or is there a time of day that would 
be better to go? 
Signed, 
Curious 

Dear Curious, 

The Health Center has 
been very busy these past few 
weeks. The time of day it is 
usually the lea.st crowded is 
between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m., 
but there are no guarantees. 
The Health Center has been 
taking steps to tty and fix 
this problem. In March they 
hired Beverly O'Rourke and 
in late September they hired 
Lynn Mason, both Nurse 
Practitioners. Because of the 
increase in staff, the Health 
Center will be going back to 
appointments beginning 
October 30th. Everyone will 
be encouraged to call for an appointment, but if there is 
an urgent matter walk-ins will be accepted and priori- 
tized by a nurse. The nurse will determine if an ill stu- 
dent should be seen that day or should return for an 
appointment. 

The Health Center is also exploring a software pack- 
age that would allow students to schedule appointments 
on-line. 



Dr. Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson of the Keeling 
Health Center, For more information or to suggest a 
topic, e-mail her at s_smwilson(§clai'ion.edu. 




Delta Zeta to present mock car accident 



Jamie Bero 
UAB 



'^ 















/ "v 




Know anyone who is an 
outstanding student? 

Nominate them for the Campus Close-up! 

Send their name and why they deserve It to 

s_sadesmond@clarion.edu 



On Thursday Oct. 19. 
Delta Zeta is sponsoring a 
mock disaster (car accident) 
on campus. It will be on the 
Ralston Flats (field by 
Chandler Dining Hall). 
Staging will begin at 11 a.m. 
and the action will take 
place at 12 p.m. Jamie 
LeVier, Public Information 
Officer for the Pennsylvania 
State Police, will serve as 
the emcee for the event. It is 
being held in conjunction 
with National Collegiate 
Alcohol Awareness Week 



and Delta Zeta's "1 Have a 
Choice" program. 

There will be represen- 
tatives from Clarion Fire 
and Hose Company #1 (cut- 
ting the "victims" out of the 
cars). Clarion County Office 
of p]mergency Management. 
Clarion County Emergency 
Response Team. Clarion 
County Ambulance, the 
Pennsylvania State Police. 
Clarion University Public 
Safety, the United State.^ 
Army and Delta Zeta 
Sorority. 

For additional informa- 
tion contact Jamie Bero at 
jbero@clarion.edu. 



Apple dominates portable player market, competitors can't compete 



Rob Pegoraro 

The Washington Post 

The iPod shouldn't dom- 
inate the digital-media- 
player market. 

That's not a value judg- 
ment, just a statement 
about economics. 

For all the success of 
Apple's iTunes Store, most 
digital music still consists of 
MP3 files, which anybody 
can build a device to play. 
And anytime one company 
must compete with the col- 
lective talent of everybody 
else in the world, it should 
be lucky to grab one-third of 
the market. 

Instead, Apple owns 
more than 70 percent of it 
and has wiped the likes of 
Sony and Dell off the map. 

Last month, Apple 
renewed its drive for the 
rest of the market by revis- 
ing its lineup of iPods. Its 
new models don't mark a 
major shift, but still worked 
far better than two other 
players put through the 
same tests. 

As before, all of Apple's 
models-the $79 iPod 
Shuffle; the iPod Nano, from 
$149 to $249; the full-size 



iPod. $249 and $349-can 
play iTunes Store music 
purchases, AAC and MP3 
files, audio books and pod- 
casts. The Nano and full- 
size models also display 
photos, calendars, addresses 
and text notes. In addition, 
the full-size iPod plays TV 
downloads, movies and 
games. 

The iPod Shuffle, ship- 
ping later this month, is 
much smaller. But on the 
other iPods, the size and 
basic design have barely 
changed: a sharp, color dis- 
play below the clever 
ClickWheel control, which 
puts every possible function 
a flick of your thumb away. 

The new Nano, just 1.75 
ounces with its headphones, 
is encased in colorful 
anodized aluminum in.stead 
of scratch-prone plastic. The 
$149, two gigabyte model is 
silver; the $199, four GB 
version can be had in silver, 
blue, green or pink; and the 
$249, eight GB variant 
comes only in black. 

Inside that sturdy exte- 
rior, the battery life has 
been boosted to an adver- 
tised 24 hours-though the 
four-GB Nano I tried lasted 
almost 26 hours. Its battery. 



like tho.se of all iPods, is 
sealed inside its case: Apple 
charges $59 to replace it. 
The Nano also now lets you 
search for a song by spelling 
letters out with the 
ClickWheel. 

The full-size, don't-calP 
it-video iPod looks no differ- 
ent from before but adds the 
Nano's search option and 
longer battery life. An 80 GB 
model lasted for 22 hours of 
music and seven hours of 
video. 

This updated model can 
also double a.s a handheld 
game player, at least for the 
small set of $4.99 titles sold 
on iTunes. 

The program included 
with these new models, 
however, needs work. 
ITunes 7 (Win 2000 and XP 
and Mac OS X 10.3 or 
newer) can transfer iTunes 
purchases from an iPod to 
another computer signed 
into your iTunes account, 
eases updating an iPod's 
software and finally brings 
"gapless playback" to iPods. 
removing pauses between 
classical, opera and other 
tracks meant to be heard 
uninterrupted. 

It fetches album-cover 
images automatically (with 



moderate success), then lets 
you view your collection by 
that art-just like Microsoft's 
upcoming Windows Media 
Player 11. 

But its slick new 
"CoverFlow" album-cover 
view bogs down older com- 
puters. Many users have 
reported more serious prob- 
lems, including crashes and 
difficulties playing iTunes 
purchases. 

That kind of unreliabili- 
ty is more commonly associ- 
ated with non-iPod players, 
as SanDisk's Sansa e280 
(eight GB, $250) and 
Toshiba's Gigabeat S60 (60 
GB, $399) illustrated over a 
week of tests. 

The Sansa-also avail- 
able in two GB. four GB and 
six GB sizes for $140, $180 
and $220-looks like an over- 
inflated Nano. The Gigabeat 
(a 30 GB model goes for 
$299) resembles the regular 
iPod and offers a compara- 
ble range of music, photo 
and video support. 

The SanDisk and 
Toshiba players don't 
approach the iPod's simplic- 
ity. 

Consider the basic task 
of copying your music to the 
device. With an iPod. vou 



plug it into the computer, 
the iPod starts up, iTunes 
sees it and offers to synchro- 
nize your song files. You 
plug one of these into the 
PC, press its power button, 
wait for Windows to pop up 
a dialog asking you to pick a 
music program, then hope 
Micro.soft's XP-only 

Windows Media Player 10 
recognizes the new hard- 
ware-something it often 
failed to do with the Sansa. 
Neither of the two gadg- 
ets comes with podcast sup- 
port, and putting pictures or 
video on the Sansa requires 
a second program. 

The controls of each 
player were more cumber- 
some. The Sansa's array of 
buttons looks like a 
ClickWheel but is less ele- 
gant and feels flimsier. On 
the Gigabeat. adjusting vol- 
ume, pausing playback or 
skipping to the next or pre- 
vious song requires pressing 
tiny buttons on its side. 

Their screens almost 
wash out in direct sunhght, 
while the iPod's stays legi- 
ble. -And after a few minutes 
of playback without user 
input, these displays shut 
off instead of just dimming, 
forcing you to adjust the vol- 



ume or tap another button 
to see what .song just came 
up. 

The Sansa sustained 18 
hours of music playback, 
while the Gigabeat allowed 
10 hours of music, four of 
video. 

Replacing the Sansa's 
battery requires just $20 
and a steady hand with a 
jeweler's screwdriver. The 
Gigabeat battery isn't acces- 
sible: Toshiba charges $35 to 
replace it. 

For all of their issues, 
these gadgets offer a few 
useful extras. Both include 
FM (but not AM) tuners, 
and the Sansa can record 
P'M and voice and accept 
additional memory via a 
microSD card slot. 

It's supposed to matter 
that these Windows Media- 
compatible devices can play 
songs rented from such sub- 
scription services as 
Napster, and that the 
Gigabeat also supports 
video-download stores such 
as .Amazon's new Unbox. 

But how many shoppers 
will base their decisions on 
the lure of a store they've 
never tried? 



PaaLi 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



October 12. 2006 



October 12. 2006 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



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IhfTERNATIONAL CORNER 

Featuring Clarion students who studit^d abroad and students in Clarion from other nations. 




100 Days, 24000 Miles, 12 Countries: My Semester at Sea Experience 



Jed Millard 

August 27, 2005 was a 
day of mixed emotions. I 
was sad saying goodbye to 
my family, knowing that in 
a few short days I would be 
thousands of miles away. I 
was anxiously awaiting for 
the plane that would take 
me from Syracuse, NY to 
Nassau, Bahamas where 1 
could begin my journey. 
But overall, I was excited 
to see the world. 

I departed Nassau on 
August 30, 2005 with 
approximately 700 other 
students embarking on a 
voyage that would eventu- 
ally change my life forever. 
The MV Explorer would be 
my new home for the next 
100 days, and the sea 
would be my backyard. Not 
only would the ship be my 
home, but also my trans- 



portation to 10 ports of call 
around the globe, and my 
campus. Each day that the 
ship was at sea, we would 
have class. Weekends did 
not exist, only A or B days. 
I was in class on 
Thanksgiving, but I was in 
the South China Sea. 

Throughout the course 
of the voyage, I experienced 
12 countries and 12 cul- 
tures. I visited: The 
Bahamas, Venezuela, 

BrazU, South Africa, 
Mauritius, India, 

Myanmar (Burma), 

Vietnam, Cambodia, Hong 
Kong, Peoples' Republic of 
China and Japan. It is 
impossible to say which 
country was my favorite, 
because I had such differ- 
ent experiences in each 
one. Because of this voy- 
age, I have rappelled down 



300 foot high waterfalls in 
Venezuela; met Archbishop 
Desmond Tutu, a Nobel 
Peace Prize winner; gone 
skydiving in South Africa; 
worked on AIDS projects 
with MTVu in India: partic- 
ipated in a Buddhist feed- 
ing ceremony at a 
monastery in Burma; seen 
the horror of genocide and 
the beauty of ancient tem- 
ples in Cambodia: seen the 
harsh reality of war in 
Vietnam; climbed the 
Great Wall in China; gotten 
tattooed in Japan: and 
made some of the closest 
friends I will ever have in 
my life. 

While 45 percent of ray 
time was spent in country, 
a majority was spent on the 
ship. A typical day on the 
ship would include getting 
up around 0800. eating 



breakfast, making it to 
Global Studies by 0920, 
class till 1230, lunch at 
1300, sunbathing on the 
top deck or napping until 
class at 1545, dinner at 
1700, then different activi- 
ties depending on the 
schedule for that night. We 
would have themed "Pub 
Nights," the only time alco- 
hol was permitted on the 
ship, in a controlled envi- 
ronment. Neptune Day was 
celebrated with a ceremony 
and no classes on the day 
we crossed the equator. The 
Sea Olympics took place in 
the Indian Ocean on the 
way to Mauritius from 
South Africa. Halloween 
had people dressed up in 
some of the random things 
they bought in-country (I 
was a Burmese street child 
selling postcards). The 



Ambassador's Ball was a 
huge gala event with a five 
course meal, everyone in 
formal attire, and a dance 
following dinner. And, 
Thanksgiving dinner was 
spent with our onboard 
Tamihes." We enjoyed the 
Crew Talent Show, the 
Students of Service Charity 
Auction, a salsa show, 
improv comedy group, 
atand up comedy, karaoke 
nights, dances, lectures 
and community college pre- 
sentations. 

Semester at Sea gave 
me a brand new outlook on 
life. I am more aware of 
what is going on through- 
out the world and have a 
new appreciation for my 
own life. On the first day of 
class, I was sitting in my 
international business 
class and the professor 



started off the lecture by 
saying, in his thick Tbxas 
accent, "Tall know ya live 
in paradise right?" 

I was thinking to 
myself, "Maybe the kids in 
the room from Santa 
Barbara and Miami live in 
paradise, but not me!" 

Professor Gillis contin- 
ued, "Ya might not believe 
me now, but just you wait 
til we get to Venezuela. 
Then you'll know," 

Three days later, I 
woke up and looked out my 
window, and saw the coast 
of Venezuela before me. I 
saw hundreds of homes lit- 
erally stacked on top of 
each other up the side of a 
coastal mountain. At that 
moment, I realized how 
privileged I really am. 



AJl students are invited to the next Study Abroad session in 104 Founders, n&xt Thursday Oct. 19 at 5 p.m. 

Come and learn about the opportunities and funding available. 
For questions on Study Abroad, contact. Dr. Sandra Tregos at strerjo8@clarion.edu 



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Page 7 



Survival tips for Friday tfie IStfi: ward off evil spirits 



Andrea Sachs 

The Washington Post 

Friday is the 13th, and 
if you're not careful, an evil 
spirit could enter your body 
and steal your soul-or, at 
the very least, cause you to 
drop a meatball on your 
crisp white shirt. To ward 



SHA 

Student Honors 

Association 




October 1 8 
11 a.m.- 6 a.m. 

Gemmell Student 
Complex 



Tickets are only $.50 
or 3 for a dollar! 

Proceeds will be 

used towards the 

SHA trip to Boston. 



off bad luck, protect yourself 
with any of these five rituals 
or tokens employed by cul- 
tures around the world. 
■ MusHms call it the Hand 
of Fatima, while Jews refer 
to it as the Hand of Miriam, 
hamsa hand or hamesh 
hand. Both faiths, however, 
agree on its powers. The 
hand with the colored 



eye-found on necklaces, 
ornaments, stickers, 

etc.-will shield you from the 
powers of the evil eye. 

■ Layer on the eyeliner and 
smoky eye shadow. Ancient 
Egyptians believed that 
makeup prevented the evil 
one from entering your eyes. 

■ Show the "horned hand." 
It looks like a secret greet- 

mmmmmmm 



ing among Metallica-heads, 
but Italians do the mano 
cornuta for protection. To 
form the gesture, use your 
thumb to hold down your 
middle and ring fingers, 
then extend your pointer 
and pinkie like horns. 
Though this might ward off 
evil spirits, it could also 
attract hcnvv-motal rockers 



or University of Texas fans. 
■ In Jewish tradition, you 
have a few options^ Spit 
three times on your finger- 
tips, then wave them in the 
air; throw salt; say in 
Yiddish, kayn aynhoreh ("no 
evil eye"); or eat lots of gar- 
lic. For Transylvanians, the 
garlic (worn, not ingested) 
also frightens off vampires 



and werewolves. 
■ Grab a carrot, a replica of 
the Washington Monument 
or any other phallic object. 
According to Romans, such 
objects seduce the evil spirit 
away from you-however, 
your carrot might then be 
possessed. 







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A.L.F. Parade takes over Clarion streets 



Robyn Gray 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rigray®clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 7 - The 
Annual Autumn Leaf 
Festival parade kicked off 
Saturday, October 7 shortly 
after 12 p.m. 

Crowds of around 
20,000 people were said to 
travel to Clarion for all of 
the festivities, particularly 
the parade. 

The crowds lined up and 
down Main St. and Wood St. 
with people packed like sar- 
dines to catch a glimpse of 
all of the floats, bands, 
dance acts and even 
Pennsylvania governor can- 
didates Lynn Swann and Ed 
Rendell. Some even had 
chairs lined up late Friday 
evening along Main St. to 
assure a good seat for the 
show. 

A feeling of happiness 
was felt throughout the 
small town of Clarion on 



every street. There's just 
something about a parade 
that brings out the kid in 
adults and even the elderly. 

Small children enjoyed 
getting candy tossed to 
them, and even some college 
kids could be seen diving out 
for a Tootsie Roll or a pack- 
age of Sweet Tarts. 

The parade was an all 
around great way to get 
everyone together - stu- 
dents and their families, 
alumni, faculty and 
Clarion's own residents. 
Plus, who could pass up a 
Poorman's Caramel Apple or 
Quaker Steak wings during 
the parade? 

Applause and shouts of 
joy and praise were heard 
when the Clarion Dance 
Team performed two songs 
and never stepped out of 
Une. 

Local high school bands 
showed off their talent and 
even got some kids, young 
and old, dancing and tap- 
ping their toes to the beat. 



In between these acts 
were members of the 2006 



Homecoming Court riding 
in the beds of brand- new 




Shasta Kurtz/T/ie Clarion Call 
Hello, Clarion- Pa. governor candidate Lynn Swann 



trucks from the local dealer- 
ships. 

There were also classic 
cars and convertibles galore, 
which received the "ooohs" 
and "ahhs" from the crowd. 

In addition, certain 
.sororities and fraternities 
slaved for weeks construct- 
ing floats to show off their 
talent and what they stand- 
for. 

Brianne Fogarty, a 
sophomore speech pathology 
major and part of the fall 
2006 new member program 
for Zeta Tau Alpha, walked 
in the parade throwing out 
candy to the crowd along- 
side Zeta Tau Alpha and 
Sigma Sigma Sigma's com- 
bined float, focused on can- 
cer awareness. 

"The float was a lot of 
work to make, but it was all 
for a good cause and walk- 
ing in the parade was really 
fun," said Fogarty. 

The parade lasted 
around 2 hours and 15 min- 
utes, which showed that 



there was a lot of interest in 
it this year Fire companies 
from more than a half hour 
away oven shined up their 
trucks and traveled to 
Clarion for the event. 
KDKA-TV was there, 
reporting on the amazing 
number of people attracted 
for this event. Along with 
KDKA. Clarion's own televi- 
sion station, WCUB-TV, 
reported on it, along with 
the radio station. WCUC- 
FM. 

Tiffany Williams, a jun- 
ior communication major, 
reported atop a scaffold dur- 
ing the whole parade and 
stated, "This was probably 
one of the best A.L.F. 
parades since I've been at 
Clarion and 1 can tell people 
really enjoyed it." 

So everyone, let your 
countdown for A.L.F 2007 
begin, and until then, the 
Httle town of Clarion can 
settle down and return to its 
laid-back roots. 



Homecoming King and Queen named 



Emily Aaron 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_emaaron@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 5 - Seniors 
Sheena Zawacki and Justin 
Dandoy were named 
Homecoming King and 
Queen after numerous 
groups performed at this 
year's Pep Rally. 

Zawacki is a senior com- 
munication major and a 
member of the Phi Sigma 
Sigma sorority and Dandoy 
is a senior Political 
Science/English major and a 
member of the Phi Delta 
Theta fraternity. 

The cheerleaders were 
first to perform. They came 
on court by doing some tum- 
bling stunts and did a CUP 
cheer. 

The Golden Eagle 
Marching Band then began 
to play. After that, the 



dance team came out and 
performed to the songs 
"S.O.S," "Please Don't Say 
You're Sorry" and "The 
Whistle Song." 

The cheerleaders did 
another cheer and then the 
dance team performed once 
more before they began 
announcing the different 
sports teams and band. 

First to be announced 
was the marching band 
along with the color guards 
and the majorettes. 

Once they were all done 
being introduced, the band 
played another song for 
everyone. Next they intro- 
duced the Cross Country 
and Track teams. Women's 
Soccer, Wrestlers and finally 
the football team. 

As soon as the football 
team took their seats, one 
band member came out and 
did a hula hoop routine for 
the crowd and got everyone 



to do the wave. This got 
everyone hyped up and 
ready for the announcement 
of Homecoming King and 
Queen. 

First, they announced 
last years King and Queen, 
Dave Dang and Jessica 
Taylor. Then, they 
announced the court. 

The court included 
Jenna Angelos, Sheena 
Zawacki, Alison Davis, 
Laura Ferruchie, Kristy 
Marchal, Jenna Fike, 
Samantha Noblit, Melissa 
Gearing, Emma Kelly, 
Aaron Fitzpatrick, Justin 
Dandoy, Mike Jones, Chuck 
McKay, Mike Skaneski, 
Danny Diveley, Andrew 
Zachar, Glen Watson and 
Adam Young. 

After the pep rally 
Zawacki said, 'This is such 
a blessing to be this year's 
homecoming queen. My 
whole family came up from 



Florida for me and I'm so 
blessed that they could be 
here. Thank you to every- 
one who voted. I'm so proud 



to be here. I am absolutely 
ecstatic." 

Dandoy said after win- 
ning king, "I'm happy for 



the first time since my soph- 
omore year I am finally the 
Homecoming King. God 
BlessA.L.F'." 





King and Queen 

Queen. 



Courtesy of Newswire 

Seniors Sheena Zawacki and Justin Dandoy won Hormecoming King and 



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Art show on exhibit 



"Articulating Spaces: Poets and Artist Interacting 
with their Environment," which will feature work of both 
artist and poets, will begin next week in the Carlson 
Library University Gallery on Level A. 

The art show is scheduled to appear Oct. 16-18. It fea 
tures the artwork of Tom Rudd and Margo McCafferty, 
Robert Raczka, Fereshteh Hamidi-Toosi and Carolyn 
Lambert, Katherine McGinn, and Robert Bingham and 
Kathryn Sitter. 

The poetry portion of the show will be being Oct. 19 at 
5 p.m. featuring poet JuUa Kasdorf and will continue 
through Nov 16, when poets Patricia Jabbeh Wesley and 
Judith Volhner will read their work. 

- Sarah Dent 

UAB Movie of the Week 

UAB will be featuring "Pirat.es of the Caribbean: Dead 
Man's Chest" this week. The shows will be Thursday at 8 
p.m. in the Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room, Friday at 8 
p.m. in the MPR and Saturday at 8 p.m. iti the Gemmell 
Food Court. 

- Sarah Dent 

Miller vs. Pittsburgh 

On Oct. 7, actress Sienna Miller was carded at Foiino's 
Young's Tavern on Carson Street. Miller was refused 
entrance due to lack of identification, which resulted in 
Miller throwing a public hissy fit. 

Miller then proceeded to sneak in the side door to have 
drinks with her parents and was carded by the bar's 
owner. After both Miller and her parents making a huge 
deal about who she was, she finally left the bar, but hung 
around outside. 

Miller spoke up about her feelings on Pittsburgh in an 
article. She dropped the "P" and added an "Sh " at the 
beginning 

- Sarah Dent 



'Threepenny Opera" starts 06-07 season 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_sedent@clarion.edu 




"The Threepenny Opera" 
Director: Robert Gerald 
Levy 
Rating: 4/5 

The University Theatre 
Department opened its 
2006-07 season with 'The 
Threepenny Opera" directed 
by Robert Gerald Levy on 
Tuesday, Oct. 10 in the 
Marwick-Boyd Little 

Theatre. 

"The Threepenny 

Opera" was written by 
Bertolt Brecht, who wants 
his audience to feel as if 
they were watching a play. 
In order to do this, he alters 
the relationship between 
the audience and the play. 
He does this so that they 
view the play critically. I felt 
that this was definitely 
achieved, especially when 
the backdrop opened up at 



the end revealing Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium. Brecht 
wants items used to be 
clearly visiv 

When I first walked into 
the Little Theatre, I was 
really impressed. The 
unique shape of the stage, a 
pentagonish shape with two 
strangely shaped platforms 
on the front left corner, 
stuck out to me immediate- 
ly. Next, I noticed the five 
tables placed directly in 
front of the stage. The tables 
and'chairs were black with a 
blood red table cloth placed 
on top of them. 

The orchestra is located 
on the stage in the back 
right corner, which is anoth- 
er thing that Brecht insisted 
upon in his plays. The 
instruments featured were 
keyboard, banjo, reeds, 
trumpets, trombone and 
percussion. I personally had 
never seen an orchestra on 
stage during a play and I 
was worried that the sound 
would take away from the 
actors and actresses voices! 
I was wrong. 

The music, which was 
composed by Kurt Weill and 
directed by Brent Register, 
was amazing. It was soft 
and not overpowering, but 
loud enough that the audi- 
ence could hear it. 

The backdrop was defi- 
nitely one of the most inter- 
esting parts. When I walked 
in, it was a yellow and 
redish sort of pattern with 



the words "Die 

Dreigroschenoper" printed 
upon it. As the play pro- 
gressed, I noticed that song 
names, scene titles and loca- 
tions would appear on it. 

The play takes place in 
London, before and during 
Queen Victoria's coronation 
in 1837. 1 found that the cos- 
tumes were very appropri- 
ate for the time setting and 
location. The drab colors 
demonstrated that these 
people were indeed not 
wealthy. The girls' dresses 
were very intricately 
designed and fit their bodies 
perfectly, of course, they 
were a little tight in the 
bosom, but that's what 
makes them look like 
whores. 

The play starred Travis 
Dane Uhl as Mr. Jonathon 
Jeremiah Peachum, 

Gabrielle Greco as Mrs. 
Celia Peachum, Maggie 
Mayer as Polly Peachum, 
Kara Karstedt as Jenny 
Divers, Holly Mitchell as 
Lucy Brown, Joey Pettine as 
Tiger Brown and most 
importantly, Lashard 

Griffith as Capt. Macheath 
aka Mack the Knife. 

1 would like to say first 
and foremost that Griffith 
and Greco played their roles 
perfectly. Mrs. Peachum 
(Greco) was the alcoholic 
mother of Polly Peachum 
who marries Macheath. 
Greco's aggressive attitude 
fit her character very well. 




Her voice filled the entire 
theatre because it was so 
strong and powerful. There 
were certain parts of the 
play where I was actually 
intimidated by her because 
of how evil she looked. She 
excelled in her solo song 
"Ballad of Sexual 

Dependency," where she 
addresses the fact that 
Macheath will definitely 
cheat on her daughter 
because he cannot control 
his urges. 

Griffith was perfectly 
cast as Macheath. His deep 
voice and masculine appear- 
ance flatters Macheath, who 
is a notorious con artist. I 
think Griffith's greatest 
moment was when he was 
singing "The Army Song" 
with Tiger Brown (Pettine). 
These two manly men 
paraded around stage doing 
show-girl style dances, 
which 

See "OPERA" on page 
8. 



Pages 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



October 12. 2006 



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INTERNATIONAL CORNER 

Featuring Clarion students who studied nhvond and students in Chuion from other nations. 



October 12. 2006 



THE CLARION CALL 



Page 7 




100 Days, 24000 Miles, 12 Countries: IVIy Semester at Sea Experience 



Jed Millard 

August 27, 2005 was a 
day of mixed emotions. I 
was sad saying goodbye to 
my family, knowing that in 
a few short days I would be 
thousands of miles away. I 
was anxiously awaiting for 
the plane that would take 
me from Syracuse, NY to 
Nassau, Bahamas where I 
could begin my journey. 
But overall, I was excited 
to see the world. 

I departed Nassau on 
August 30, 2005 with 
approximately 700 other 
students embarking on a 
voyage that would eventu- 
ally change my life forever. 
The MV Explorer would be 
my new home for the next 
100 days, and the sea 
would be my backyard. Not 
only would the ship be my 
home, but also my trans- 



portation to 10 ports of call 
around the globe, and my 
campus. Each day that the 
ship was at sea, we would 
have class. Weekends did 
not exist, only A or B days. 
I was in class on 
Thanksgiving, but I was in 
the South China Sea. 

Throughout the course 
of the voyage, I experienced 
12 countries and 12 cul- 
tures. I visited: The 
Bahamas. Venezuela, 

Bi-azil, South Africa. 
Mauritius, India, 

Myanmar (Burma). 

Vietnam, Cambodia. Hong 
Kong, Peoples' Republic of 
China and Japan. It i.s 
impossible to say which 
country was my favorite, 
because I had such differ- 
ent experiences in each 
one. Because of this voy- 
age, I have rappelled down 



300 foot high waterfalls in 
Venezuela^ met Archbishop 
Desmond Tutu, a Nobel 
Peine I'rize winner; gone 
skydiving in South Africa; 
worked on AIDS projects 
with MTVu in India: partic- 
ipated in a Buddhist feed- 
ing ceremony at a 
monastery in Burma: seen 
the hoi-ror of genocide and 
the beauty of ancient tem- 
ples in Cambodi^i: seen the 
harsh reality of war in 
Vietnam: climbed the 
Great Wall in China: gotten 
tattooed in Japan: and 
made some of the closest 
friends I will ever have in 
my Jiltv 

While 15 percent of my 
time was spent in country, 
a majority was spent on the 
ship. A typical day on the 
ship would include getting 
up around 0800. eating 



breakfast, making it to 
Global Studies by 0920, 
class till 12;30, lunch at 
1300, sunbathing on the 
top deck or napping until 
class at 1545, dinner at 
1700, then different activi- 
ties depending on the 
.schedule for that night. We 
would have themed "Pub 
Nights," the only time alco- 
hol was permitted on the 
.ship, in a controlled envi- 
ronment. Neptune Day was 
celebrated with a ceremony 
and no classes on the day 
we crossed the equator. The 
Sea Olympics took place in 
the Indian Ocean on the 
way to Mauritius from 
South Africa. Halloween 
had people dressed up in 
some of the random things 
they bought in-country (I 
was a Burmese street child 
selling postcards). The 



Ambassador's Ball was a 
huge gala event with a five 
course meal, everyone in 
formal attire, and a dance 
following dinner, .'\nd. 
Thanksgiving dinner was 
.spent with our onboard 
"families." We enjoyed the 
Crew Talent Show, the 
Students of Service Charity 
Auction, a salsa show, 
improv comedy group, 
stand up comedy, karaoke 
nights, dances, lectures 
and community college pre- 
sentations. 

Semester at Sea gave 
me a brand new outlook on 
life. I am more aware of 
what is going on through- 
out the world and have a 
new appreciation for my 
own life. On the first day of 
class, I was sitting in my 
international business 
class and the professor 



started off the lecture by 
saying, in his thick Texas 
accent, "Y'all know ya live 
in paradise right?" 

1 was thinking to 
myself. "Maybe the kids in 
the room from Santa 
Barbara and Miami live in 
paradise, but not me!" 

Professor Gillis contin- 
ued, "Ya might not beheve 
me now, but just you wait 
'til we get to Venezuela. 
Then you'll know." 

Three days later, I 
woke up and looked out my 
window, and saw the coast 
of Venezuela before me. I 
saw hundreds of homes lit- 
erally stacked on top of 
each other up the side of a 
coastal mountain. At that 
moment, I realized how 
privileged I really am. 



All students are invited to the next Study Abroad session in 104 Founders, next Thursday Oct. 19 at 5 p.m. 

Come and learn about the opportunities and funding available. 
For questions on Study Abroad, contact. Dr. Sandra Trejos at strejos@clarion.edu 



Survival tips for Friday the 13th: ward off evil spirits 



Andrea Sachs 

The Washington Post 

Friday is the 13th, and 
if you're not careful, an evil 
spirit could enter your body 
and steal your soul-or. at 
the very least, cause you to 
drop a meatball on your 
crisp white shirt. To ward 



off bad luck, protect yourself 
with any ofthe.se five rituals 
or tokens employed by cul- 
tures around the world. 
■ Muslims call it the Hand 
of Fatima. whik' Jew -^ vvfvv 
to it as the Hand of Miriam, 
hamsa hand or hamesh 
hand. Both faiths, however, 
agree on its powers. The 
hand with the coIoih'cI 



e\c found on necklaces, 
ornaments, stickers, 

etc. -will shield you from the 
powers of the evil eye. 

■ Layer on the eyeliner and 
siiKiky i'>'e shndow. Ancient 
Kgyptians believed that 
makeup prevented the evil 
f)ne from entering your eyes. 

■ Show the 'honied liMiui.' 
It looks like a .-^ecret greet- 



ing among Metallica-heads, 
but Italians do the mano 
cornuta for protection. To 
form the gesture, use your 
thumb to hold down your 
middle and ring fingers, 
then extend your pointer 
and pinkie like horns. 
Though this might ward off 
c\il .-^jjirits. it could also 
attract heavymetal rockers 



SHA 

Student Honors 

Association 




October 1 8 
11 a.m.- 6 a.m. 

Gemmell Student 
Complex 



Tickets are only $.50 
or 3 for a dollar! 

Proceeds will be 

used towards the 

SHA trip to Boston. 



oi- University of Texas fans. 
■ In Jewish tradition, you 
have a few options^ Spit 
three times on your finger- 
tips, then wave them in the 
air; throw salt; say in 
Yiddish, kayn aynhoreh ("no 
evil eye"); or eat lots of gar- 
lic. For Ti'ansylvanians, the 
garlic (worn, not ingested) 
also frightens off vampires 



and werewolves. 
■ Grab a carrot, a replica of 
the Washington Monument 
or any other phallic object. 
According to Romans, such 
objects seduce the evil spirit 
away from you-however, 
your carrot might then be 
possessed. 



AS A COLLECiE ©ilAD, 




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DEALERS AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES SEE DEALER OR VISIT WWW TOYOTAFINANCIAL COM /FINANCE FOR DETAILS COLLEGE GRADUATE ROGRAMS SUB EQ^^^ S TERM S S xm 

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EttdHiineit 

A.L.F. Parade takes over Clarion streets 



Robyn Gray 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

S_rlgray@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct, 7 The 
Annual. Autumn Leaf 
Festival parade kicked off 
Saturday, Octobei- 7 shortly 
after 12 p.m. 

Crowds of around 
2(),()t)() people were said to 
travel to Clarion for all of 
the festivities, particularly 
the parade. 

The crowds lined up and 
down Main St. and Wood St. 
with people packed like sar- 
dines to catch a glimpsi^ of 
all of the floats, bands, 
dance acts and even 
Pennsylvania governor can- 
didates Lynn Swann and Kd 
Rendell. Some even had 
chairs lined up late Friday 
evening along Main St. to 
assure a good seat for the 
show. 

A feeling of happiness 
was felt throughout the 
small town of Clarion on 



every street. There's just 
something about a parade 
that brings out the kid in 
adults and even the elderly. 

Small children enjoyed 
getting candy tossed to 
them, and even .some college 
kids could be seen diving out 
for a Tootsie Roll or a pack 
age of Sweet Tarts. 

The parade was an all 
around great way to get 
everyone together - stu- 
dents and their families, 
alumni, faculty and 
Clarion's own residents. 
Plus, who could pass up a 
Poorman's Caramel Apple or 
Quaker Steak wings during 
the parade? 

Applause and shouts of 
joy and praise were heard 
when the Clarion Dance 
Team performed two songs 
and never stepped out of 
line. 

Local high school bands 
showed off their talent and 
even got some kids, young 
and old, dancing and tap- 
ping their toes to the beat. 



In between these aets 
were menibt'rs of the 200(1 



Homecominii Court riding 
111 till' beds of brand-new 




Shasta Kurtz/The Clarion Call 

Hello, Clarion- Pa. governor candidate Lynn Swann 



truik> lidin the loial dealer- 
slii|).s. * 

There were also classic 
cars and convertibles galore, 
which received the "ooohs" 
and "ahhs" from the crowd. 

In addition, certain 
sororitii's and frati'riiitics 
slaved for weeks construct- 
ing floats to show off thi'ir 
talent and what they stand- 
to r 

Hrianne Foj<arly, a 
sophomore speech pathology 
major and part oL tin- tall 
2()(JH new member program 
for Zeta Tau .\lphn. walked 
in the parade throwing out 
candy to the crowd along- 
side Zeta Tau .Alpha and 
Sigma Sigma Siginas com- 
bined float, focused on can- 
cer awareness. 

"The float was a lot of 
w(»rk to make, hut it was all 
for a ^f()()d cause and walk- 
ing ill the parade was really 
fun," said Fogarty. 

The parade lasted 
around 2 hours and 15 min- 
utes, which showed that 



there wa.> a lot ot interest in 
it this year. Fire companies 
from more than a half hour 
away even shined up their 
trucks and traveled to 
Clarion for the event. 
KnK.\-T\ was there. 
re|)ortitig on the ama/ing 
number of people attracted 
for this event, .\long with 
KI)K.\. Clarion > own televi- 
sion station. VVCUB-T\'. 
reported on it, along with 
the radio station, WCIK' 
l'.\l. 

Tiffany Williams, a jun- 
i(»r communication major, 
repoi'ted ato)) a .-scaffold dur- 
iul; the whole parade and 
■stated. Thi- A a- prohabl\ 
one of the l)est .\.L.F 
parades since I've been at 
Clarion and I can tell peojile 
reall\ enjoyed it .'" 

So everyone, let your 
countdown for ,\.L.F. 2007 
begin, and until then, the 
little tiiu ii (if Clarion can 
.-ettle down and return to its 
laid-back roots. 



Home coming King and Queen named 



Emily Aaron 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_emaaron@clarion edu 

CLARION, Oct. 5 - Seniors 
Sheena Zawacki and Justin 
Dandoy were named 
Homecoming King and 
Queen after numerous 
groups performed at this 
year's Pep Rally. 

Zawacki is a senior com- 
munication major and a 
member of the Phi Sigma 
Sigma sorority and Dandoy 
is a senior Political 
Science/English major and a 
member of the Phi Delta 
Theta fraternity. 

The cheerleaders were 
first to perform. They came 
on court by doing some tum- 
bling stunts and did a CUP 
cheer. 

The Golden Eagle 
Marching Band then began 
to play. After that, the 



dance team came out and 
performed to the songs 
-S.O.S," "Please Don't Say 
You're Sorry" and "The 
Whistle Song." 

The cheerleaders did 
another cheer and then the 
dance team performed once 
more before they began 
announcing the different 
sports teams and band. 

First to be announced 
was the marching band 
along with the color guards 
and the majorettes. 

Once they were all done 
being introduced, the band 
played another song for 
everyone. Next they intro- 
duced the Cross Country 
and IVack teams. Women's 
Soccer. Wrestlers and finally 
the football team. 

.As soon as the football 
team took their seats, one 
band member came out and 
did a hula hoop routine for 
the crowd and got everyone 




to do the wave. This got 
everyone hyped up and 
ready for the announcement 
of Homecoming King and 
Queen. 

First, they announced 
last years King and Queen, 
Dave Dang and Jessica 
Taylor. Then. they 

announced the court. 

The court included 
Jenna Angelos, Sheena 
Zawacki, .Alison Davis, 
Laura Ferruchie, Kristy 
.Marchal, Jenna Fike. 
Samantha Noblit, Melissa 
Gearing. Kmma Kelly, 
.Aaron Fitzpatrick, Justin 
Dandoy. Mike Jones, Chuck 
McKay, Mike Skaneski. 
Danny Diveley, Andrew 
Zachar. Glen Watson and 
Adam Young. 

After the pep rally 
Zawacki said, "This is such 
a blessing to be this year's 
homecoming queen. My 
whole family came up from 



Florida for me and I'm so to be here. 1 am absolutely 
blessed that they could be ecstatic." 
here. Thank you to every- Dandoy said after win- 
one who voted. I'm so proud ning king, "I'm happy for 



the first time since my soph- 
omore year 1 am finally the 
Homecoming King. God 
HIessA.L.F." 




King and Queen 

Queen. 



Courtesy of Newswire 

Seniors Sheena Zawacl<i and Justin Dandoy won l-iomec6ming King and 



Art sliow on exiiibit 



"Articulating Spaces: Poets and Artist Interacting 
with their Environment," which will feature work of both 
artist and poets, will begin next week in the Carlson 
Library University Gallery on Level A. 

The art show is scheduled to appear Oct. 16-18. It fea- 
tures the artwork of Tom Rudd and Margo McCafferty, 
Robert Raczka, Fereshteh Hamidi-Toosi and Carolyn 
Lambert, Katherine McGinn, and Robert Bingham and 
Kathryn Sitter. 

The poetry portion of the show will be being Oct. 19 at 
5 p.m. featuring poet Julia Kasdorf and will continue 
through Nov. 16, when poets Patricia Jabbeh Wesley and 
Judith VolLmer will read their work. 

- Sarah Dent 

UAB Movie of tlie Weeic 

UAB will be featuring "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead 
Man's Chest" this week. The shows will be Thursday at 8 
p.m. in the Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room, Friday at 8 
p.m. in the MPR and Saturday at 8 p.m. in the Gemmell 
Food Court. 

- Sarah Dent 

Milier vs. Pittsburgii 

On Oct. 7, actress Sienna Miller was carded at Feline's 
Young's Tavern on Carson Street. Miller was refused 
entrance due to lack of identification, which resulted in 
Miller throwing a public his.sy fit. 

Miller then proceeded to sneak in the side door to have 
drinks with her parents and was carded by the bar's 
owner. After both Miller and her parents making a huge 
deal about who she was, she finally left the bar, but hung 
around outside. 

Miller spoke up about her feelings on Pittsburgh in an 
article. She dropped the "P" and added an "Sh" at the 
beginning 

- Sarah Dent 



''Threepenny Opera" starts 06-07 season 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_sedent@clarion.edu 




"The Threepenny Opera' 
Director: Robert Gerald 
Levy 
Rating: 4/5 



The University Theatre 
Department opened it.s 
2006-07 season with "The 
Threepenny Opera" directed 
by Robert Gerald Levy on 
Tuesday, Oct. 10 in the 
Marwick-Boyd Little 

Theatre. 

"The Threepenny- 

Opera" was written by 
Bertolt Brecht. who wants 
his audience to feel as if 
they were watching a play. 
In order to do this, he alters 
the relationship between 
the audience and the play. 
He does this so that they 
view the play critically. I felt 
that this was definitely 
achieved, especially when 
the backdrop opened up at 



the end revealing Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium. Brecht 
wants items used to be 
clearly visi\- 

When 1 fir.st walked into 
the Little Theatre. I was 
really impressed. The 
unique shajje of the stage, a 
pentagonish shape with two 
strangely shaped platforms 
on the front left coiikm-. 
stuck out to me immediate- 
ly. Next, 1 noticed the five 
tables placed directly in 
front of the stage. The tables 
and chairs were black with a 
blood red table cloth placed 
on top of them. 

The orchestia is located 
on the stage in the back 
right corner, which is anoth- 
er thing that Brecht insisted 
upon in his pla.\s. The 
instruments featured were 
keyboard, banjo, reeds, 
trumpets, trombone and 
percussion. I personally had 
never seen an orchesti'a on 
stage during a play and 1 
was worried that the sound 
would take away from the 
actors and actresses voices: 
I was wrong. 

The music, which was 
composed by Kurt Weill and 
directed by Brent Register, 
was amazing. It was soft 
and not overpowering, but 
loud enough that the audi- 
ence could hear it. 

The backdrop was defi- 
nitely one of the most inter- 
esting parts. When 1 walked 
in. it was a yellow and 
redish .•~ort of pattern with 



the words "Die 

Dreigroschenoper" printed 
upon it, .\s the play pro- 
gressed, 1 noticed that song 
names, .scene titles and loca- 
tions would appear on it. 

The pla\ take> place in 
London, before and during 
Queen Victoria's coronation 
in 1S:{7. I found that the cos- 
tumes were ver\ a|)|)r()pri- 
ate for the time setting and 
location. The drab coloi's 
demonstrated that these 
people were indeed not 
wealthy. The girls' dresses 
were \ery intricatelx 
designed and fit their bodies 
pi'i-fectly. of coui'se. they 
were a httle tight in the 
bosom, but that's what 
makes them look like 
whores. 

The play starred Travis 
Dane Uhl as .Mr. Jonathon 
-leremiah Peach uni. 

(labiielle Greco as Mrs. 
Celia Peachum. .Maggie 
Mayer as Polly Peachum. 
Kara Karstedt as Jenny 
Divers. Holly Mitchell as 
Lucy Brown. Joey Pettine as 
Tiger Brown and most 
importantly, Lashard 

Griffith as Capt. Macheath 
aka Mack the Knife. 

I would like to say first 
and foremost that Griffith 
and Greco played their redes 
perfectly. Mrs. Peachum 
(Greco) was the alcoholic 
mother of Polly Peachum 
who marries IVlacheath. 
Greco's aggressive attitude 
fit her ch.iracter xcrv well. 




Her \-oice tilled the entire 
tht'alre heciuse it was >o 
stroiiL: .'ind pnwei'ful. There 
wei'e certain parts of the 
play where I was actually 
intimidated \)\ her because 
of how evil she looked. She 
excelled in her solo song 
"Ballad of Sexual 

Dependence" where she 
addrt'.-.^e:-. thr tact that 
Macheath will definitely 
cheat (tn her daughter 
because Ik cannot control 
his urges. 

Griffith was perfectly 
cast as Macheath. His deep 
voice and ma.sculine appear 
ance flattei's Macheath. who 
is a notorious con arti-t. I 
think Griffith's greatest 
moment was when he was 
singing "Tlu> Army Song" 
with Tiger Brown (Pettine). 
These two manly men 
paraded around stage doing 
show-girl style dances. 
which 

See "OPERA" on page 
8. 



October 12, 2006 



Tiffi CLARION CALL 



Paged 



"Gllmore Girls" new director clianges everytiiing 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond®clarlon.edu 




"Gllmore Girls" 
Network: The CW 
Director: David Rosenthal 

"Gilmore Guls" has cap- 
tured the hearts of viewers 
for seven seasons. The show 
features a distinct style that 
sets the episodes apart from 
anything else on television 
today. 

The series stars Lauren 
Graham as Lorelai and 
Alexis Bledel as Rory. The 
mother and daughter go 
through life together in the 
fictional town of Stars 
Hollow, sharing a unique 
friendship and learning 



from each other. 

Through the past six 
seasons, the witty banter 
between all of the charac- 
ters has served as the trait 
that separates the show 
from the rest. 

To me, this was the 
thing that made the show 
great. The storylines were 
good, but nothing we 
haven't seen before. 

The characters always 
.spoke so quickly and confi- 
dently. There were always 
clever come-backs or funny 
anecdotes in every conversa- 
tion. They added in pop cul- 
ture for a mix that was 
something I envied. 

In April of this year. 
Amy Sherman-Palladino 
and Dan Palladino, the pro- 
ducers since the start of the 
series, announced that they 
would be leaving the show. 

Allegedly, the couple 
wanted to stay with the 
show for at least two more 
years, but the studio would 
only offer a one-year deal. 

"We know that the story 
lines from this season will 
carry on into the next, and 
that the integrity of the 
show will remain long after 



we leave Stars Hollow," said 
the Palladinos in a state- 
ment announcing their 
departure 
(httpV/www.tvguide.com). 

But, I'm not so sure that 
this promise has been kept. 

This year, David 
Rosenthal took their place 
as writer/producer for the 
show. It is now on the new 
CW network at its normal 8 
p.m. slot on Tuesdays. 

I expected that there 
would be some changes to 
the show, but I was also con- 
fident that Rosenthal would 
keep it the same. 

Only two episodes into 
the seventh season, I have 
been left with the horrible 
feeling that not only is one 
of my favorite shows in its 
final stretch, but what it 
used to be has already dis- 
appeared. 

In the season premiere, 
viewers were forced to wit- 
ness the end of Lorelai and 
Luke's relationship. 

Although every viewer 
has different views on what 
should happen, I think it's 
safe to say that everyone 
was puUing for those two. 

Lorelai sauntered 



around when Rory wasn't 
around, not allowing her to 
know what really happened. 
Rory was also mourning the 
departure of her boyfriend, 
Logan, to London. 

I knew that the charac- 
ters had to deal with what 
had happened on the finale, 
but it was a disappointment 
to be forced to deal with a 
sad Gilmore house. 

Midepisode, though, I 
was given a flicker of hope. 
Lorelai and Rory decided to 
play racquetball in order to 
escape from their problems. 
I could just see the quick 
quips at each other and 
laugh-out-loud situations 
the girls were about to get 
themselves into. 

But, once again I was 
crushed. The scene opened 
with the mother and daugh- 
ter sitting on the court talk- 
ing (at a normal speed I 
must add). When they final- 
ly decided to get up to play, 
one fast-flying ball past 
Lorelai's head sent the two 
packing. 

The second episode did 
nothing for me, either. The 
two women were still deal- 



ing with their relationship personality 



issues. Rory's friend Lane's 
disappointment with her 
first experience with sex 
provided some comic relief. 
And Lorelai's attempt to 
redecorate her home Asian- 
style to get her mind off of 
Luke and Rory's mind off of 
Logan started out promis- 
ing, until Rory stormed off 
after finding out that her 
mother slept with 

Christopher, Rory's father. 

After the first episode, I 
still had hope since there 
were obviously loose ends 
that had to be tied. But after 
the second, I am beginning 
to think that what the show 
was is gone. 

The pop culture refer- 
ences have almost been 
completely demolished, 
aside from a few about 
Gwyneth Paltrow thrown in 
with no real direct ties to 
the story. 

Also, the few attempts 
to give the town their wacky 
feel (i.e. Kirk crashing a car 
into Luke's Diner or 
Lorelai's interior design 
attempts) did not flow as 
they used to nor did they 
capture the town's unique 




From an artistic view, 
the way the scenes are shot 
has also changed. As a regu- 
lar viewer, the high use of 
close-up shots of the charac- 
ters' faces stuck out to me 
particularly in the second 
episode. These may have 
been used in the past, but 
not in an amount that was 
noticeably awkward. 

AH in all, I will still be 
watching this season with 
hopes that the old show I 
have grown to love will 
return. 

Unfortunately, I don't 
see that happening with the 
direction Rosenthal is tak- 
ing it now. 

I'm afraid that one of my 
favorite shows will never be 
the same. 



"Freakshow" doesn't deserve prime spot G-Love Changes their SOUnd 



Dominic Giallombardo 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_djgiallomb@clarion.edu 




"Freakshow" 

Network: Comedy Central 

Rating: 2/5 



♦♦ 



On October 5, Comedy 
Central launched its next 
try at an animated comedy. 
"Freakshow" had its world 
premier at 10:30 p.m., right 
after the season premiere of 
"South Park." 

The show consists of five 
(or six) main characters. 
There are Tuck and Benny, 
Siamese twins, who have 
the amazing power to sepa- 
rate. Hence the reason there 
is sometimes five charac- 
ters, and sometimes six. 
There is: the Bearded Clam, 
who can shoot "bitch juice!" 
The World's Tallest 
Nebraskan, who can shrink 
up to six inches; Primi, the 
pre-mature baby, who has 
the power of pinpoint vomit- 
ing; and finally, the Log 
Cabin Republican, who 
turns into the Burly Bear. 



The team is given very 
low profile cases. Instead of 
taking down the ruthless 
dictator, the General, the 
team is sent to his island to 
steal Perry nuts for the 
President of the U.S.A. 

While there, they are 
captured and face the 
General's new killing 
machine. 

The team then unites 
and creates a giant male 
model who then saves the 
team. The team manages to 
escape with one nut and get 
back to the states via the 
porta-potty teleportation 
device. 

While the team is away, 
their freak-show is con- 
demned because their rival 
has tipped off the authori- 
ties that their boss has ille- 
gal pastries. 

The General is definitely 
my favorite character intro- 
duced in this episode. He is 
from Argentina and has a 
German accent. The chief 
export of his country is 
human blood. 

As he drives away from 
the team, he yells back at 
them, "You will not be greet- 
ed as liberated, you fools, 
you will be denied roses and 
chocolates." Right after he 
says this, the song "I wish I 
was in Dixie" plays. 

The animation of this new 
show is drawn in 2-D and 
isn't very original. 

Most new animated 
series have some kind of 
special animation. "South 
Park" is comprised of con- 
struction paper animation. 
"Drawn Together" and 




Grace Regalado 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

5_gvregalado@clarion.edu 



"Family Guy" are drawn in 
a similar fashion that quite 
life like but still is very ani- 
mated. 

The animation in 
"Freakshow" looks as if it's 
from the mid-1990s. 

True, a break is some- 
times good from the comput- 
er generated shows, but this 
approach doesn't seem to fit 
the idea of the show. 

This new series deserves 
two out of five leaves. It's 
nothing special, and for a 
premiere episode, it didn't 
impress me as much as I 
had expected. 

It's possible the show 
lost some appeal because it 
was aired directly after an 
amazing episode of "South 
Park," but the producers 
should have expected this 
and gone all out to jump 
start the fan base. 

Given the prime spot 
between "South Park" and 
"The Daily Show with Jon 
Stewart," "Freakshow" was 
handed an audience who 
was expecting an amazing 
show. They were let down, 
and only given mediocrity. 




"Lemonade" 
Band: G-Love and 
Special Sauce 
Rating: 5/5 



"OPERA" continued 
from page 7. 

was hysterical. They light- 
ened up the entire play for 
me and allowed me to laugh 
aloud at their crazy antics. 

Mayer did a wonderful 
job portraying Polly 
Peachum's whiny, little girl, 
naive personality. Mayer's 
singing ability did not come 
close to her acting ability. I 
felt that she sings much bet- 
ter when she is singing 
lower, yet stronger. During 
"Pirate Jenny," Mayer had 
to sing very lightly and 
high-pitched. Her voice 
struggled a little bit, but 
when she was belting out 
the song at the top of her 
lungs, she sounded spectac- 
ular. 

I felt that Uhl (Mr. 
Peachum) did not have as 
much energy on stage as the 
other performers. His char- 
acter was very important in 



some scenes and I just don't 
think he was there. I think 
he has a wonderful speaking 
voice, but not a singing 
voice. His singing was very 
weak compared to the other 
performers. When his 
daughter gets married, he is 
supposed to be furious with 
her and Macheath, and I 
just didn't see or feel the 
fury from him. I think per- 
haps that this was just not 
the best character for Uhl to 
be playing. 

Macheath marries Polly 
in the beginning of the play 
and, as it is found out later, 
has yet another wife, Lucy 
Brown (Mitchell). 

Meanwhile, he has a not-so- 
secret love affair going on 
with Jenny Divers 
(Karstedt), who resides in a 
whorehouse. His inability to 
control his sexual urges 
with multiple women was 
typical of men at that point 
in time. 

The chemistry between 



Macheath and Polly seems 
almost forced and is very 
unrealistic, which I thought 
was how it was supposed to 
appear until the end when 
Macheath chooses Polly. 

However, the chemistry 
between Macheath and 
Lucy and Macheath and 
Jenny was so much 
stronger. When Macheath 
and Jenny were on stage 
performing "Tango Ballad," 
I could see the lust and pas- 
sion that these characters 
felt for one another. Also, 
when Lucy Brown sang 
"Barbara Song" while 
Macheath is in jail, 
Macheath was groping her 
in numerous ways that he 
would never have touched 
Polly, which made me think 
he cared more deeply for 
Lucy 

In regards to Karstedt, 
at first I thought she had a 
scratchy voice, may be due 
to a sore throat, but then 
towards the end I realized 



CLARION, Oct. 12 -Garret 
"G-Love" Button hit the 
scenes in Philly 12 years 
ago with his alternative 
hip-hop and blues band, G- 
Love and Special Sauce. 

The band is a trio and 
had previously collaborated 
with other popular artists 
such as Jack Johnson, 
Tristan Pettyman, Ben 
Harper and also performed 
with the Sublime-like band. 
Slightly Stoopid. 

G-Love and Special 
Sauce had recently signed 
on with Brushfire Records, 
home record company of 
friend and fellow singer- 
songwriter. Jack Johnson. 

This past August, G- 
Love had released the 
album, "Lemonade". 

"Lemonade" is G-Love's 
seventh studio album since 
the self-titled "G-Love and 
Special Sauce" and 
acclaimed "Philadelphonic" 
releases back in the mid 
90s. The new "Lemonade" 
had debuted at #39 on the 
U.S. charts. 

Since G-Love had 



signed on with Jack 
Johnson, G-Love's upbeat 
and hip-hop sounding 
rhythm has turned into a 
more mellow, light and 
warm acoustic feel. 

The first single off the 
album entitled, "Hot 
Cookin"' first made its way 
on the XM Satellite radio 
station XM Cafe. The 
album's fresh squeezed, 
sweeter than sour sounds 
are eno,ugh to keep anyone 
chill and relaxed after a 
long day. 

The song "Hot Cookin"' 
was written by G-Love 
where he also plays guitar, 
harmonica and sings the 
vocals. The song sounds 
soulful yet the lyrics are 
filled with how he expresses 
his feeUngs, for example, 
"because there's some hot 
cookin' going on tonight and 
the temperature is burnin' 
just right." 

He uses the phrase 'hot 
cookin' as a type of 
metaphor saying that 
there's something going 
through his feelings and all 
he has to do is keep it up 
and hopefully something 
would ignite. 

He also repeats "don't 
let 'em cool you down" in 
the beginning. To me I took 
this phrase as sort of a con- 
fidence booster, telling him- 
self not to give up. 

"Ride" is the opener of 
the album, its catchy 
"groove-getting on sound" 
also holds positive enlight- 
enment. In the lyrics, "How 
does it feel when you're 
going nowhere, why don't 
you stop sometime and let 
it ride," I interpreted that 
as something influential. 
The lyrics make you stop 
and think how people 
shouldn't worry. 

As scary as it is being in 
college and realizing you 




only have a year or two to 
go until you find yourself 
living the "real world" peo- 
ple, especially college stu- 
dents should be living one 
day at a time. 

There is never a need to 
reflect on the past or worry 
too much into the future 
when in reality no one will 
ever know if they have a 
chance at tomorrow. 

His lyrics also say 
something when he sings, "I 
know what I know, I don't 
know nothing else, but if 
you teach me something, I'd 
sure appreciate the help." 
To me, it's almost like he's 
asking for some life dab- 
bling insights as in the song 
he continues singing with, 
"they say you only hear 
what you want to hear, but 
I can only hear this guitar 
ringin' in my ear." 

The album's collections 
of songs are all catchy and 
something to just either sit 
back, enjoy the groove to or 
to help you relax and collect 
some thoughts while you're 
washing dishes in procras- 
tination for exams. 

All in all I give this 
album the full five. Anyone 
who enjoys sitting out in 
the shade sipping a glass of 
lemonade, or more realisti- 
cally because this is 
Clarion, we can pretend 
there's shade sun and fun 
all filled up in G-Love's 
"Lemonade." 



that she had a rather strong 
voice. She was being cheat- 
ed by the microphone sys- 
tem, which became progres- 
sively worse throughout the 
play, reaching its peak in 
scene eight. The problem 
became extremely obvious, 
but the performers proceed- 
ed as if nothing was wrong. 
They just projected their 
voices louder so the audi- 
ence could still hear them. I 
definitely give them credit 
for that. 

Macheath has four lack- 
eys: Readymoney Matt (Ben 
Rowan), Crookfinger Jake 
(Michael Deibert), Walt 
Dreary (Greg Pioretti) and 
Bob the Saw (Tara Haupt). I 
really like these characters. 
They were all very obedient 



in following Macheath's 
orders, but did not know 
how to keep their mouths 
shut when it comes to 
Macheaths other women. 

The lighting was very 
appropriate and worked and 
in hand with the make-up. 
The performers' eyes had 
dark make-up around them. 
The way the light hit their 
face at an upward angle 
made them look intimidat- 
ing. Although, sometimes, 
the lighting was not directly 
on the performers on stage; 
sometimes this was on pur- 
pose, especially when Mrs. 
Peachum and Jenny were in 
the street, it was meant to 
appear as if they were in the 
dark. 

Overall, I thoroughly 



enjoyed myself. It was not 
only very well directed, but 
very well performed. Each of 
the performers portrayed 
their characters excellently. 

I would definitely rec- 
ommend this play to stu- 
dents and adults, but not 
necessarily to children due 
to the sex and drugs 
involved. 

I gave this play a four 
out of five, only because I 
felt that the first act 
dragged on forever as well 
as the technical difficulties. 
I do not think that these 
things are significant 
enough to say anything bad 
about the play as a whole. 



October 12. 2006 



THE CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



ClissitMs 



lircck \\k Tnivii Eiiipliijiiiciil, For Iti'iil, hmmk and lii>ni'nil \k 




Congrats to sister of the 
week, Brittany Hartz! 
-V Your AZ Sisters 

Congrats to Kylee Blasko on 
chair of the week! 
-If Your AZ Sisters 

Congratulations to 

Homecoming Queen Sheena 

Zawacki! 

-Love, the (|)II Alumnae 




NCASC meeting- October 
16 at 7 p.m. in 248 
Qemmell! Come hear a com- 
munication professor speak 
and get involved in our club! 

Watch WCUB-TV 
On Campus channel 5 
Adelphia Cable Channel 15 

News at 7 p.m. each night. 
Off the Bench Mondays at 
7:30, Sports Night 

Thursdays at 7:30 and 
watch for other programs 



soon 



Come watch "Pirates of the 
Caribbean: Dead Man's 
Chest." 8 p.m. MPR. 
Thursday & Friday 8 p.m. 
Gemmell Food Court, 
Saturday 

WCUC 91.7 

Hippie Chick Radio, 
Wednesday 9 p.m-midnight. 
It's timeless cool! 

Cowboys & Outlaws 
Thursday 6 p.m.- 9 p.m. 
It's timeless cooH 



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Some include utilities. Rent 
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A selection of houses and 
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Happy 20th Birthday 

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- V Steph 



Coming home soon. 

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Come back soon! 

- ¥ Tina 

Bosom Buddy, 

What a wonderful past few 
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P.S. Try not to hit any wood- 
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IT BB 




Watch'a know about 
the Mighty Ducks? 



Take The Clarion Call "Mighty Ducks" Quiz! 
by Bryan Bingham 



1. What district are the mighty ducks from? 

a) District 1 c) District 5 

b) Districts d) District 7 

2. What was the name of the Hawks coach? 
a) Jack Riley c) Paul Stanley 




6. Who was 
land game? 

a) Robertson 

b) Banks 



the only player to miss a penalty shot in the ice- 



c) Fulton 

d) Conway 



b) 



Mike Bannon 



d) 



Wolf Stanson 



3. Who has the nickname cake eater? 

a) Charlie c) Jesse 

b) averman d) Banks 

4. How many hours of community service does Bombay 
end up with? 

a) 200 c)400 

b) 300 d) 500 

5. What is the name of the iceland trainer? 

a) Sofia c) Jenna 

b) Maria d) Sara 



7. What company sponsors team USA? 

a) Bauer c) Hendrix 

b) CCM d) Easton 

8. What team were they playing when Coach Mckay had to 
take over? 

a) Jamaica c) Sweeden 

b) France d) Germany 

9. What team does Bombay play for at the beginning of D2? 

a) Sharks c) Bombers 

b) Waves d) Thrashers 

10. How many players were added to the ducks in the begin- 
ning of D2? 

a) 5 c)7 

b) 6 d) 8 



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Laurkis Macek 

Senior, Communication 
"We have to work on rebuilding 
Ben's confidence." 




By 
Bethany Ross 



'What do you think 

it s going to take to 

turn the Steeler s 

losing streak around 

and win this season? 




Tiffany Jo Seese 

Senior, Education 

*Once Ben gets back into the swing of things 

and our "Burgh Boys" come down off the 

hype of Super Bowl XL. We have a strong 

and talented group of guys!" 






Gabf. Proietti 

SopiKiMORi;, Thkatre 

"The Steeler's defense is really tough. I 

think the offensive line needs to give more 

protection for Ben." 



Dan ZANtjRiLLi 

Senior, Communication 
"Jerome Bettis and Antwan Randel El." 



Beth Barringer 

Senior, Speech Communication 

"Maybe they just need a 

little more practice." 



James Lon<; 

Sophomore, Musical Theatre 

"I think they need to work together 

more. Also, Cowher needs to make some 

better choices." 




October 12, 2006 



THE CLARION CALL 



Paged 



''Gilmore Girls" new director clianges everytiiing 



October 12, 2006 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s stHli.'siiiuml@claiion,odii 




"Gilmore Girls" 
Network: The CW 
Director: David Rosenthal 

"Giimoi'i' Girls" has cap- 
tured the hearts of viewers 
for seven seasons. The show 
features a distinct style that 
sets the episodes apart from 
anything else on television 
today. 

The series stars Lauren 
Graham as Lorelai and 
Alexis Bledel as Rory. The 
mother and daughter go 
through life together in the 
fictional town of Stars 
Hollow, sharing a unique 
friendship and learning 



from each other. 

Through the past six 
seasons, thi- witty banter 
between all of the charac- 
ters has served a.s the trait 
that separates the show 
from the rest, 

To me. this was the 
thing that made the show 
great. The storylines were 
good, but nothing we 
haven't seen before. 

The characters always 
spoke .so (juickly and confi- 
dently. There were always 
clever come-backs or funny 
anecdotes in every conversa- 
tion. They added in pop cul- 
ture for a mix that was 
something I envied. 

In .April of this year. 
Amy Sherman- Pal ladino 
and Dan I'alladino. the pro- 
ducers since the start of the 
series, announced that they 
would be leaving the show. 

.Allegedly, the couple 
wanted to stay with the 
show for at least two more 
years, but the studio would 
only offer a oncyear deal. 

"We know that the story 
lines from this season will 
carry on into the next, and 
that the integrity of the 
show will remain long after 



we leave Stars Hollow," said 
the I'alladinos in a state- 
ment announcing their 
departure 
(httpV/www.t vguide.com). 

Hut, I'm not ,so sure that 
this promise has been kept. 

This year. David 
Ro.scnthal took their place 
as writer/producer for the 
show. It is now on the new 
CW network at its normal 8 
p,m, slot on Tuesdays. 

! expected that there 
would be some changes to 
the show, but I was also con- 
fident that Rosenthal would 
keep it the same. 

Only two episodes into 
the seventh season. 1 have 
been left with the horrible 
feeling that not only is one 
of my favorite shows in its 
final stretch, but what it 
used to be has already dis- 
appeared. 

in the season premiere, 
viewers were forced to wit- 
ness the end of Lorelai and 
Luke's relationship. 

Although every viewer 
has different views on what 
should happen. I think it's 
safe to say that everyone 
was pulling for those two, 

Lorelai sauntered 



around wlu'ii Hory wasn't 
around, not allowing lier to 
know what really happened. 
Rory was also mourning the 
departure of her boyfriend. 
Logan, to London. 

1 knew that the charac- 
ters had to deal with what 
had happened on the finale, 
but it was a tiisappointment 
to be forced to deal with a 
sad (jilmore house. 

Midepisode, though, i 
was given a flicker of hope. 
Lorelai and Hory decided tt) 
play racquet ball in order to 
e.scape from their problems. 
1 could just see the quick 
quips at each other and 
laugh-out-loud situations 
the girls were about to get 
themselves into. 

Hut, once again 1 was 
crushed. The scene opened 
with the mother and daugh- 
ter sitting on the court talk- 
ing (at a normal speed 1 
must add). When they final- 
ly decided to get up to play, 
one fast-flying ball past 
Lorelai's head sent the two 
packing. 

The second episode did 
nothing for me, either. The 
two women were still deal- 



is.-^ui'.-^. KorvV friend Lane's 
disappointment with her 
first experience with sex 
provided some comic relief 
.And Lorelai's attempt to 
redecorate her home Asian- 
style to get her mind off of 
Luke and Rory's mind off of 
Logan started out promis- 
ing, until Rory stormed off 
after finding out that her 
mother slept with 

Christopher, Rory's father. 

.After the first episode. 1 
still had hope since there 
were obviously loose ends 
that had to be tied. Fiut after 
the second. 1 am beginning 
to think that what the show 
was is gone. 

The pop culture refer- 
ences have almost been 
completely demolished, 
aside from a few about 
Gwyneth Paltrow thrown in 
with no real direct ties to 
the story. 

Also, the few attempts 
to give the town their wacky 
feel (i.e. Kirk crashing a car 
into Luke's Diner or 
Lorelai's interior design 
attempts) did not flow as 
they used to nor did they 
capture the town's unique 




'rom an artistic view, 
the way the scenes are shot 
has also changed. .As a regu- 
lar viewer, the high use of 
closeup shots of the tdiarac- 
ters' faces stuck out to riu' 
particularly in the .second 
episode. These may have 
been u.sed in the past, but 
not in an amount that was 
noticeably awkward. 

.AH in all, 1 will .still be 
watching this season with 
hopes that the old show I 
have grown to love will 
return. 

Unfortunately, I don't 
see that happening with the 
direction Rosenthal is tak- 
ing it now. 

I'm afraid that one of my 
favorite shows will never be 
the same. 



ing with their relationship personality. 



"Freakshow" doesn't deserve prime spot G-LOVe Changes their SOUnd 



Dominic Giallombardo 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_djgial!oiTi b@clarion.edu 




"Freakshow" 

Network: Comedy Central 

Rating: 2/5 



## 



On October 5. Comedy 
Centi'al launched its next 
try at an animated comedy, 
"Freakshow" had its world 
premier at 10:30 p.m., right 
after the season premiere of 
"South Park," 

The show consists of five 
(or six) main characters. 
There are Tuck and Benny, 
Siamese twins, who have 
the amazing power to sepa- 
rate. Hence the reason there 
is sometimes five charac- 
ters, and sometimes six. 
There is: the Bearded Clam, 
who can shoot "bitch juice:" 
The World's Tallest 
Nebraskan, who can shrink 
up to six inches: Primi. the 
pre-mature baby, who has 
the power of pinpoint vomit- 
ing: and finally, the Log 
Cabin Republican, who 
turns into the Burlv Bear. 



The team is given very 
low profile cases. Instead of 
taking down the ruthless 
dictator, the General, the 
team is sent to his island to 
steal Perry nuts for the 
President ohhe U.S,A, 

While there, they are 
captured and face the 
General's new killing 
machine. 

The team then unites 
and creates a giant male 
model who then saves the 
team. The team manages to 
escape with one nut and get 
back to the states via the 
porta-potty teleportation 
device. 

While the team is away, 
their freak-show is con- 
demned because their rival 
has tipped off the authori- 
ties that their boss has ille- 
gal pastries. 

The General is definitely 
my favorite character intro- 
duced in this episode. He is 
from Argentina and has a 
German accent. The chief 
export of his country is 
human blood. 

As he drives away from 
the team, he yells back at 
them. "You will not be greet- 
ed as liberated, you fools, 
you will be denied roses and 
chocolates," Right after he 
says this, the song "I wish I 
was in Dixie" plays. 

The animation of this new 
show is drawn in 2-D and 
isn't very original. 

Most new animated 
series have some kind of 
special animation. "South 
Park" is comprised of con- 
struction paper animation. 
"Drawn Together" and 




"Family Guy" are drawn in 
a similar fashion that quite 
life like but still is very ani- 
mated. 

The animation in 
"Freakshow" looks as if it's 
from the mid-1990s. 

True, a break is some- 
times good from the comput- 
er generated shows, but this 
approach doesn't seem to fit 
the idea of the show. 

This new series deserves 
two out of five leaves. It's 
nothing special, and for a 
premiere episode, it didn't 
impress me as much as I 
had expected. 

It's possible the show 
lost some appeal because it 
was aired directly after an 
amazing episode of "South 
Park," but the producers 
should have expected this 
and gone all out to jump 
start the fan base. 

Given the prime spot 
between "South Park" and 
"The Daily Show with -Ion 
Stewart." "Freakshow" was 
handed an audience who 
was expecting an amazing 
show. They were let down, 
and only given mediocrity. 



"OPERA" continued 
from page 7. 

was hysterical. They light- 
ened up the entire play for 
me and allowed me to laugh 
aloud at their crazy antics. 

Mayer did a wonderful 
job portraying Polly 
Peachum's whiny, little girl, 
naive personality. Mayer's 
singing ability did not come 
close to her acting ability. I 
felt that she sings much bet- 
ter when she is singing 
lower, yet stronger. During 
"Pirate Jenny." Mayer had 
to sing very lightly and 
high-pitched. Her voice 
struggled a little bit, but 
when she was belting out 
the .song at the top of her 
lungs, she sounded spectac- 
ular. 

1 felt that Uhl (Mr. 
Peachum) did not have as 
much energy on stage as the 
other performers. His char- 
acter was very important in 



some scenes and I just don't 
think he was there. I think 
he has a wonderful speaking 
voice, but not a singing 
voice. His singing was very 
weak compared to the other 
performers. When his 
daughter gets married, he is 
supposed to be furious with 
her and Macheath, and I 
ju.st didn't .see or feel the 
fury from him. I think per- 
haps that this was just not 
the best character for Uhl to 
be playing. 

Macheath marries Polly 
in the beginning of the play 
and, as it is found out later, 
has yet another wife. Lucy 
Brown (Mitchell). 

Meanwhile, he has a not-so- 
secret love affair going on 
with Jenny Divers 

(Karstedt). who resides in a 
whorehouse. His inability to 
control his sexual urges 
with multiple women was 
typical of men at that point 
in time. 

The chemistry between 



Macheath and Polly seems 
almost forced and is very 
unrealistic, which I thought 
was how it was supposed to 
appear until the end when 
Macheath chooses Polly. 

However, the chemistry 
between Macheath and 
Lucy and Macheath and 
Jenny was so much 
stronger. When Macheath 
and Jenny were on .stage 
performing "Tango Ballad." 
I could see the lust and pas- 
sion that these characters 
felt for one another. Also, 
when Lucy Brown sang 
"Barbara Song" while 
Macheath is in jail. 
Macheath was groping her 
in numerous ways that he 
would never have touched 
Polly, which made me think 
he cared more deeply for 
Lucy. 

In regards to Karstedt. 
at first I thought she had a 
scratchy voice, may be due 
to a sore throat, but then 
towards the end I realized 



Grace Regalado 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

5_gvregalado@clarion.edu 



"Lemonade" 
Band: G-Love and 
Special Sauce 
Rating: 5/5 




CLARION, Oct. 12 -Garret 
"G-Love" Button hit the 
scenes in Philly 12 years 
ago with his alternative 
hip-hop and blues band, G- 
Love and Special Sauce. 

The band is a trio and 
had previously collaborated 
with other popular artists 
such as Jack Johnson. 
Tristan Pettyman, Ben 
Harper and also performed 
with the Sublime-like band. 
Slightly Stoopid. 

G-Love and Special 
Sauce had recently signed 
on with Brushfire Records, 
home record company of 
friend and fellow singer- 
songwriter. Jack Johnson, 

This past August, G- 
Love had released the 
album. "Lemonade", 

"Lemonade" is G-Love's 
.seventh .studio album since 
the self-titled "G-Love and 
Special Sauce" and 
acclaimed "Philadelphonic" 
releases back in the mid 
90s. The new "Lemonade" 
had debuted at #39 on the 
U.S. charts. 

Since G-Love had 



signed on with Jack 
Johnson. G-Love's upbeat 
and hip-hop sounding 
rhythm has turned into a 
more mellow, light and 
warm acoustic feel. 

The first single off the 
album entitled, "Hot 
Cookin'" first made its way 
on the XM Satellite radio 
station XM Cafe. The 
album's fresh squeezed, 
sweeter than sour sounds 
are eno.ugh to keep anyone 
chill and rela.xed after a 
long day. 

The song "Hot Cookin"' 
was written by G-Love 
where he also plays guitar, 
harmonica and sings the 
vocals. The song sounds 
soulful yet the lyrics are 
filled with how he expresses 
his feelings, for example, 
"because there's some hot 
cookin' going on tonight and 
the temperature is burnin' 
just right." 

He uses the phra.se 'hot 
cookin' as a type of 
metaphor saying that 
there's something going 
through his feelings and all 
he has to do is keep it up 
and hopefully something 
would ignite. 

He also repeats "don't 
let 'em cool you down" in 
the beginning. To me I took 
this phrase as .sort of a con- 
fidence booster, telling him- 
self not to give up. 

"Ride" is the opener of 
the album, its catchy 
"groove-getting on .sound" 
also holds positive enlight- 
enment. In the lyrics. "How 
does it feel when you're 
going nowhere, why don't 
you stop sometime and let 
it ride," I interpreted that 
as something influential. 
The lyrics make you stop 
and think how people 
shouldn't worry. 

As scary as it is being in 
college and realizing you 




only have a year or two to 
go until you find yourself 
living the "real world" peo- 
ple, especially college stu- 
dents should be living one 
day at a time. 

There is never a need to 
reflect on the past or worry 
too much into the future 
when in reality no one will 
ever know if they have a 
chance at tomorrow. 

His lyrics also say 
something when he sings, "I 
know what I know, I don't 
know nothing else, but if 
you teach me something, I'd 
sure appreciate the help." 
To me, it's almost like he's 
asking for some life dab- 
bling insights as in the song 
he continues singing with, 
"they say you only hear 
what you want to hear, but 
I can only hear this guitar 
ringin' in my ear." 

The album's collections 
of songs are all catchy and 
something to just either sit 
back, enjoy the groove to or 
to help you relax and collect 
.some thoughts while you're 
washing dishes in procras- 
tination for exams. 

All in all I give this 
album the full five. Anyone 
who enjoys sitting out in 
the shade sipping a glass of 
lemonade, or more realisti- 
cally because this is 
Clarion, we can pretend 
there's shade sun and fun 
all filled up in G-Love's 
"Lemonade," 



that she had a rather strong 
voice. She was being cheat- 
ed by the microphone sys- 
tem, which became progres- 
sively worse throughout the 
play, reaching its peak in 
scene eight. The problem 
became extremely obvious, 
but the performers proceed- 
ed as if nothing was wrong. 
They just projected their 
voices louder .so the audi- 
ence could still hear them. I 
definitely give them credit 
for that. 

Macheath has four lack- 
eys: Readymoney Matt (Ben 
Rowan). Crookfinger Jake 
(Michael Deibert). Walt 
Dreary (Greg Pioretti) and 
Bob the Saw (Tara Haupt). I 
really like these characters. 
They were all very obedient 



in following Macheath's 
orders, but did not know 
how to keep their mouths 
shut when it comes to 
Macheaths other women. 

The lighting was very 
appropriate and worked and 
in hand with the make-up. 
The performers' eyes had 
dark make-up around them. 
The way the light hit their 
face at an upward angle 
made them look intimidat- 
ing. .Although, sometimes, 
the lighting was not directly 
on the performers on stage; 
sometimes this was on pur- 
pose, especially when Mrs. 
Peachum and Jenny were in 
the street, it was meant to 
appear as if they were in the 
dark. 

Overall, I thoroughly 



enjoyed myself It was not 
only very well directed, but 
very well performed. Each of 
the performers portrayed 
their characters excellently. 

I would definitely rec- 
ommend this play to stu- 
dents and adults, but not 
necessarily to children due 
to the sex and drugs 
involved. 

I gave this play a four 
out of five, only because I 
felt that the first act 
dragged on forever as well 
as the technical difficulties. 
I do not think that these 
things are significant 
enough to say anything bad 
about the play as a whole. 



Clmitkis 



lirirk Ills, hihii fjiipliiiiiiciil. Fur liiiil, IVr.Miiiiil\. iiiiil lii'iicral Ids 




Congrats to sister of the 
week, Brittany Hartz! 
-^ Your A/, Sisters 

Congrats to Kylee Blasko on 
chair of the week! 
-V Your AZ Sisters 

Congratulations to 

Homecoming Queen Sheena 

Zawacki! 

"Love, the 011 .Alumnae 




Come watch ' Pirates of the 
Caribbean: Dead Man's 
Chest." H p.m. .MPR. 
Thursday & Friday. 8 p.m. 
Gemmell Food Court. 
Saturday 

WCUC91.7 

Hippie Chick Radio, 
Wednesday 9 p.m-midnight. 
It's timeless cool! 

Cowboys & Outlaws 
Thursday 6 p.m.- 9 p.m. 
It's timeless cool! 



NCASC meeting- October 
16 at 7 p.m. in 218 
Gemmell! Come hear a com- 
munication professor speak 
and get involved in our club! 

Watch WCUHTV 
On Campu.s channel S 
Adelphia Cable Channel 15 

News at 7 p.m. each night. 
Off the Bench Mondays at 
7:30, Sports Night 
Thursdays at 7:30 and 
watch for other programs 
soon! 

FRKK SAMPLES 

Lo.se 2-8 Ibs./wk! 

(I lost 9.5 lb.s/Ist 14 days~37 

lbs total) 

Money Back Guarantee 

Call for FREE Information 

814-764-376;^ 




Next to campus, various 
houses and apartments. 
Accommodating 1-4 stu- 
dents or groups of 3-4. 
Some include utilities. Rent 
starts at $1100 per semes- 
ter. Visit us online at 



www.aceyrentals. 

com or call Brian at 814" 

2271238. 

Inexpensive apartment in 
Shippenville, Pa., call 814" 
7823270. 

Two Bedroom apt. Fully fur 
niflhed. .Available Fall 20()(r 
Spring 2007. Call Patty at 
814-745-3121 or 814-229" 
1683. www.lakenapart 
ments.com 

A selection of houses and 
apts. available for Fall 2007- 
Spring 2008. Some close to 
campus. Fully furnished. 
Accommodations from 1-8 
people. Call Patty at 814" 
745 3121 or 814 229 1683. 
www. lakenapartments.com 

Room in Victorian Home 
close to University, reason- 
abe, includes all utilities & 
cable. Available Fall & 
Spring. Call Rebecca 814" 
226 5442 or after 1 p.m. 
814-226-5651. 

EAGLE PARK APART 
MENTS- FuUv 



furnished, includes utilities, 
W blocks from campus. 
Leasing for Spring. 
Summer, & Fall. SAFE, 
GLEAN, HE.MITIFUL 

(814) 2264300 

www, eaglepark.net 

House for ri'ut, with five 
bedrooms/2-baths for five 
students. .Available for 
spring and fall 2007 and 
spring 2008. Washer, dryer 
dtove and refrigeratoi 
included, off street parking. 
$1050.00 per .semester per 
student + utilities. Call 814 
226 8185 and leave a mes 
sage. 

GET AN EARLY START 
AND A GREAT DEAL! 

.ATI! .Apartments -call 814" 
354-2238 for clean, quality, 
affordable apartments that 
can accommodate 2 to 4 stu 
dents. 

.Apartments come with 
washer & dryer in each 
unit-within walking dis- 
tance to campus. 

SILVER S P R 1 N (J 
RENTALS- Apartments for 



2-4 people & houses for 3 8 
people a\ailal)li' lor the F.ill 
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•Three bedroom house* 

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•campus located on Wilson* 
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imAVEI. 



Black & 


whitt 


• 


Rain Rain Go 


.\way! 


Hey Hooniics' 


music la 


(led; 


ih 


("(lining 


hoiiic 


soon. 



t"(lul). 

Hope vou had fun at your 
firstA.L.F 

V G*St;ir 



Travel with STS to this 
year's top 10 Spring Break 
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c o m m i s s i 11 s . V i s i t 
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Ash, 










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"ina 









Hiipp> 
David! 
- ^ Steph 



JOlh 



liiiilulav 



Bosom Buddy. 

What a wonderful past few 
days it has been. 1 miss you 
so much already. Don't even 
think iibout taking me for 
wings, blooming onions or 
stromholi for a long time. 
P.S. Try not to hit any wood- 
en posts next time. 
V WW 




Watch'a know about 
the Mighty Ducks? 




Take The Clarion Call "Mighty Ducks" Quiz! 
by Bryan Bingham 



1. What district are the mighty ducks from? 

a) District 1 c) District 5 

b) District 3 d) District 7 

2. What was the name of the Hawks coach? 

a) Jack Riley c) Paul Stanley 

b) Mike Bannon d) Wolf Stanson 

3. Who has the nickname cake eater? 

a) Charlie c) Jesse 

b) averman d) Banks 

4. How many hours of community service does Bombay 
end up with? 

a) 200 c)400 

b) 300 d) 500 

5. What is the name of the Iceland trainer? 

a) Sofia c) Jenna 

b) Maria d) Sara 



6. Who was the only player to miss a penalty shot in the ice- 
land game? 

a) Robertson c) Fulton 

b) Banks d) Conwav 



7. What company sponsors team USA? 

a) Bauer c) Hendrix 

b) CCM d) Easton 

8. What team were they playing when Coach Mckay had to 
take over? 

a) Jamaica c) Sweeden 

b) France d) Germany 

9. What team does Bombay play for at the beginning of 1)2? 

a) Sharks c) Bombers 

b) Waves d) Thrashers 

10. How many players were added to the ducks in the begin- 
ning of D2? 

a) 5 c) 7 

b) 6 d) 8 



'B'OI. 'q'6 'PS'oZ'e-g 'q9 'Pt' 'Pe 'B2 '0 • I, :sjaMSUB 



Look for chances to win prizes &om our exclusive Clarion Call giveaways. 



^i»»«*»,»'|.: 



mfiere in Clarion? '• 



»•••• 



m|Pp" 




' Cs 





Check 
hack next 
week for 
the 
answer! 




Last week's answer: 

Costume Shop in 
Marwick-Boyd. 



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Lalirkn IVlACf:K 

Senior, Communication 
"We have to work on rebuilding 
Ben's confidence." 




By 

Bethany Ross 



"What do you think 

it s going to take to 

turn the Steeler s 

losing streak around 

and win this season? 




Tiffany Jo Seese 

Sfnior, Educaiion 

'Once Ben gets back into the swing of things 

and our "Burgh Boys" come down off the 

hype of Super Bowl XL. We have a strong 

and talented group of guys!" 






CiABK PROIE'rTl 

S( »l'l l()M< )KI , Till AIRI 

"The Steelers defense is really tough. I 

think the offensive line needs to give more 

protection for Ben." 





Dan ZANtjRii.r 




Si 


NIOR. 


C( )MMI INK 


M ION 


"Jerome 


Bettis 


and Antwan 


Randel El." 



Beth Bakrin(;ek 

Si NIOR, Spi Hc M Communication 

"Maybe they just need a 

httle more practice." 



James Lo\<; 

Soi'HoMORr, Muskai Thfatrf 

"I think they need to work together 

more. Also. Cowher needs to make some 

better choices." 




Page 10 



S/ifts^ 



Cross Country in action at Penn State 



Hffi CaJkRlQS CALL 



October 12. 2006 



Mm Fiiiilhall nli^s {k\m lollevball am Ml in Uais Inn 1mm 



Golf wins at St. Vincent's Invitational 



Katelyn Monrean 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kjmonrean@clarion.edu 

STATE COLLEGE, Oct. 7 - 
While the rest of the Clarion 
University was enjoying the 
Autumn Leaf Festivities on 
Saturday Oct. 7, the Golden 
Eagle cross-country team 
was hard at work in State 
College at the Penn State 
Invitational. 

The Golden Eagles were 
led by Tasha Wheatley and 
Chris Clark. Under the 
direction of Head Coach 
Jayson Reach, both the 
women's and men's teams 
improved. 

The men's team, led by 
Junior Chris Clark, finished 
tenth overall among 17 
teams at the meet with 275 
points. This was important 
in that the team among 
PS AC teams finished second 
following PSAC leader Lock 
Haven. 

Clark has continued to 
show progress throughout 
the course of the season. He 
is consistently running 
faster than the previous 
week. Another important 
aspect of the finish for the 
Golden Eagles, according to 
Coach Resch, "The team 
beat teams that were 
ranked ahead of Clarion 
most importantly Indiana, 



University [of Pennsylv- 
ania]." 

Individually Clark led 
the way with a tenth place 
finish with a time of 26:06. 
This time led Clark to place 
third among PSAC runners 
at the Penn State meet. 

Other Golden Eagle fin- 
ishers were junior Bill 
Herrmann (53rd), sopho- 
more Sean McFarland 
(54th), senior Travis 
Cyphert (71st), freshman 
Adam Sencek (87th), senior 
Sean Williams (90th), and 
freshman Josh Foulds 
(100th). 

The women's team was 
led by senior Tasha 
Wheatley, and they finished 
14th in the 16 team field. 

Coach Resch empha- 
sizes that Wheatley is con- 
tinuing to improve week to 
week. Tasha finished 19th 
overall at the meet with a 
time of 22:28. The remain- 
ing runners who are prima- 
rily freshmen and sopho- 
mores carried the team to 
the finish. 

Following Wheatley 
were sophomore CaitHn 
Palko (73rd), freshman 
Kaycee Shaffer (84th), 
freshman Suzanne 

Schwerer (86th), senior 
Autumn Shaffer (87th), 
sophomore Kate Ehren- 
sberger (95th), and fresh- 
man Meaghan Conroy 



(102nd). 

Wheatley's finish was 
third among PSAC runners 
at the event. Coach Resch is 
impressed with the runners 
'that follow Wheatley. He 
calls this group, "the pack" 
and this group of runners 
has improved their time by 
an entire minute this sea- 
son. 

This is a significant 
improvement when you con- 
sider that the entire race is 
run in typically under twen- 
ty-five minutes. The total 
team average time also is 
improving. On Saturday the 
team saw its average drop 
by twenty seconds. 

The team was also miss- 
ing an important component 
of their arsenal on Saturday. 
Erin Richard was sidelined 
due to injury last Saturday 
but is expected to begin 
competing again soon. 

The runners have one 
more chance to qualify 
and/or improve their PSAC 
qualifying times. This will 
take place on Saturday Oct. 
14 at the Slippery Rock 
Invitational. 

The team will then trav- 
el to Bloomsburg on Oct. 28 
for the PSAC competition 
where Clark and Wheatley 
are looking to improve on 
last year's finish. 



Detroit's system pieced together winning team 



Barry Svrluga 
Washington Post 

DETROIT - Dave Domb- 
rowski, finally, stood in the 
clubhouse in the basement 
of a ballpark early Saturday 
evening, dripping with 
champagne. He had felt it 
before, in 1997 when he was 
the general manager of the 
Florida Marlins, the expan- 
sion team that won the 
World Series. But he also 
oversaw the dismantling of 
that team, perhaps the 
harshest dose of baseball's 
economic reality anyone has 
had to endure. 

"No one," Dombrowski 
said, "should have to go 
through that." 

Yet what Dombrowski 
went through with the 
Marlins, and what he has 
now gone through as the 
president, CEO and GM of 
the Detroit Tigers, could 
serve as a blueprint for 
teams that have spent futile 
years playing for nothing in 
Detroit's case, 12 straight 
losing seasons. In advancing 
to the American League 
Championship Series by 
beating the New York 
Yankees three seasons after 
losing get this 119 games, 
Dombrowski and the Tigers 
have provided hope for just 
about any team out there. 

"You have to have a phi- 
losophy," Dombrowski said 
in the Tigers' clubhouse at 
Comerica Park, less than an 
hour after Detroit's chnch- 
ing victory. "And then you 
have to have good people to 
institute the philosophy. You 
have to stick to it. You have 
to believe in your people." 

And then, purposefully, 
he looked his questioner in 
the eye, as if this was the 
most important point. 

'There's no sense in tak- 
ing short cuts," Dombrowski 
said. ■ 

The Tigers, it seemed, 
didn't take a single short cut 
to get to where they will be 



Tuesday, facing the Oakland 
Athletics in Game One of 
the ALCS, on the brink of 
their first World Series 
appearance since 1984. 

They have what 
amounts to four key free 
agents, players who estab- 
lished themselves elsewhere 
and signed with Detroit. 
Catcher Ivan Rodriguez 
came aboard in 2004. Right 
fielder Magglio Ordonez, 
who homered in Game Four 
against the Yankees, signed 
on for five years and $75 
million in 2005. And lefty 
Kenny Rogers, the veteran 
journeyman, came aboard 
for two years and $16 mil- 
lion, what Manager Jim 
Leyland termed "a bargain," 
even for a 41 year old. 

Throw in closer Todd 
Jones, a Tiger during the 
lean years of the late 1990s 
who re-signed as a 38 year 
old free agent this year, and 
that's the extent of the 
splash the Tigers made in 
the free agent market. Only 
Ordonez could even come 
close to being considered a 
marquee signing Rodriguez, 
Rogers and Jones were con- 
sidered on the downside of 
their careers and there were 
questions about the knees of 
the former Chicago White 
Sox' slugger. 

The philosophy, then, 
was built from within, even 
if it was painful, and it 
began almost as soon as 
Dombrowski took over as 
team president in 2002 and 
accelerated when he 
assumed the general man- 
ager's duties the following 
season. 

Detroit picked up key 
pieces in obscure places. 
Jeremy Bonderman, the 
right bander who locked up 
the Yankees in Game Four, 
came as the player to be 
named in a three team trade 
that sent pitcher Jeff 
Weaver to the Yankees in 
the summer of 2002. 
Bonderman, at the time, 
hadn't logged a full season 



of professional baseball, yet 
he was thrown into the 
majors in 2003 where he 
went 6-19, and would have 
lost 20 games had the Tigers 
not taken measures to pre- 
vent it. 

"You learn from things 
like that," Bonderman said. 
"You don't ever forget it." 
In June 2002, they drafted a 
17 year old high school kid 
from Chula Vista, Calif., 
named Joel Zumaya, a right 
bander taken in the 11th 
round. Now, he's 21, occa- 
sionally hits 103 mph on the 
radar gun, and might be the 
best reliever in baseball. In 
the winter before the 2003 
season, they made a minor 
trade with Florida to 
acquire a left bander no one 
had ever heard of, Nate 
Robertson. This season, he 
was entrusted with starting 
Game One of the division 
series. 

And in 2004, when they 
had the second overall pick 
in the draft, they snapped 
up a right bander from Old 
Dominion University, Justin 
Verlander. The result, this 
season: a 17-9 record, a 3.63 
ERA and, in all likelihood, 
the AL rookie of the year 
award. 

"We had the best win- 
ning percentage in our 
minor league system" in 
2005, Dombrowski said, 
indicating that winning at 
those levels reflects talent. 
"And we've got more on the 
way." In 2006, Dombrowski 
said, the Tigers' minor 
league affiliates finished 
second in winning percent- 
age. 

There was, though, one 
other piece, and that was 
firing Tigers legend Alan 
Trammell and replacing him 
with Leyland, the manager 
on that 1997 Marlins team, 
the one who had been out of 
baseball for six years. 

"I think he was the dif- 
ference," Dombrowski said. 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s_ekbowseraclarion.edu 

GREENSBURG, Oct. 9 - 
The Golden Eagles got back 
on the winning track this 
week at the St. Vincent's 
Bearcat Invitational. 

Clarion finished five strokes 
ahead of California 
University of Pennsylvania 
for the win. Carnegie 
Mellon University finished 
in third place 18 shots off 
the lead. 

Clarion shot a 316 on 
the day to win their third 
event in its last four tries. 
Last week the Golden 
Eagles came up four shots 
short of Carnegie Mellon in 
the Westminster 

Invitational. 

Junior Justin Moose 
shot a 71 (-1) at Totter Ridge 
Golf Club this week to lead 



the Golden Eagles to victory 
Moose also won the individ- 
ual tournament at the 
Bearcat Invitational as he 
was one of only four players 
to break 80. 

The first place finish 
was Moose's first individual 
victory of the season but 
was his fourth consecutive 
top 10 finish. 

Junior Preston Mullens 
shot an 80, which was the 
second best round on the 
team. Seniors Tom Will, 
Justin Scott and Justin 
Cameron had 82. 8:3, 83 
respectively to round out the 
five-man team. 

Coach Al Lefevre was 
pleased with the perform- 
ance of the team on such a 
tough course. "Everyone 
played very hard and Justin 
[Moose] played a great 
round" said Lefevre. 

The Golden Eagles also 
fielded a second team in the 



Bearcat Invitational. The 
team was led by senior Mike 
Bancroft who shot an 80. 
PVeshnian Mike DeAngelo 
and senior Zach Szwast both 
shot an 84, while sophomore 
Nick Brucker shot an 87 and 
junior Mike Pisarchik shot 
an 88, 

Clarion heads into its 
last match of the season on 
Oct. 14 and 15 at Wrendale 
Country Club in Hershey. 
which plays host to the 
PSAC Championship. Last 
year the Golden Eagles won 
the team event by four 
strokes and Moose won the 
individual event by one 
stroke. 

"Winning this week gets 
us back on track and hope- 
fully we can shoot some low 
scores," Lefevre said. "We 
have the people to repeat, 
we just have to put it all 
together for two days." 



Volleyball goes undefeated in 
Clarion Days Inn Tournament 



Rob Rankin 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rwrankin@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 11 - The 
Golden Eagles Volleyball 
team went 4-0 in the 
Clarion Days Inn 

Tournament this weekend 
snapping their two game 
losing streak. 

The tournament was 
held in Tippin Gym and in 
the Recreational Center on 
Friday and Saturday. 

The Golden Eagle's 
played their first game 
against Geneva College. 
Clarion took the match 3-0. 

Clarion moved on to its 
second opponent on Friday 
evening. They were 

matched up against Davis 
and Elkins and won the 
match 3-2. 

On Saturday the Golden 
Eagles were matched up 
against two more oppo- 
nents. Clarion had Point 
Park University and East 
Stroudsburg University. 

In their first match the 



Golden Eagles took on Point 
Park. Clarion defeated the 
Pioneers three games to 
none by scores of 30-27, 30- 
20 and 30-20. 

Clarion headed into 
their final match of the tour- 
nament against East 
Stroudsburg. The Golden 
Eagles defeated the 
Warriors 3-0 by scores of 30- 
27, 30-24 and 30-27. 

Interim head coach Jodi 
Burns was pleased with the 
victories and the stellar play 
from the Golden Eagles. 

"Right now the team is 
really coming together," said 
Burns. "The quality that 
stands out the most with 
this team is their hard work 
ethic, hands down." 

The Golden Eagles used 
the four game winning 
streak in the Days Inn 
Tournament to help them 
win a pair of home matches 
on Monday Oct. 9 and 
Tuesday Oct. 10. 

Clarion's match on 
Monday was against 
Alderson-Broaddus College. 



The Golden Eagles quickly 
jumped out to a 2-0 lead 
over the Battlers. 

Clarion lost the next 
game to cut its deficit to 2-1, 
but came out victorious in 
the next game. 

Clarion opened up the 
second half of PSAC play on 
Tuesday against California 
University of Pennsylvania. 

The Golden Eagles won 
the first two games of the 
match, but then lost the sec- 
ond two games by a com- 
bined three points. 

Clarion came out with 
the victory in the end with a 
15-10 win in the final game 
for a 3-2 victory. 

The win was the Golden 
Eagles sixth straight victory 
and their first in the PSAC. 

The Golden Eagles are 
heading into the PSAC 
Crossover tournament in 
Shippensburg this weekend 
looking to continue their 
recent success. "Our team 
has the physical as well as 
the mental ability to do 
great things," said Burns. 




Bsthany Rma/The Clarion Call 
Ready, Set Spike - Outside Hitter (#9) Christina Ste/ner is shown here /n a recent Golden Eagles 
match. Clarion has won their last six matches all of which were at home. The Golden Eagles are 
heading to Shippensburg for the PSAC Crossower Tournament this weekend. 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



October 12. 2006 Tlffi CLARION CALL Page 11 

Football gets first victory of season against Cfieyney 



Chris Parks 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_csparks®clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Oct. 7 - With all 
of the A.L.F. and homecom- 
ing festivities taking place 
over the past week, the 
game against Cheyney was 
important for the Golden 
Eagles as they were looking 
for their first victory of the 
season. 

Once again, Clarion led 
at halftime 21-6, but the 
game was not decided until 
the last play. The Cheyney 
Wolves had the ball at their 
own 35 with 2:52 to play and 
drove to the Clarion 13-yard 
Une with just six seconds 
left in the game. 

Quarterback Derrick 
Murry threw a pass to the 
goal line, but pass interfer- 
ence was called on Clarion 
at the goal line with no tim.e 
remaining, so the Wolves 
had one final play from the 
two-yard line. 

Murry's final pass 
intended for Dominique 
Curry was broken up by 
senior cornerback Dwaon 
Woodard to give the Golden 
Eagles their first victory 
under Coach Jay Foster and 
on the season 21-18. 

The Golden Eagles came 
away victorious but still did- 
n't play a clean game. 




Bethany Rou/The Clarion Call 
First Victory- The Golden Eagles played Cheyney on Saturday in the homecoming game and got their first victory 21-18. The win 
improves Clarion's record to 1-5 overall and remains 0-1 in the PSAC. This weekend The Golden Eagles will travel to lUP 



Clarion had two key 
fumbles in the second half 
that led to Cheyney touch- 
downs. For the fifth 
straight game, Clarion did- 
n't score any points in the 
second half and have scored 
just six points total in the 
second half all season long. 

Overall Coach Foster 
was pleased with the result 
in Saturday's game against 



Cheyney. 

"Obviously, Dwaon 
Woodard had a tremendous 
game. His interception 
return for a touchdown got 
it started and the intercep- 
tion after our fumble down 
deep in our territory 
stopped a potential scoring 
drive late in the game," 
Foster said. 

"Matt Foradora had a 



big day and made a great 
catch on the Hail Mary to 
end the first half and once 
again Eddie Emmanuel had 
another day at the office 
with 150 yards." 

The quarterback time 
was split again between 
freshmen Mark Rupert and 
Tyler Huether with each 
seeing action. Huether had 
65 yards passing in his sec- 



ond game of the season. 
Coach Foster is going to con- 
tinue to play both of them 
through this week. 

"Every game that Tyler 
plays he will get better as 
will Mark. This competition 
is good for both of them and 
for the team as well. The 
best at the position will rise 
to the challenge." 

Defensively, Woodard 



:fiul defensive back Erik 
Yoiiish came up with big 
i lit tTcopt ions. Woodard 

started the scoring in the 
first quarter when he made 
his tirst interception and 
it'turnod it 54 yards for a 
touchdown. 

Woodard's performance 
on Saturday earned him D- 
2f()()tball. corn's National 
Defensive Player of the 
week. 

All American linebacker 
Matt Morris had eight tack- 
les, while Jimmy Simmons 
and Zach Gourley each had 
seven to pace the Golden 
Eagles. 

Next up for the Golden 
Eagles is a trip to PSAC 
West rival Indiana 

University of Pennsylvania, 
for lUP's homecoming week- 
end. 

Foster plans to have the 
team ready to go and look- 
ing for their second consecu- 
tive victory against first 
place lUP. "Indiana is a 
perennial contender. They 
are athletic, well coached, 
and in first place. We will 
show up and play." 

Kickoff is set for 2 p.m. 
this coming Saturday Oct. 
14. lUP comes in with a 
record of 4-1 overall and 2-0 
in the PSAC west after 
defeating Lock Haven 23-14 
last week. 



Major League Baseball offseason rumors 



Ken Berger 
Washington Post 



DETROIT - As the non- 
waivers trading deadline 
approached this past July, 
the Athletics monitored the 
Mets, wondering whether 
they'd receive a serious pro- 
posal for Barry Zito. 

That proposal never 
came. Omar Minaya and 
company, determined to 
upgrade their starting rota- 
tion, instead focused on the 
Astros' Roy Oswalt and the 
Giants' Jason Schmidt. 

That focus should shift 
toward Zito now, and by all 
appearances, it will. 

Oswalt no longer is 
available, having committed 
to the Astros, and Schmidt, 
a free agent, doesn't seem 



inclined to come to New 
York. 

The Mets will aggres- 
sively pursue Daisuke 
Matsuzaka, whom the Seibu 
Lions might post, but the 
hunch here is that the 
Yankees will win that bat- 
tle. They have been high on 
the right bander for years 
and were very upset last 
year when the Lions decided 
against posting him. 

On the flip side, the 
Yankees don't figure to be 
major players for Zito, 
whose numbers would likely 
take a significant hit in the 
American League East. 
That means the Mets should 
be the top bidders for Zito, 
who is an excellent fit 
because a) he wants the big 
stage of New York (or Los 
Angeles); b) he has a very 
close relationship with Mets 



pitching coach Rick 
Peterson, pre-dating even 
their four seasons together 
in Oakland; c) he is a 28- 
year-old innings-eater who 
has passed the 200-inning 
mark each of his six full big- 
league seasons; and d) his 
numbers should improve in 
the NL. 

Oh, and e) the Mets des- 
perately need fronthne 
starting pitching even more 
than they did at the dead- 
line, now that they have to 
essentially count out Pedro 
Martinez for next year. 

A 2007 rotation of Zito, 
Tom Glavine, John Maine 
and two from the Brian 
Bannister Mike Pelfrey 
Oliver Perez group sounds 
palatable. Knowing Minaya, 
though, he'll probably land a 
few other options that don't 
immediately come to mind. 



and perhaps the Mets can 
find a reasonable agreement 
with impending free agent 
Orlando Hernandez. But 
Zito clearly should be the 
centerpiece of the Mets' off- 
season. 

The Rangers, having 
done the right thing by fir- 
ing Buck Showalter, will 
give a serious look to 
Hokkaido Nippon Ham 
Fighters manager Trey 
Hillman. He'd be a bold 
hire. Hillman, once a man- 
ager in the Yankees' minor- 
league system, appears to 
have Showalter 's work ethic 
but not his controlling per- 
sonality. 

Look for Pettitte to 
return to the Astros, and 
don't be surprised if 
Clemens again decides to 
rest until late June and 
then with the Red Sox. 



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Playir of th« Gim< 

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TOK CLARION CALL 



October 12, 2006 




I estiva 



The Clarion Call Photographers: Shasta Kurtz, Ben Elliott, Misha Snyder, 
Jenifer Pobiete, Thomas Fair, Phil Drelick, Bethany Ross and Mike Cauvel 




^ 




Clarion volleyball downs lUP 3-2 

See "SPORTS" page 9 



One copy free 




Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 





CALL 



Volume 93 Issue 6 



October 19, 2006 



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S&T Bank donates $100,000 to Clarion University 



Krystal Finkbeiner 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_knfinkbein®clarion.edu 

CL\RION, Oct. 16 - S&T 
Bank donated $100,000 to 
be used toward Clarion 
University's new Science 
and Technology Building. 

A gift of $100,000 is just 
one of the many gifts given 
by S&T Bank. 

In the past, S&T has 
supported the university in 
numerous special events. 

According to University 
Relations, "Clarion is an 
important market for S&T. 
We are committed to provid- 
ing its residents with quali- 
ty financial services as well 
as avenues such as this 
donation that directly 
impact the futures of tomor- 
row's leaders of business 
and industry." 

This $31 million project 
is expected to be one of few 
Leadership in Energy and 








S&T Bank -The bank has donated $100,000 to Clarion University 
construction of the new Science and Technology Building. 

Environmental Design with Clarion University and 



Photo courtesy of University Relations 

to be used toward the 



(LEED), certified science 
buildings in the country. 

"As a community bank, 
we are very excited about 
this opportunity to partner 



assist in providing its stu- 
dents with the resources 
needed to help them pursue 
their future careers," said 
S&T President Todd Brice. 



Ashley Rodgers, sopho- 
more science major said, "I 
think that this donation is 
not only generous but, will 
further education in the sci- 
ence department," 



The Science and 
Technology Center will 
place an emphasis on stu- 
dent research. The current 
planetarium and auditori- 
um in Peirce Hall will also 
be renovated and add anoth- 
er 8,000 square feet to the 
complex. "I beheve the new 
building will help further 
the education program and 
let learning be more enjoy- 
able and convenient," said 
Rodgers. 

According to University 
Relations these new class- 
rooms will be equipped with 
wireless Internet. 

The construction is to 
begin after December and 
last until June 2008. The 
current classroom section 
will be demolished between 
July and December of 2008, 
with the existing Peirce 
Planetarium and 

Auditorium remaining as 
part of the new Science and 
Technology Building. 



Clarion University works to Increase performance grant 



Natalie Kennell 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_nekennell@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 17 - On 
Sept. 18, Clarion University 
was allotted a performance 
funding grant of $2,096,986; 
however, CUP is striving to 
become more competitive 
against other institutions in 
years to come. 

The grant was "awarded 
on the basis of demonstrat- 
ed success and continued 
improvement in key areas 
related to student achieve- 
ment, university excellence 
and operational efficiency," 
according to the 

Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education Web 
site (www.passhe.edu.) 

The purpose of the grant 
is to encourage and reward 
schools for demonstrating 
improvement in eight per- 
formance indicators, how 
they compared to peer uni- 
versities and also in com- 
parison to system-wide 
goals. 

According to the 
PASSHE Web site, the indi- 
cators in which they assess 
include student retention 



r 


I'l'i iti',ylv.ini,i St.itf ' Systom of HiqherTxiuc -itioti 1 
tiniv't sity Performance Funding Totals v, 1 


School 


Grant 


Bloomsburg 


$3,274.97 


'California 


$3,658,224 


Cheyney 


$370,523 


Clarion 


$2,096,989 


EastStroudsburg 


$1,829,709 


Ed in bore 


$922,845 


Indiana 


$3,930,191 


Kutztown 


$3,031,440 


Lock Haven 


$1,518,370 


Mansfield 


$860,060 


Millersville 


$4,902,390 


Shippensburg 


$1,823,952 


Slippery Rock 


$4,341,344 


West Chester 


$4,849,149 


1 



and graduation rates, 
degrees awarded, instruc- 
tional cost per student and 
the percentage of full-time 
tenured and tenure-track 
instructional faculty with 
terminal degrees in their 
discipline. 



Although the grant was 
the largest ever received 
since the program began in 
July 2000, Clarion 
University is > working 
toward improving certain 
aspects in order to become 
more competitive against 



other institutions. 

Linda Nolan, provost 
and academic vice president 
of Clarion University said, 
"We plan to increase the 
diversity of our students, 
faculty and staff. We will 
develop high demand pro- 
grams such as the criminal 
justice program, executive 
MBA, fine arts administra- 
tion and expand the high 
demand areas in communi- 
cation, library science, nurs- 
ing and allied health." 

Another key area is 
retention and graduation 
rates. Clarion University 
plans to increase these ele- 
ments by providing more 
opportunities for under- 
graduate research, scholarly 
activity, civic engagement, 
leadership and study abroad 
programs for students. 

One disadvantage 

Clarion University has is its 
geographic location. The 
number of students attend- 
ing a school is a crucial part 
of funding. Western Pa., as a 
whole, has a dechning popu- 
lation of college-age stu- 
dents. 

"We are a competitive 
school and are one of the 



most creative in providing 
exceptional opportunities 
for our students ... the 
Eastern schools have the 
advantage of drawing from 
a more populated geograph- 
ic location with an increase 
in the number of college age 
students," said Nolan. "Due 
to the lack of college-age 
students living in our imme- 
diate surrounding area, the 
main goal is to attract more 
students from the east, out 
of state, and international- 

ly." 

Nolan said, "1 am 
extremely optimistic that 
with the increase in student 
numbers, graduation and 
retention rates, and faculty 
productivity, we will see an 
increase in our performance 
funding next year." 

In addition, Nolan said, 
"There are also increases in 
utilities, salaries and other 
expenses; however, diversi- 
fying the revenue stream to 
meet expenses will be the 
next step. This is why state 
and federal grants have 
such an impact on budget- 
ing. More focus will be put 
on entrepreneurial activity 
as well." 



Numerous RSOs 
allocated money from 
supplemental funding 



CUP completes campus-wide 
technology upgrade 



Tina Sickler 

Clarion Call Managing Editor 

s_cjsickler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 16 - 
Student Senate met on Oct. 
16 to approve the allocation 
of money to recognized stu- 
dent organizations. 

The following organiza- 
tions were allocated money 
from supplemental funding 
by Treasurer Knebel: 

Student Honors 

Association was allocated 
$3,000 to attend the 
National Collegiate Honors 
Conference in Philadelphia. 
The event will run from Nov. 
15-19. The organization 
plans on sending five stu- 



dents. This motion was 
approved 21-0-0. 

The National 

Communication Association 
Student Group (NCASC), 
was allocated $3683.25 to 
attend a conference in San 
Antonio, TX., from Nov. 15- 
19. NCASC plans on taking 
up to 15 members, but 
received funding for five 
members to attend. , The 
organization plans on 
fundraising for the other 
members to attend. NCASC 
member, Amy L. Klawuhn 
will be presenting a paper at 
this conference. The motion 
was passed 20-1-0. 

See "RSO FUNDING" 
continued on page 2. 



Adam Mohney 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ajmohney@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 18 - The 
technology department at 
Clarion University recently 
completed a campus-wide 
technology upgrade worth 
over $500,000. 

The upgrade, which was 
done last school year and 
over the summer, was fund- 
ed by the $125 technology 
fee that students pay along 
with tuition during the 
2005-2006 academic year. 

The fee was added by 
the Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher Education 
(PASSHE) in order to grant 
students access to the most 
recent technologies while 
they are studying at a State 
System school, according to 
University Relations. 




Bethany RoM/TAe Clarion CM 
Tech Upgrade -Dan Burr uses equipment that was funded 
through student technology fees. 



The projects which were 
started last year and recent- 
ly completed include new 
wireless computer networks 
at both main campus and 
Venango, access to new 
librar\' resources, new sci- 
ence laboratories, updated 



software licenses, new digi- 
tal audio equipment and 
new laptop computers, 
according to university rela- 
tions. 

See "UPGRADE" 
continued on page 2. 



Page 12 



THE CLARION CALL 



October 12. 2006 



One copy free 




Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 





Clarion volleyball downs lUP 3-2 

See "SPORTS" page 9 




CLARIOM 




Volume 93 Issue 6 



October 19, 2006 



S&T Bank donates $100,000 to Clarion University 



Krystal Finkbeiner 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s., knfinkboin@clarion.edu 

CLAKIOX, Oct, 16 - S&T 
Bank donatod $1()0,0()() to 
he used toward Clarion 
Li n i vc rs i t y's now Sc io nee 
and Technologty Building. 

A Kift of $100,000 is just 
one of the manv gifts given 
by S&T Bank. 

In the past. S&T has 
supported the university in 
numerous special events. 

According to University 
Relations, "Clarion is an 
important market for S&T. 
We are committed to provid- 
ing its residents with quah- 
ty financial .services as well 
as avenues such as this 
donation that directly 
impact the futures of tomor- 
row's leaders of business 
and industry." 

This $.31 million project 
is e.xpected to be one of few 
Leadership in Energy and 




S&T Bank -The bank has donated $100,000 to Clarion University 
construction of the new Science and Technology Building. 



Pinvironmental Design 

(IjHRD). certified science 
buildings in the country. 

"As a community bank, 
we are very excited about 
this opportunity to partner 



with Clarion University and 
assist in providing its stu- 
dents with the resources 
needed to help them pursue 
their future careers," said 
S&T President Todd Brice. 



Photo courtesy of University Relations 

to be used toward the 



Ashley Rodgers, sopho- 
more science major said, "I 
think that this donation is 
not only generous but, will 
further education in the sci- 
ence department." 



The Science ;ind 
Technology Center will 
place an emphasis on stu- 
dent research. The current 
planetarium and auditori- 
um in Peirce Hall will also 
be renovated and add anoth- 
er 8,000 square feet to the 
complex. "1 believe the new 
building will help further 
the education program and 
let learning be more enjoy- 
able anil convenient," said 
Rodgers. 

According to University 
Relations these new class- 
rooms will be equipped with 
wireless Internet. 

The construction is to 
begin after December and 
last until June 2008. The 
current classroom section 
will be demolished between 
July and December of 2008. 
with the existing Peirce 
Planetarium and 

Auditorium remaining as 
part of the new Science and 
Technology Building. 



Clarion University works to increase performance grant 



Natalie Kennell 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s..nekennell@clanon.edu 

CLARIUN, Oct. 17 - On 
Sept. 18. Clarion University 
was allotted a performance 
fun Jing grant of $2,096,986; 
however, CUP is striving to 
become more competitive 
against other institutions in 
years to come. 

The grant was "awarded 
on the basis of demonstrat- 
ed success and continued 
impi'ovement in key areas 
related to student achieve- 
ment, university excellence 
and operational efficiency." 
according to the 

Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education Web 
site (www.passhe.edu.) 

The purpose of the grant 
is to encourage and reward 
schools for demonstrating 
improvement in (Mght per- 
formance indicators, how 
they compared to peer uni- 
versities and also in com- 
parison to system-wide 
goals. 

According to the 
PASSHE Web site, the indi- 
cators in which they assess 
include student retention 



1 


Pennsylvania State System of Higher Educrjtion 
University Performance Funding Totals 


School 


Grant 


Bloomsburg 


$3,2-4.97 


California 


$3,653,224 


Cheyney 


$370,523 


Clarion 


$2,096,989 


East Strouds burg 


$1,829,709 


Edinboro 


$922,845 


Indiana 


$3,930,191 


Kutztown 


$3,031,440 


Lock Haven 


$1,518,370 


Mansfield 


$860,060 


Millersville 


$4,902,390 


Shippensburg 


$1,823,952 


Slippeiy Rock 


$4,341,344 


West Chester 


$4.849149 





and graduation lates. .Although the grant wa.v 

degrees awarded, instruc- the largi'st ever j'cceived 

tional cost per student and since th(> program began in 

the percentage of full-time July jOdO, Clarion 

tenured and tenure-track University is working 

instructional faculty with tov/ard improving certain 

terminal degrees in their aspects in order to become 

discipline. more competitive against 



other institutions. 

Linda Nolan, provost 
and academic vice president 
of Clarion University said, 
"We plan to increase the 
diversity of our students, 
faculty and staff. We will 
develop high demand pro- 
grams such as the criminal 
justice program, executive 
\niA, fine arts administra- 
tion and expand the high 
demand areas in communi- 
cation, library science, nurs- 
ing and allied health." 

Another key area is 
retention and graduation 
rates. Clarion University 
plans to increase these ele- 
ments by providing more 
opportunities for under- 
graduate research. scholarly 
.uti\it\. civic engagement, 
leadership and study abroad 
programs for students. 

One disadvantage 

Clarion University has is its 
geographic location. The 
number of students attend- 
ing a school is a crucial part 
of funding. Western Pa., as a 
whole, has a declining popu- 
lation of college-age stu- 
dtMits. 

"We are a competitive 
school and aic one of the 



most creative in providing 
exceptional opportunities 
for our students ... the 
Eastern schools have the 
advantage of drawing from 
a more populated geograph- 
ic location with an increase 
in the number of college age 
.students." said Nolan. "Due 
to the lack of college-age 
students living in our imme- 
diate surrounding area, the 
main goal is to attract more 
students from the east, out 
of state, and international- 
ly." 

Nolan said, "I am 
extremely optimistic that 
with the increase in student 
numbers, graduation and 
retention rates, and faculty 
productivity, we will see an 
increase in our performance 
funding next year." 

In addition, Nolan said, 
"There are also increases in 
utilities, salaries and other 
expenses; however, diversi- 
fying the revenue stream to 
meet expenses will be the 
next step. This is why state 
and federal grants have 
such an impact on budget- 
ing. More focus will be put 
on entrepreneurial activity 
as well." 



Numerous RSOs 
allocated money from 
supplemental funding 



CUP completes campus-wide 
technology upgrade 



Tina Sickler 

Clarion Call Managing Editor 

s^cjsickler@clarion.edu 

CLARION. Oct. 16 - 
Student Senate met on Oct. 
!H to approve the allocation 
111 niuiit'y to recognized stu- 
dent organizations. 

The following organiza- 
tions were allocated money 
from supplemental funding 
b\- Treasu er Knebel: 

Student Honors 

Association was allocated 
S-iJHH) to attend the 
National Collegiate Honors 
ConfiTence in Philadelphia. 
The event will run from Nov 
■)-19. The organization 
plans on sending five stu- 



was 



dents. This motion 
approved 21-0-0. 

The National 

Communication Association 
Student (Jroup (NCASC). 
was allocated $3683.25 to 
attend a conference in San 
Antonio. TX.. from Nov. 15- 
19. NCASC plans on taking 
up to 15 members, but 
received funding for five 
members to attend. The 
organization plans on 
fundraising for the other 
members to attend. NCASC 
member. .Vmy L Klawuhn 
will be presenting a paper at 
this conference. The nnHion 
was pas.sed 20- LO, 

See "RSO FUNDING" 
continued on page 2. 



Adam Mohney 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

S_ajmoiinev&clarion i.:C<. 

CLARION. n.\ IS The 
technology department ;it 
Clarion University recently 
completed a campus-wide 
technology upgrade worth 
over .S500.000. 

The upgrade, which was 
done last school year and 
over the summer, was fund- 
t'll !>>• t|]i ^ 1 J") technology 
tee that students pay along 
with tuition during the 
2005-2000 academic year. 

The fee was added by 
the Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher Education 
(PASSHE) in order to grant 
students access to the most 
recent technologies while 
they are studying at a State 
System school, according to 
I'niversitv Relations. 




Bethany Ross/ The Clarion Call 
Tech Upgrade -Dan Burr uses equipment that was funded 
through student technology fees. 

The projects which were software licenses, new digi- 

started last year and recent- tal audio equipment and 

ly completed include new^ new laptop computers, 

wireless computer networks according to university rela- 

nt l)nth mam campus and tions. 
\enango, access to new 

library resources, new sci- See "UPGRADE" 

ence laboratories, updated continued on page 2. 



Page 2 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



October 19. 2006 



October 19, 2006 



Tffi CLAJRION CALL 



lews 



Page 3 



"hitoring center receives CRLA accreditation 



Kelly Pen nisi 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kpennlsi@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 17 -The 
Clarion University Tutoring 
Center has received accredi- 
tation from the College 
Reading and Learning 
Association (CRLA). 

This accreditation was a 
goal and objective for Lou 
Tripodi, the director of the 
Center for Academic 
Enrichment. 

The certification indi- 
cates that the Clarion 
University Tutoring Center 
has met the standards to 
become certified. The 
College Reading and 
Learning Association has 
set criteria at three levels; 
regular, advanced and mas- 
ter. The Clarion University 
Tutoring Center is at level 
one. 

There are numerous 



benefits that are offered by 
the CRLA. For one thing a 
CRLA tutor training hand- 
book is provided. They also 



In addition, it gives 
Clarion University a way to 
reshape the tutorial pro- 
gram and use creative ideas. 




Bethany RoM/Tfte Clarion Call 
Tutor, Lindsay Scallse-CUP tutoring center recieved accreditation. 



have the benefit of gaining 
experience through working 
with other professionals 
that attend CRLA 
Conferences. 



Another great benefit is 
that the program helps 
secure confidence within the 
faculty and staff and helps 
gain more respect towards 



the program according to 
Tripodi. 

Tutors for the program 
must go through a training 
process. During the process, 
there must be a minimum of 
10 hours of training com- 
pleted. Tutors must attend 
workshops and complete 
other methods of training 
also. 

"Various training meth- 
ods include workshops, 
department speakers, basics 
of tutoring, communication 
skills, ethics, and more," 
said Tripodi. 

Most importantly how- 
ever tutors must have an 
"A" or "B" average in the 
subject they are tutoring. 

"Thirteen [individuals] 
participated in this train- 
ing," said Tripodi. 

Students in need of 
tutoring services can obtain 
information through the 
tutoring center. 




The Clarion Call provides « svnoosis of h11 criminal 
investigations as cond; rion 

University Public Safety for the month of October 
2006. All information can be accessed on the Public 
Safety Web page. 

■ Matthew Mainnart, Zv. ot Kiitaniung, Fa., whs tited 
for underage consumption after a traffic stop in Lot G, 
on October 6 at 1:26 a.m. 

■ Thomas Shea, 19, of TVafford, Pa., was cited foi 
underage consumption after » trafRr f^tnp m Lot C r,x. 
October 6 at 1:26 a.m. 



Communication department name change approved 



Lindsay Grystar 
Clarior) Call Editor-in-Chief 

s_llgryst.ar@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 18 - Clarion 
University faculty senate 
recently voted to officially 
change the name of the 
Communication department 
to Mass Media Arts and 
Journalism, effective 

January 2007. 

The idea of changing the 
name has been in discussion 
for over a year now, and was 
changed to avoid confusion 
between the Speech 
Communication department 
and the current 

Communication depart- 
ment. 

"We believed that 
MMAJ better expresses who 
and what we are. We includ- 



ed arts because we believed 
it included the creative side 
of our work," said Dr. Susan 
Hilton, the current chair- 
person of the 
Communication depart- 
ment. 

The decision to change 
the name came out last 
January, and was discussed, 
then voted on by the faculty. 

"Then we approached 
CCPS and the university. We 
submitted the request to 
change the name of the cours- 
es, the name of the degree, 
the name of the program and 
the name of the department," 
said Hilton. The 

decision was then voted on 
and approved at Faculty 
Senate, then approved by the 
President. Because the 
process takes a full year to 
make it official, the name 



change will become official in 
January 2007. 

Students currently in the 
Communication department 
will be taking the .same class- 
es as always, and only the 
program name has been 
changed, not the check sheet. 



"I didn't hear about the 
name change until now, and 
as long as it is just the name 
changing, I think it is a good 
idea," said sophomore 
Communication major Katie 
Dulnikowski. 




Brittnee Koebler/T/ie Clarion Call 
Becker Hall - The majority of MMAJ classes are held in Becker. 



"UPGRADE" 
continued from front 
page 

Samuel Puleio, Jr., assistant 
vice president for computing 
services, also reported that 
updates were made on pre- 
vious technology fee projects 
that were completed in 
2003. This is the first 
upgrade of its kind since the 
technology fee was initiated 
by the PASSHE. 

Puleio said the wireless 
networks, which were 
installed at Still Hall on 
main campus and Rhodes 
Center at Venango, are just 
a phase in a project that will 
eventually make CUP an 
entirely wireless campus. 

"Over the next three 
years. Clarion will become a 
wireless campus. This effort 



"RSO FUNDING" 
continued from front 
page 

The Accounting Club was 
allocated $2,016 to attend 
the Instructional 

Management Accounting 
Conference in Cleveland. 
The organization plans to 
take nine students. The 
motion was approved 20-1- 
0. 

Senator Beck motioned 
to allocate $200 to the "Rock 
the Vote" campaign on Oct. 
28. Senator Pearce friendly 
amended this motion and 
wished to allocate up to, but 
not exceeding $500 to the 
event, minus standing con- 
tributions from other organ- 
izations. 



So far it will cost $400 
for the group, I am the 
Avalanche to perform, plus 
$100 for lodging. The event 
is being sponsored by the 
PoHtical Science 

Association, the College 
Republicans and the College 
Democrats. 

Dave Lammie was 
appointed the Student at 
Large. His duty is to repre- 
sent students on the Clarion 
Student's Association 

Board. CSA is in charge of 
funding for student organi- 
zations. The motion was 
passed 21-0-0. 

Nine students from the 
Non-Traditional Student 
Union met with Dr. Waple 
and expressed interest in 
reforming the organization. 



Students in NTSU are 
either 17 or younger, or 24 
or older, any age with chil- 
dren living with them, vet- 
eran, caregiver, or financial- 
ly independent or have had 
an interrupted sequence of 
education. 

Senator Dave Walsh of 
the Dining Committee said 
that the building of a new 
dining hall will take place in 
the future. The Dining 
Committee would like more 
representation from the stu- 
dents to discuss this matter. 
The next meeting will be 
held on pet. 24 in 210 
Egbert. 

Social Equity Week will 
be held Nov. 6 -10. This 
event will feature a series of 
speakers each night. 



Greek Service Day will 
be held Saturday Oct. 21. 
Beverly Health Care of 
Shippenville and Oil City, 
Clarion County YMCA and 
Clarion Parks will benefit 
from the service day. 

The next blood drive will 
be held on Nov. 7. 

Panhellenic Council will 
be holding a Parents Night 
Out on Nov. 11. 

Interhall Council 

revised and approved its 
constitution. They will also 
be having a basket giveaway 
which features shower 
items, candy and food, laun- 
dry and school items. 

In addition, Wilkinson 
Hall won Hall Wars and will 
be receiving an ice cream 
social in return. 



The UAB movie will be 
"Lady in the Water," and it 
will be held at 8 p.m. on 
Thursday and Friday in the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room. The movie will be 
shown on Saturday at 8:00 
in the Gemmell Ritazza 
Area. 

The Leadership 

Institute will be sponsoring 
a talent show on Oct. 21. 
The event will take place at 
6:30 p.m. in the Gemmell 
Multi-Purpose Room. 

Sigma Tau Delta, the 
English Honors Fraternity 
will sponsor "Reading for 
the Cure" in Moore Hall on 
Friday Oct. 20 from 6- 10 
p.m. The event is in honor of 
those who have passed away 
or have survived cancer. 



Students: register at 
our Main Street loca- 
tion to win a FREE 
fe ^, Extra Value Meal! 

Pm lovin' It 

McDonald's Restaurants 




BUY OHE BIG MAC 
emlPWICH GET QHI 



'Hill 



coupon vttien you buy 
"9 Big M ac sandwich and receive a second one free Limit' 
one food item per coupon, per custon^ier. per visit. Not valid 
>Mth any other offer 




Valid in Clarion 

ExpirMl1/1A)6 




BUY ONE McGrldille 

GET ONE Hj. 




Present tNs coupon vvtien you buy 
Iriy McGridcRe saidvwh and receive another McGriddle sancMflcTf 
of equal or lesser value free. Lint one food item per coupon, per 
cuslonrer, per vis». Not vaM vntth any other offer 

Valid in Clarion 

^_^ Expires 11 11 A)5 ^ 






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